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Which Is The Best Rice For Diabetics?

Four Rice Options For A Healthy Diabetes Diet

Four Rice Options For A Healthy Diabetes Diet

Rice is a staple food that is eaten all around the world. It’s a cereal grass that is cultivated for its edible grain. Although the definition of rice is quite straightforward, the different varieties and forms can make it difficult to choose what’s best for a diabetes meal plan. The following list provides a breakdown of popular rice varieties and the amount of carbs and glycemic index for each. 4 Rice Options for Healthy Meals Basmati Rice Basmati RiceBasmati rice has longer grains or kernels than other rice varieties. It’s known for its distinct flavor and aroma – the taste has been compared to roasted nuts or popcorn. Basmati rice is predominantly used in Indian cuisine, but can be used with various dishes. The kernels cook lengthwise, which results in long, free-flowing rice that is fluffy rather than sticky. Basmati rice is available in both brown and white varieties. In 1 cup cooked: 44 grams of carbs, 1 g of fiber, glycemic index = 58 Wild Rice Wild RiceWild rice is known for its nutty flavor and chewy texture. It’s made up of four different types of grasses from the genus Zizania. It is native to the area around the Great Lakes, where Native Americans harvest it, so it is also known as Indian Rice. Because of the popularity of wild rice, it’s also commercially produced (i.e. not wild anymore) and readily available. In 1 cup cooked: 35 grams of carbs, 3 g of fiber, glycemic index = 57 Sweet, Sticky, or Waxy Rice Sticky RiceSweet, sticky, or waxy rice is a short-grain Asian rice, which, as its name implies, is sticky and gelatinous. It can have a sweeter taste than other rices and can be used as a savory side dish or as a dessert, depending on the cuisine. It has a higher glycemic index value than other rice varieties. Sweet rice is often considered t Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Rice For Diabetics, Which Rice You Should Choose

What Is The Best Rice For Diabetics, Which Rice You Should Choose

What is the Best Rice for Diabetics, Which Rice You Should Choose Hello everyone! Im back with a new blog post, this time focusing on the best type of rice for diabetics.As you all know, a diabetic is a person who has a high blood glucose or blood sugar in the body. This metabolism disorder is more known as diabetes or diabetes mellitus as doctors often refer to as.What is the best rice for diabetics?I invite you to read. There are actually many known types of diabetes that varies in causes and treatment. The three most known are: Type 1 Diabetes (formerly known as insulin-dependent) This is uncommon in comparison to type 2. Only an approximate 10% of the population of diabetics are type 1. In this type, the body does not at all produce insulin and so patients will need to take insulin injections for their lifetime. Type 2 Diabetes (formerly known as non-insulin-dependent) This is the most common with approximately 90% worldwide having this type. It is here when the body produces insulin but not enough for proper function. Some diabetics with this type can control it by losing weight through a healthy diet and exercise. However, this type of disease is progressive. Hence, if not controlled, it will worsen through time when patients need to have an intake of insulin. As the name suggests, this type develops during women pregnancy a.k.a. gestation. A high blood sugar level will not only affect the health of the pregnant woman but the baby inside the womb as well. Since Type 1 and Gestational diabetes doesnt have known risk factors that are curable, Ill be focusing on Type 2 and some ways to treat it. From its risk factors alone, we get the idea that you can control Type 2 diabetes symptoms through a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle. According to the director of the di Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwic Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes

Diet And Diabetes

To live a long and healthy life with Diabetes, following diet and exercise are very important along with medication. Diabetic diet is not different from normal diet; however some modifications need to be done for the normal diet Dietary Guidelines Eat more Vegetables: Eat more locally available and seasonal vegetables. Take them as curry, raita, and in raw form. Include green leafy vegetables regularly in the diet. Vegetables; contain fibre and many vitamins and minerals which are helpful in control of diabetes and to maintain good health. Eat variety of foods: for better control of blood sugar instead of using only rice include other grains like wheat, jowar, ragi or unpolished; rice in the diet, eating only white rice is not going to help to control Blood sugar. More of whole Grains: Include whole dals like moong dal and channa dal in everyday diet. Use less oil: Diabetic person is at higher risk of hear disease, it is advisable o reduce the consumption of oil for cooking. Restricted amount of oil for cooking and not preparing the vegetables in fried forms will help to consume less amount of oil. Traditionally used oils like groundnut and gingelly oil are good for health. Ghee, butter, coconut oil contain different type of fats, (which may increase cholesterol) and should be taken in small quantities. Use less salt: usually Indian diet is rich in salt, especially when using pickles, papad and adding more salt to food is quite common. Normally people with diabetes may also get Hypertension (B.P) and it is better to restrict the intake of pickles, papad and adding less salt while cooking food. Use of Eggs/ Non veg: Fish contains special type of oil which helps in blood sugar management, so consumption of fish is encouraged 3-4 times a week. Chicken also contain less fat Continue reading >>

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing this food. There’s the camp that is indignant at the idea that pasta even exists — it spikes up blood glucose, causes weight gain, and may just be responsible for global warming (OK, that’s an exaggeration). There’s another camp who still eats pasta, but feels horribly guilty for doing so, and will swear with their right hand in the air that, “I really only ate a half a cup” (and 99% of the time, it’s just not the case). I don’t mean to trivialize the subject. Pasta can be tricky to fit into one’s diabetes eating plan. But not because it sends blood glucose levels to the moon. My belief (and you’re welcome to disagree with me) is that most of us struggle with portion control. It’s been engrained in us that pasta is a main dish: that it should be piled high on the plate and smothered in red sauce, with a crusty, buttery slice of garlic bread resting on the side. This is where the problems come in. Here’s what I mean. Take a look at the calories and carbs in the pasta meal that I just mentioned: 3 cups of pasta: 135 grams of carbohydrate, 663 calories 1 cup of sauce: 30 grams of carbohydrate, 185 calories 1 slice of garlic bread: 24 grams of carbohydrate, 170 calories Total: 189 grams of carbohydrate, 1,018 calories If you dine in an Italian restaurant and manage to clean your plate, you’ll consume even more carbohydrate and calories. When you look at p Continue reading >>

Corn For Diabetics, Great Alternative To Rice –research Prof

Corn For Diabetics, Great Alternative To Rice –research Prof

MANILA, July 28 (PNA) — There are various alternatives to rice as a staple and with a lot of dietary benefits as well; one of the most popular ones we known of today is corn. According to University of the Philippines Los Baños research professor, Dr. Artemio Salazar the best thing about using corn instead of rice was that it not only tasted similar, it also had significantly higher protein, dietary fiber, minerals, anti-oxidants and amylose than other staples. Salazar explained in a recent seminar, that white corn, in particular had higher amylose content than rice which explained its ability to have a harder gelatinization and slower digestion. This, he said was good news for diabetic patients because it was exactly what they needed to keep their digestion in the right pace. “Foods with low GI (glycemic index) can lessen the risk of diabetes by slowly releasing glucose into the blood stream,” Salazar said. “Low GI food helps delay hunger and promotes weight loss,” he said. “Low GI food is a slow-releasing fuel for the muscles which can extend endurance.” However, Salazar also explained that while corn was a good staple to try out, Filipinos are not usually used to shifting to eating something they have already been used to. “Shifting from rice to pure corn is difficult, hence rice blend is recommended,” Salazar said, explaining how it was rice blend (rice composite) has acceptable taste similar to rice alone. “The acceptable ratio for the rice blend is 70:30,” he said. Another benefit of corn as a staple was shown in a study wherein there was a one kg weight gain of children fed with 70:30 rice blend. (PNA) CTB/ANP Continue reading >>

Diabetic Rice Recipes

Diabetic Rice Recipes

Just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you need to cut rice out of your diet. Instead of starchy white rice, opt for a whole grain rice such as brown rice, which is rich in vitamin B and antioxidants. Our diabetes-friendly rice recipes can help you maintain a healthy eating plan that tastes great, too. Just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you need to cut rice out of your diet. Instead of starchy white rice, opt for a whole grain rice such as brown rice, which is rich in vitamin B and antioxidants. Our diabetes-friendly rice recipes can help you maintain a healthy eating plan that tastes great, too. Just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you need to cut rice out of your diet. Instead of starchy white rice, opt for a whole grain rice such as brown rice, which is rich in vitamin B and antioxidants. Our diabetes-friendly rice recipes can help you maintain a healthy eating plan that tastes great, too. Just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you need to cut rice out of your diet. Instead of starchy white rice, opt for a whole grain rice such as brown rice, which is rich in vitamin B and antioxidants. Our diabetes-friendly rice recipes can help you maintain a healthy eating plan that tastes great, too. Continue reading >>

Fighting Diabetes: Why The Target Is White Rice

Fighting Diabetes: Why The Target Is White Rice

As a staple, more of it is eaten; but more brown rice will boost health News that the Health Promotion Board (HPB) is targeting white rice in its fight against diabetes has created a storm of protest from rice lovers. Could the staple food of Asians for centuries truly be bad for health, they asked. Many of those outraged by the report on the targeting (" Diabetes: the rice you eat is worse than sugary drinks ", May 6) were more than happy to make sweet drinks and junk food the real villains that cause diabetes, which, while enjoyable, are not part of Singapore's heritage. But they were vehement that it could not be the traditional, steaming bowls of white rice that they consider essential. Yes, sweet drinks and junk food are bad, and no one, least of all the HPB, is denying this. What it is saying, though, is that white rice is also a major culprit - largely because it is a staple, so more of it is eaten. Starchy white rice, it has been found, can overload Asian bodies with blood sugar and heighten their risk of diabetes. Then add to that, this in terms of consumption: The 2010 National Nutrition Survey found a typical serving of rice here was 250g, and that a third of Singaporeans' daily intake of calories comes from rice - compared to 3.5 per cent from sugary drinks. Then there is this: A Harvard School of Public Health study found that each serving of white rice a day raises the risk of diabetes by 11 per cent. A study of rice and noodle consumption by 2,728 Chinese here by the National University Health System found it resulted in greater insulin resistance. For those who argue that rice has been eaten for centuries with no ill effects, the counter-arguments are: In the pre-industrialisation era, there was a lot more physical exertion. Even in everyday life, peopl Continue reading >>

An Alternative To Rice For Diabetics

An Alternative To Rice For Diabetics

(From the author’s blog, “Behind the Bamboo Veil”) Day 1: Coming to terms At age 50, I discovered that I have become a diabetic. I didn’t really realize what it meant to be a diabetic, only that my blood sugar level was “higher than the norm.” What I understand, from the underpinnings of many subsequent consultations and conversations with my endocrinologist, is that once a diabetic, always a diabetic. My goal should be to control the blood sugar levels from reaching extreme highs. Yet as I struggle to maintain some form of equilibrium, it can happen that blood sugar levels may drop precariously low as well. So perhaps the right way to phrase it is that my goal should be to control the blood sugar levels from reaching extremes of highs or lows, period. Sigh, the horror stories of severe diabetes. From possible blindness to amputation due to gangrene and cuts that wouldn’t heal, from renal failure to kidney transplants to death due to multiple organ failure and cardiac arrest… Sigh, the paradox of diabetes. Weight gain—is it a symptom or a result of the condition? Sigh, the painful truth about diabetes, especially Type II diabetes mellitus: While genetics encourages a predisposition to it, diet and level of activity are the early determinants. So now that I am a certified diabetic, it really was pretty much of my own doing! Of course, nearly 20 years of therapy and psychiatric medication pushed me along and helped the condition blossom. Of course, that my mother died at 87 of complications that developed from diabetes put me at risk for developing the same disease. Of course, that I eat as much rice as a construction worker after a hard day must have given me more spare tires than a car had any right to have. Of course, that I drink very socially, and v Continue reading >>

Is Rice Good For Diabetics?

Is Rice Good For Diabetics?

Rice has received some negative publicity lately regarding its effects on the development of diabetes. A large study, published this March in the British Medical Journal, found that regular eaters of white rice were significanty more likely to develop type-2 diabetes than people who rarely consume the food. The study found that the risk of developing diabetes was 55% higher for Asian populations and 12% higher for western populations in those who consume 3 to 4 servings of white rice a day compared to those who rarely consumed white rice. The results are controversial however because most countries that consume large amounts of rice actually have a very low diabetes incidence, suggesting that if white rice consumption is a risk factor for diabetes, it is much less important than other established risk factors such as a sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Brown rice consumption on the other hand generally shows an inverse association with diabetes risk. For example, a Harvard study, published in 2010, found that two servings of brown rice a week cut the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by about 11%. The differing results between brown and white rice are likely due to the lower GI, and more favourable nutrient profile of brown rice. When compared to potatoes, white rice has a similar GI, but lower amounts of magnesium and fiber, two components that are beneficial for diabetic patients. 100 grams of cooked white rice has no dietary fiber and only 8mg of magnesium compared to 1.8g of fiber and 20mg of magnesium in the same amount of boiled potatoes. In contrast, brown rice has 1.8g of fiber and an impressive 43mg of magnesium. This doesn’t necessarily mean that white rice should be avoided altogether however regular eaters of white rice should ensure that they get adequate Continue reading >>

Which Kind Of Rice Is Best? Hint: It’s Not Brown.

Which Kind Of Rice Is Best? Hint: It’s Not Brown.

Let me start by saying that rice is not exactly a health food. It’s mainly starch and isn’t really a good source of micronutrients. But, it’s something I can’t live without. Coming from an ethnic background that relies on it, meals without it just don’t feel the same. Yes, I know there are “mockups” like cauliflower rice, but c’mon it’s not the same . So, from time to time, I’ll indulge myself and make some rice, but in the back of my head, I know it isn’t a wise choice given my family history of diabetes. Not that rice alone causes diabetes. But there does seem to be a connection between rice and diabetes in several studies (more on that later). Is there any rice I can enjoy just a couple times a week that won’t up my risk of diabetes? The media tells us that brown rice is the best bet health-wise, but is that really the case? Is white better than brown? Or is there some other kind I am missing out on? So many questions! Which means it’s time to find answers. There are many, many different kinds of rice available in the market – long-grain, short-grain, white, brown, red, purple, black – the list is endless. But for the purpose of this article, I’ll stick to the different kinds that we usually encounter at the grocery store. Most commonly, you’ll see white, brown, parboiled and minute (instant) rice at the local stores. So let’s dive in to see what the differences are. White rice Regular-milled white rice, often referred to as “white” or “polished” rice is the most common form. The outer husk is removed, and the layers of bran are milled until the grain is white. You can find many different varieties such as basmati, jasmine, arborio, etc. Brown rice Brown rice is rice from which only the hull has been removed. It has a sligh Continue reading >>

People Suffering From High Blood Sugar Should Eat Wild Rice

People Suffering From High Blood Sugar Should Eat Wild Rice

People Suffering From High Blood Sugar Should Eat Wild Rice Wild rice is becoming more popular around the world. Not only is the grain delicious, but its highly nutritious, and many scientists are studying to food to validate its wide range of proposed health benefits. Wild rice provide a great combination of fiber, antioxidants and minerals, that are essential for protecting against many diseases and health conditions. The grain is even great for the fight against diabetes. Studies show that wild rice have the ability to help balance sugar levels in the body. In a study published in the journal Nutrients in 2013, researchers suggested that switching out portions of starchy dietary carbohydrates for wild rice may help to reduce insulin resistance and improve other markers of health. In their study the scientists saw that when they replaced white rice for wild rice in the participants, it had the effect of reducing insulin resistance, and also reduced triglyceride. In other study, the scientists saw that even in a diet high in cholesterol and fat, wild rice was able to impose its healthy effects on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. The researchers suggested that the high levels of fiber, magnesium, and other essential minerals in wild rice help to regulate the metabolism. Wild rice has a nutty, rich flavor and can be used in wide variety of recipes, including salads, soups, pasta dishes, and stir-fries. The grain can be purchase in many health food stores around the world. Continue reading >>

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

When it comes to your risk of diabetes, a new study by Harvard researchers suggests that eating less white rice could make a difference. Each additional daily serving of white rice, a staple of Asian diets, may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 10%, according to the study, which analyzed the results of four previous studies involving 352,384 participants from four countries: China, Japan, U.S. and Australia. Those who ate the highest amounts of white rice had a 27% higher risk of diabetes than those who ate the least, and the risk was most pronounced in Asian people. The studies followed people for anywhere from 4 to 22 years, tracking their food intake. All the participants were diabetes-free at the beginning of the study. MORE: Five Ways to Avoid Diabetes — Without Medications Why white rice may impact diabetes risk isn’t clear, but it may have to do with the food’s high score on the glycemic index (GI) — a measurement of how foods affect blood sugar levels — meaning that it can cause spikes in blood sugar. High GI ranking foods have previously been associated with increased risk of diabetes. “White rice also lacks nutrients like fiber and magnesium,” says study author Qi Sun, a professor of medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. “People with high white rice consumption lack these beneficial nutrients and Asian populations consume a lot of white rice. If you consume brown rice instead, you will get these nutrients. There are alternatives.” But before you swear off white rice for good, the study authors and other nutrition experts caution that it’s not the only culprit in diabetes risk. Rather, a general decrease in physical activity and increase in food consumption may be responsible for the rise in obesity and insulin res Continue reading >>

The Best Grains For Diabetics

The Best Grains For Diabetics

As those with diabetes know, limiting carbohydrates, especially grains, is an important dietary step in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. However, when you do decide to enjoy a grain dish, there are a few options that will not only keep you on your path to recovery, but also provide you with an array of nutrients and health benefits. Overall, consuming carbohydrates that have been processed/refined (stripped of all their vitamins, minerals, fibers and other nutrients) to make white varieties of rice, pasta, bread, bagels, crackers and cookies can cause extreme ups and downs in blood sugar levels, overwork the liver and pancreas, and rob the body of existing vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium from its storage banks in order to break down and digest the food properly. Low glycemic, complex, whole grains such as buckwheat, amaranth, millet, brown rice, quinoa and kamut are ideal choices for those with a stable inner physiology. Each one described below contains many key nutritional properties that can be helpful in both the prevention and management of diabetes. Buckwheat: This "grain" actually comes from a fruit seed making it an ideal food for those with gluten sensitivities and diabetes. Research findings have shown that buckwheat can actually lower blood sugar levels. Buckwheat is high in magnesium, phytonutrients, and dietary fiber. Amaranth: Also a non-gluten "grain", amaranth is high in protein (15-18%) and contains more calcium than milk. It’s rich in amino acids and contains more lysine than any other grain. It’s also a great source of fiber, iron, potassium, and many other vitamins and minerals. Millet: This energy producing grain provides 26.4% of the daily value for magnesium, a co-factor for the enzymes involved in insulin secretion Continue reading >>

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