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Which Is The Worst Type Of Diabetes

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Late Update: To be completely clear, the goal of this post is to point out how unproductive this question is. It comes up from time to time in the forums, but only leads to division. We all, regardless of type, have plenty to share with each other. Now, on to the original article. On our Facebook page, we discussed the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In the process, some type 1s and type 2s both suggested that they had it worse. Before we look at this question, let’s review the difference between the two types. The Difference Between Type 1 & Type 2 Imagine insulin is the key that opens your cells and lets sugar enter. If sugar can’t enter, it builds up in the blood, makes you hungry and thirsty, and causes your body to turn to fat for energy. The symptoms of diabetes. In type 1, your pancreas stops making keys. You need to put keys in your body (i.e. inject insulin) or sugar can’t get into your cells. In type 2 diabetes, the keyhole is rusty. You have keys, but they have trouble opening the cells. You either need more keys or a way to make the lock work better. You can take a little rust off the lock by exercising, losing weight, or taking medication. This is an imperfect analogy, but hopefully it highlights the basic difference. So Which Type Is Worse? This is a maddening question. Every person is unique, and neither type is a cake walk! Type 1s need insulin to live – but type 2s can require enormous amounts of insulin as their resistance to it increases and their insulin production declines. Type 2s can walk around undiagnosed for 5 years and have complications when diagnosed. People with type 1 usually get diagnosed quickly and can take immediate action. But don’t type 1s live with diabetes for a longer period of time? Not always! Some type Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 10 Deadliest Myths

Diabetes: 10 Deadliest Myths

More than 24 million Americans have diabetes, and many people who have the disease don't know it. What can be done to reduce the risk of this devastating illness, which can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, and amputations? Quite a bit, says diabetes expert Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. The key, he says, is not to fall victim to common myths about the disease. Here are 10 of the worst. Myth: Diabetes Doesn't Run in My Family, So I'm Safe Many people develop diabetes despite the fact that they have no family history of the disease. Heredity certainly plays a role, but studies involving identical twins show it is not the only factor. When one twin has type 1 diabetes, the other has a fifty-fifty chance of having it, too. For type 2 diabetes, twins are more likely to share the diagnosis - the odds of the second twin having it can be as high as 75 percent. But even then, the reason may be that their diets and weight gain are similar. Bottom line? To minimize your risk for diabetes, you need to exercise and watch what you eat no matter what your family history is. Myth: Diabetes Is Caused by Eating Carbohydrates Diabetes is least common in the population groups whose diets emphasize carbohydrates. Take Japan, where rice is a traditional staple. Prior to 1980, fewer than 5 percent of the adult population there had diabetes. But once fast food and meat started to displace rice, diabetes became much more prevalent. By 1990 the prevalence of diabetes in Japan had doubled. In the U.S., the risk for type 2 diabetes is highest among frequent meat-eaters. Vegans have the lowest risk, and other groups (semi-vegetarians, fish-eaters, and lacto-ovo-vegetarians) are in between. The real problem seems to be not carbohydrates, but Continue reading >>

Fructose Is Not The Worst Type Of Sugar, Researchers Say

Fructose Is Not The Worst Type Of Sugar, Researchers Say

Fructose is not the worst type of sugar, researchers say Fructose is not the worst type of sugar, researchers say Considered by many to be the worst of the worst, fructose is the fall guy of sugar. Anti-sugar campaigners focus on fructose because it is metabolised differently to sucrose (table sugar) and glucose; fructose is broken down by the liver and, the theory goes , overloads it leading to a plethora of health conditions including diabetes, cancer, obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Not so sweet: Our level of sugar consumption is harming us. But new research out of the University of Canberra suggests it is precisely the fact that fructose is processed by the liver that makes it a healthier option. "Conflicting evidence exists on the effects of fructose consumption in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus," said the authors of the study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition . Dr Kerry Mills, the lead author, and her team examined the existing research to see if they could distinguish between the effects of fructose, glucose and sucrose. Many studies were of rats, whose metabolism is very different to humans. "The researchers often extrapolate the results erroneously from animals to humans," she said. Additionally, many studies on fructose were "poorly designed", Mills said, and didn't control for differences in the type of sugar. Instead, many gave one group fructose and the other no sugar. "That would mean that the second group were consuming more calories and more carbohydrate than the first group," she explained. "The researchers often attribute things like weight gain or raised triglycerides to the fructose, but it could have been the extra calories or the extra carbohydrate." For their study, Dr Mills and her team analy Continue reading >>

Ask D:mine: And The 'worst' Type Of Diabetes Is...

Ask D:mine: And The 'worst' Type Of Diabetes Is...

Need help navigating life with diabetes? You can always Ask D'Mine! Welcome again to our weekly Q&A column, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil tackles that universal question of "who has it worse?" when it comes to diabetes. We never like to compare conditions, but this question does keep popping up, and as usual, Wil has done his homework. So, read on! Amy, type 1 from Wisconsin, asks: What are the findings on which 'brand' of diabetes -- type 1 or type 2 -- has more complications, or has serious complications more frequently? Is there any research out there that monitored complications for each type separately? I have looked and found nothing...but you are the master; if it is out there, I am sure you can get your hands on it! [email protected] D'Mine answers: You're right that good research is hard to come by on this subject, and passions about it run very high. Nothing seems to get type 1s and type 2s at each others' throats more quickly than the "who has it worse" question. Now, all other things being equal, sugar in the blood stream is equally toxic for T1s and T2s. We know it can trash your eyes, kidneys, nerve endings, and pretty much everything else in your body. And in either type 1 or type 2, if you can normalize your blood sugar, you are largely immune from these toxic effects (yes, I know that this is easier said than done). So, in theory, the two types of diabetes should be on equal footing. But they are not. More on that in a minute. But first I want to talk a bit more about who has it worse. Being type 1 myself, and working with a fair number of other type 1s, and a whole lot more type 2s for many years now, I think I'm qualified to state which is "worse." At the risk of being flamed alive—a common fate for columnis Continue reading >>

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes? Late Update: To be completely clear, the goal of this post is to point out how unproductive this question is. It comes up from time to time in the forums, but only leads to division. We all, regardless of type, have plenty to share with each other. Now, on to the original article. On our Facebook page , we discussed the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In the process, some type 1s and type 2s both suggested that they had it worse. Before we look at this question, lets review the difference between the two types. Imagine insulin is the key that opens your cells and lets sugar enter. If sugar cant enter, it builds up in the blood, makes you hungry and thirsty, and causes your body to turn to fat for energy. The symptoms of diabetes. In type 1, your pancreas stops making keys. You need to put keys in your body (i.e. inject insulin) or sugar cant get into your cells. In type 2 diabetes, the keyhole is rusty. You have keys, but they have trouble opening the cells. You either need more keys or a way to make the lock work better. You can take a little rust off the lock by exercising, losing weight, or taking medication. This is an imperfect analogy, but hopefully it highlights the basic difference. This is a maddening question. Every person is unique, and neither type is a cake walk! Type 1s need insulin to live but type 2s can require enormous amounts of insulin as their resistance to it increases and their insulin production declines. Type 2s can walk around undiagnosed for 5 years and have complications when diagnosed. People with type 1 usually get diagnosed quickly and can take immediate action. But dont type 1s live with diabetes for a longer period of time? Not always! Some type 1s, like Diabetes Dailys co-founde Continue reading >>

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

When people hear that you have diabetes, they start to make assumptions that aren't always accurate. A lot of the confusion stems from the fact that there are two main types, yet many people don't understand how they're different. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get daily healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) As someone with type 1 diabetes—I was diagnosed with it nearly 40 years ago—I'm all too familiar with the disease. I lived with it as a child, teen, and adult, and when I decided to have kids I had to figure out how to manage the condition while being pregnant. (I even wrote a book about it, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby.) Having type 1 diabetes means I'm in the minority: Of the approximately 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only 1.25 million have type 1. Most have type 2, which is a totally different form. "Comparing type 1 to type 2 is like comparing apples to tractors," says Gary Scheiner, a Pennsylvania-based certified diabetes educator and author of Think Like a Pancreas. "The only thing they really have in common is that both involve an inability to control blood sugar levels." Here are 5 important distinctions. 1. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease; type 2 isn't. Diabetes happens when your body has trouble with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. When there isn’t enough insulin in your body, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can make you sick. People with type 1 and type 2 both face this problem, but how they arrived there is quite different. If you have type 1, you don't make any insulin at all. That's because type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-making cells in your Continue reading >>

The Good, The Bad And The Worst Of Type 1 Diabetes

The Good, The Bad And The Worst Of Type 1 Diabetes

It is common in a diabetic’s life to face questions like “do you have the good type of diabetes or the bad one?” To be really honest, these are the types of questions that I really don’t know how to answer. What does “good” and “bad” diabetes even mean? Recently, I changed jobs in my office, so now I’m facing a lot of these types of questions again, and because of this, I thought that maybe it would be interesting to write a bit about the basic features of diabetes — the good, the bad and the worst. The Good Let’s start with the “goods” of diabetes. Because Diabetes is associated with the lack of capability of your body to naturally regulate the levels of glucose in your bloodstream, as a type 1 diabetic, you always have to help your body do that. In addition to self-injecting insulin, you can also do simple things like pay special attention to what you eat and how often you exercise. In this way, diabetes gives you an extra-healthy motivation to exercise every day and to eat healthier. This is clearly a good thing — you become more aware of your own fitness levels and more conscious about these kinds of topics. When my personal trainer discovered that I was diabetic, right away he understood why did I knew all the information about the “recommended amount of carbs” — the type of carbs and digestion times — that we had discussed during our first session. Review my blog posts on exercising and nutrition for more information on this. The Bad Looking at the bad things, the first that comes to my mind is definitely the danger that a diabetic faces every time we don’t eat enough, or when we inject too many units of insulin. All these situations can have repercussions in terms of losing consciousness and doing things that you end up not r Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

Which Type Of Diabetes Do I Have?

Which Type Of Diabetes Do I Have?

Tweet It is not always obvious which type of diabetes someone may have and it may be necessary for your health to carry out specific tests to find out which type of diabetes you have. In some cases, people initially diagnosed with one type of diabetes may be given a re-diagnosis at a later date. Which types of diabetes exist? Type 1 diabetes - an autoimmune disease, often, but not always, diagnosed in children Type 2 diabetes - characterised by the body not responding properly to insulin, often, but not always, associated with having excess body weight Gestational diabetes - a form of diabetes, similar to type 2 diabetes, that specifically develops during pregnancy Prediabetes - an early form of type 2 diabetes LADA - a slower progressing form of type 1 diabetes that can develop in adults MODY - a form of diabetes caused by specific genetic mutations There is a distinct difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, although it may not be evident without the correct tests. Find out more about the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Tests to diagnose different types of diabetes If your health team are in doubt about which type of diabetes you have, you may need to have one or more tests to deduce which type of diabetes you have. The following flowchart shows how tests can be carried out to distinguish between different types of diabetes. C-peptide: A C-peptide test is used to assess how much insulin your pancreas is producing Autoantibodies: Autoantibodies refers to immune cells which target and kill the insulin producing cells in the pancreas, a GAD test is used to detect the presence of specific autoantibodies in the blood Type 2: Type 2 diabetes - most common in adults IM Type 1: Immune mediated type 1 diabetes, the most common form of type 1 diabetes Idio Continue reading >>

Which Of The Following Is The Worst: Cancer, Diabetes, Or Hiv? Why?

Which Of The Following Is The Worst: Cancer, Diabetes, Or Hiv? Why?

Cancer depends on the type and the stage but even in the best case scenario it's pretty much difficult to deal with. There are local complications of the tumor, metastasis, low immunity, complications of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Diabetes is controllable and if detected early a good control will prevent or delay the complication that usually involve the Heart, Kidney, Central Nervous System, Eyes and Peripheral Nerves. HIV prognosis is good with antiviral treatment, as long as you keep the viral load low you'll live a near normal live for 15 to 20 years but at the end your immune system will start to fail and you will be prone to infections which is the most common cause of death in HIV patients. So, I would say that Cancer is the worst of the three followed by HIV then Diabetes. Continue reading >>

Which Is Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes In General

Which Is Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes In General

Which is Worse Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes in General Which is worse type 1 or type 2 diabetes? If you are asking this kind of question, then you might never find the person who can give you the answer. Both of those type has their own uniqueness that all of you will surely never want to experience. As an addition, both of those types also have something that will make you relieve when you acquired one of those types instead of the other type. Which is Worse Type 1 or Type 2; Type 1 Perspective For you who have not know what diabetes type 1 is, in short, this is the kind of diabetes that is commonly attack the people whose age is below twenty. The risk of diabetes type 1 can be considered as the worst for some people, especially for those who dream of many things for their future life. You should have known that diabetes can also trigger the heart disease that is able to kill you in an instant. For your information, the diabetes type 1 is the condition when your pancreas is not able to produce the insulin that will help the sugar to come into your blood. That is why when you get the diabetes type 1, you might have to inject the insulin for a few times a day to make you feel better. This might become your consideration when you are asking which is worse type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Which is Worse Type 1 or Type 2; Type 2 Perspective If you have understood the diabetes type 1, then you also need to know diabetes type 2. In diabetes type 2, your pancreas will still be able to produce the insulin, but your blood will not be able to use it efficiently so that the insulin can be considered as something useless if it cannot be used by the body. When you are asking which is worse type 1 or type 2 diabetes, when you will have to take this factor into account. Besides that, most of Continue reading >>

Type 1 Vs Type 2 Diabetes Similarities Differences (cont.)

Type 1 Vs Type 2 Diabetes Similarities Differences (cont.)

What are the differences between the signs and symptoms of type 1 vs. type 2 diabetes? Signs and symptoms of diabetes, whether type 1 or type 2, do not differ. Early diabetes may not produce any symptoms at all. When symptoms do occur, the age of onset is typically different, with type 1 diabetes being diagnosed most often in younger people (in a child, for example), while type 2 diabetes is diagnosed more commonly in adults. However, this is not always the case. The increasing incidence of obesity among children and adolescents has caused a rise in the development of type 2 diabetes in young people. Further, some adults with diabetes may be diagnosed with a form of late onset type 1 diabetes. How are the signs and symptoms similar? There isn't a difference between the symptoms of either disease. The "classic" symptoms are the same for both diabetes type 1 and type 2: Increased urine output (polyuria) Increased thirst (polydipsia) Increased hunger (Polyphagia ) Unexplained weight loss For both type 1 and type 2, early symptoms of untreated diabetes arise due to elevated blood sugar levels and the presence of glucose in the urine. High amounts of glucose in the urine can cause increased urine output and dehydration. Dehydration, in turn, causes increased thirst. A lack of insulin or an inability of insulin to work properly affects protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Insulin normally encourages storage of fat and protein, so when there is inadequate insulin or poorly functioning insulin, this eventually leads to weight loss despite an increase in appetite. Some untreated diabetes patients also experience generalized symptoms like fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. People with diabetes are also at risk for infections of the bladder, skin, and vaginal areas. Changes in bl Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

A fellow caregiver asked... How serious is type 2 diabetes, and is it less or more serious than type 1 diabetes? My mom, just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, keeps it under control without taking insulin. So is type 2 diabetes less of a problem than insulin-dependent type 1? Expert Answers No, definitely not. In fact, in some ways type 2 diabetes is a more serious disorder because your mom may have had it for years before she was diagnosed. So she may well have developed some of the long-term, debilitating complications linked to the condition without knowing it. In addition, since type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder without a cure, over time her body may not be able to produce insulin or use it as well as it does now, and she may wind up needing insulin injections or pills. A person with type1 diabetes ignores it for a day at his own peril. He'll likely end up in the emergency room because his body can't absorb glucose without a continuous supply of insulin via injection or an insulin pump. People with type 1 diabetes typically develop such severe symptoms over a short time in childhood or early adulthood that they're forced to deal with it. Type 2 diabetes is a sneakier condition: Its harmful health effects can slowly build for years until full-blown complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, or foot problems, make it impossible to ignore. Plus it often comes with its own set of problems. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes are frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure and cholesterol along with high blood sugar. This damaging threesome can lead to progressive thickening of the arteries and reduced blood flow, putting your mom at greater risk for a slew of complications including heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. If your mom is overweigh Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

First, the formal name for what we commonly call diabetes is diabetes mellitus, which translates from the Greek as making lots of urine with sugar in it or making lots of sweet urine. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are diseases that have in common, sugar in the urine and the increased urination. When there are high amounts of sugar in the blood, the kidneys filter sugar into the urine. Sugar can be measured in the urine through a lab test commonly called a urinalysis. Urine dipsticks are also used to show sugar in the urine. Patients who develop diabetes mellitus most commonly have initial symptoms of increased thirst, increased urination and blurred vision due to high amounts of sugar in the fluids of the eye. Type 1 diabetes results from a rheumatoid-like autoimmune reaction in which one's own body attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that normally produce insulin. Type 1 is a disease in which the patient in a relatively short time has no insulin production. All patients with type 1 diabetes can also develop a serious metabolic disorder called ketoacidosis when their blood sugars are high and there is not enough insulin in their body. Ketoacidosis can be fatal unless treated as an emergency with hydration and insulin. Type 1 was once commonly called juvenile diabetes mellitus because it is most commonly diagnosed in children. It should be noted that even older adults in their 60s have occasionally been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus. One should think of it as a disease of high blood sugars due to a deficiency of insulin production. It must be treated by administration of insulin. Insulin is given at least twice a day and is often given four times a day in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes rates are growing dramatically Continue reading >>

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