diabetestalk.net

Which Is The Best Rice For Diabetics?

Is Brown Rice Really Better?

Is Brown Rice Really Better?

Our product picks are editor-tested, expert-approved. We may earn a commission through links on our site. Brown or white rice? Diabetes risk jumps 11 percent for each serving of white rice eaten per day, according to a new meta-analysis of Asian and US/Australian populations published in BMJ. But white rice doesnt necessarily cause diabetes, says Clyde Wilson, Ph.D., a nutrition professor in the Stanford University and University of California, San Francisco schools of medicine. The reality is that eating too much of any carbohydrate, including brown rice, can lead to diabetes, he says. More from MensHealth.com: Should You Eat More Chocolate White rice is implicated because of its high glycemic index (GI). High GI diets tend to spike blood sugar levels quickly and are associated with diabetes. However, the glycemic index of brown rice is only about 10 to 20 percent less than white, so it digests relatively quickly, too. (Not to mention, there are several problems with the GI measure to begin with.) Its more about the amount youre eating, less about the type. Rice can be a healthy part of your diet. They key is to slow the rate your body digests carbs, so they dont cause a dangerous rise of glucose in your bloodstream. First, choose white or brown based onand heres a brilliant ideawhat you like best. Whether eating white or brown, add raw veggies, like a side salad. Foods act as a team within a meal and vegetables will slow down digestion and cancel out any negative effects of the rice, says Wilson. Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Sushi If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Sushi If I Have Diabetes?

Wildly popular sushi may not be the healthiest option for people with diabetes. Those beautifully-arranged combinations of fish (raw and cooked), sticky rice and seaweed can have surprisingly-high carb counts. Here's how to have your sushi and eat it, too. When you think about sushi, you might picture nigiri, slices of raw salmon, tuna, or mackerel, resting on beds of pressed and seasoned white rice, wrapped in a band of seaweed, and arranged in look-alike rows on a white plate in a Japanese restaurant or in a black plastic tray at the supermarket, garnished with plastic grass, a ball of wasabi paste, and a rosebud of pickled ginger. Or maybe you picture maki, the traditional rice, seaweed, and fish combination, rolled together into a log and sliced into bite-size rounds. While both count as sushi, neither dish completely or even accurately defines the word. What is Sushi? The word sushi is not synonymous with raw fish, but rather with the seasoned vinegar—typically, rice wine vinegar flavored with a little salt and sugar—used to flavor any number of ingredients rolled into or sitting beside or atop a sticky mass of similarly flavored starchy, medium-grain white rice. Though commonly referred to as sushi, the Japanese word for raw fish is actually sashimi. And even when traditional sushi dishes include fish, it’s not always raw. Some of the most popular varieties, both in Japan and the United States, are made with cooked eel, crab, and shrimp, not to mention the imitation seafood stuffed into many a California roll. In addition to providing a balanced combination of flavors, textures, and nutrients (if you choose wisely), the creation of sushi is often akin to an art form, because it can be just as much fun to look at, as it is to eat, especially when prepared by Continue reading >>

Four Rice Options For A Healthy Diabetes Diet

Four Rice Options For A Healthy Diabetes Diet

Rice is a staple food that is eaten all around the world. It’s a cereal grass that is cultivated for its edible grain. Although the definition of rice is quite straightforward, the different varieties and forms can make it difficult to choose what’s best for a diabetes meal plan. The following list provides a breakdown of popular rice varieties and the amount of carbs and glycemic index for each. 4 Rice Options for Healthy Meals Basmati Rice Basmati RiceBasmati rice has longer grains or kernels than other rice varieties. It’s known for its distinct flavor and aroma – the taste has been compared to roasted nuts or popcorn. Basmati rice is predominantly used in Indian cuisine, but can be used with various dishes. The kernels cook lengthwise, which results in long, free-flowing rice that is fluffy rather than sticky. Basmati rice is available in both brown and white varieties. In 1 cup cooked: 44 grams of carbs, 1 g of fiber, glycemic index = 58 Wild Rice Wild RiceWild rice is known for its nutty flavor and chewy texture. It’s made up of four different types of grasses from the genus Zizania. It is native to the area around the Great Lakes, where Native Americans harvest it, so it is also known as Indian Rice. Because of the popularity of wild rice, it’s also commercially produced (i.e. not wild anymore) and readily available. In 1 cup cooked: 35 grams of carbs, 3 g of fiber, glycemic index = 57 Sweet, Sticky, or Waxy Rice Sticky RiceSweet, sticky, or waxy rice is a short-grain Asian rice, which, as its name implies, is sticky and gelatinous. It can have a sweeter taste than other rices and can be used as a savory side dish or as a dessert, depending on the cuisine. It has a higher glycemic index value than other rice varieties. Sweet rice is often considered t Continue reading >>

Which Rice Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Which Rice Is Best For People With Diabetes?

If you have type 2 diabetes, you may be familiar with the glycemic index and that foods with a low glycemic index are best for managing your disease. Knowing which foods have a low value can be confusing at times, but now a new study my help consumers make a choice concerning at least one food: rice. Which rice is best for people with diabetes? People with diabetes can eat rice The glycemic index is a tool to measure a food's effect on blood sugar. Generally, foods with a glycemic index of 55 or less are considered low (good), while values of 56 to 69 are medium and those 70 or higher are high (bad) glycemic index values. Foods with a high glycemic index make a person's blood sugar levels rise and fluctuate, which can increase the chance of getting diabetes and also make managing type 2 diabetes a challenge. Some of the items typically placed in the high glycemic index category include white bread (see "Best and Worst Breads for Diabetes"), baked goods, pasta, and rice. However, not all rice has a high glycemic index value, and indeed some varieties fall into the low category. Investigators from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and CSIRO's Food Futures Flagship evaluated 235 varieties of rice and discovered that the glycemic index values ranged from 48 to 92. That means people with diabetes have healthful options when it comes to choosing rice as part of their diet. Investigators also discovered that the main gene associated with glycemic index in all the varieties is the Waxy gene. This information will allow rice breeders to develop more varieties of rice with low glycemic index values and expand the options for people with type 2 diabetes. According to Dr. Melissa Fitzgerald, who headed the IRRI group, "Rice varieties like India's most widely grown ri Continue reading >>

Spotlight On... Diabetic Diets

Spotlight On... Diabetic Diets

A healthy, balanced diet is key to keeping your blood sugar levels in check and your diabetes under control... What is diabetes? Diabetes is a lifelong condition caused by a failure of the blood sugar regulation mechanism in the body. This is controlled by a hormone called insulin. Diabetes results when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or cells of the body become resistant to insulin so blood sugar levels are not controlled as they should be. Without the proper function of insulin, sugar cannot enter muscle or fat cells, causing serious secondary complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, neuropathy and other complications. Type 1 diabetes Insulin dependent, less common and usually develops before the age of 30. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas stops producing insulin. The exact cause is unknown but some believe that it is an autoimmune response in which the body attacks its own pancreatic cells. People with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin for life. Type 2 diabetes Non-insulin dependent, used to be most common in later life but is becoming increasingly more prevalent in younger generation largely due to an increase in obesity. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still produces insulin, but either it is not producing enough or the body does not respond to it properly. The most common cause of type 2 diabetes is obesity. In many cases, Type 2 diabetes can be avoided through eating a healthy, balanced diet and taking regular exercise and often can be controlled in the same way if diagnosed. However, some cases will require medication and your doctor should be the one to determine whether this is necessary. Recent research has reported interesting evidence to support the reversal of type 2 diabetes. Research funded by Diabetes UK and per Continue reading >>

Which Kind Of Rice Is Best? Hint: It’s Not Brown.

Which Kind Of Rice Is Best? Hint: It’s Not Brown.

Let me start by saying that rice is not exactly a health food. It’s mainly starch and isn’t really a good source of micronutrients. But, it’s something I can’t live without. Coming from an ethnic background that relies on it, meals without it just don’t feel the same. Yes, I know there are “mockups” like cauliflower rice, but c’mon it’s not the same . So, from time to time, I’ll indulge myself and make some rice, but in the back of my head, I know it isn’t a wise choice given my family history of diabetes. Not that rice alone causes diabetes. But there does seem to be a connection between rice and diabetes in several studies (more on that later). Is there any rice I can enjoy just a couple times a week that won’t up my risk of diabetes? The media tells us that brown rice is the best bet health-wise, but is that really the case? Is white better than brown? Or is there some other kind I am missing out on? So many questions! Which means it’s time to find answers. There are many, many different kinds of rice available in the market – long-grain, short-grain, white, brown, red, purple, black – the list is endless. But for the purpose of this article, I’ll stick to the different kinds that we usually encounter at the grocery store. Most commonly, you’ll see white, brown, parboiled and minute (instant) rice at the local stores. So let’s dive in to see what the differences are. White rice Regular-milled white rice, often referred to as “white” or “polished” rice is the most common form. The outer husk is removed, and the layers of bran are milled until the grain is white. You can find many different varieties such as basmati, jasmine, arborio, etc. Brown rice Brown rice is rice from which only the hull has been removed. It has a sligh Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

People Suffering From High Blood Sugar Should Eat Wild Rice

People Suffering From High Blood Sugar Should Eat Wild Rice

People Suffering From High Blood Sugar Should Eat Wild Rice Wild rice is becoming more popular around the world. Not only is the grain delicious, but its highly nutritious, and many scientists are studying to food to validate its wide range of proposed health benefits. Wild rice provide a great combination of fiber, antioxidants and minerals, that are essential for protecting against many diseases and health conditions. The grain is even great for the fight against diabetes. Studies show that wild rice have the ability to help balance sugar levels in the body. In a study published in the journal Nutrients in 2013, researchers suggested that switching out portions of starchy dietary carbohydrates for wild rice may help to reduce insulin resistance and improve other markers of health. In their study the scientists saw that when they replaced white rice for wild rice in the participants, it had the effect of reducing insulin resistance, and also reduced triglyceride. In other study, the scientists saw that even in a diet high in cholesterol and fat, wild rice was able to impose its healthy effects on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. The researchers suggested that the high levels of fiber, magnesium, and other essential minerals in wild rice help to regulate the metabolism. Wild rice has a nutty, rich flavor and can be used in wide variety of recipes, including salads, soups, pasta dishes, and stir-fries. The grain can be purchase in many health food stores around the world. Continue reading >>

Brown Rice Nutrition May Lower The Risk Of Diabetes & Heart Disease

Brown Rice Nutrition May Lower The Risk Of Diabetes & Heart Disease

Current: Brown Rice Nutrition May Lower the Risk of Diabetes & Heart Disease Brown Rice Nutrition May Lower the Risk of Diabetes & Heart Disease Dr. Axe on Facebook1842 Dr. Axe on Twitter37 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest786 Share on Email Print Article In moderation, brown rice can be a very nutritiousgluten-free carbohydrate and healthy rice choice overall. Brown rice nutrition doesnt have too many calories per serving, but thenutrient content certainly is up there, whether were talking brown rice eaten on its own or brown rice protein powder . Rice nutrition is actually an important topic since about half of the worlds inhabitants (especially East and Southeast Asia) is completely reliant on rice as a staple food in their daily diets. ( 1 ) Is rice healthy? The answer is not always. Refined carbohydrates like white rice are basically fake foods anddo nothing to promote the health of your body.So is white rice good for you? No, its stripped of its nutrients, leaving pretty much nothing but carbohydrates that enter the bloodstream like an injection of sugar. Brown rice nutrition, on the other hand, is loaded with vitamins and minerals as well as fiber and protein to balancethe carbs in brown rice. Scientific studies has even shown that brown rice nutrition canreduce the risk of developing diabetes as well as heart problems. Its also a safe choice for anyone following a gluten-free diet. 5 Health Benefits of Brown Rice Nutrition Brown rice has a large amount ofplant lignans, which help form plant cell walls. These lignans are also believed toprotect humans against various diseases, including heart disease . ( 2 ) Another great thing that brown rice is high in? Magnesium. Thismineral is absolutely vital to heart health, Continue reading >>

An Alternative To Rice For Diabetics

An Alternative To Rice For Diabetics

(From the author’s blog, “Behind the Bamboo Veil”) Day 1: Coming to terms At age 50, I discovered that I have become a diabetic. I didn’t really realize what it meant to be a diabetic, only that my blood sugar level was “higher than the norm.” What I understand, from the underpinnings of many subsequent consultations and conversations with my endocrinologist, is that once a diabetic, always a diabetic. My goal should be to control the blood sugar levels from reaching extreme highs. Yet as I struggle to maintain some form of equilibrium, it can happen that blood sugar levels may drop precariously low as well. So perhaps the right way to phrase it is that my goal should be to control the blood sugar levels from reaching extremes of highs or lows, period. Sigh, the horror stories of severe diabetes. From possible blindness to amputation due to gangrene and cuts that wouldn’t heal, from renal failure to kidney transplants to death due to multiple organ failure and cardiac arrest… Sigh, the paradox of diabetes. Weight gain—is it a symptom or a result of the condition? Sigh, the painful truth about diabetes, especially Type II diabetes mellitus: While genetics encourages a predisposition to it, diet and level of activity are the early determinants. So now that I am a certified diabetic, it really was pretty much of my own doing! Of course, nearly 20 years of therapy and psychiatric medication pushed me along and helped the condition blossom. Of course, that my mother died at 87 of complications that developed from diabetes put me at risk for developing the same disease. Of course, that I eat as much rice as a construction worker after a hard day must have given me more spare tires than a car had any right to have. Of course, that I drink very socially, and v Continue reading >>

Is Basmati Rice Good For Diabetics

Is Basmati Rice Good For Diabetics

With the rise of type 2 diabetes, there are many people looking for alternative foods that can help combat the effects of this disease. By eating the right food, people can help control the complications that result from diabetes and even lose weight to help reverse the threat to their health. Carbohydrates have been noted as the key nutrient in terms of controlling blood sugar levels. This is because when digested carbohydrates turn into glucose or sugar and enters the blood stream. By controlling the amount the is consumed, carbohydrates can effectively be used to keep blood sugar levels from spiking. One of the most interesting foods that have been cited as one that helps control the effects of diabetes is basmati rice. It is a food that is a good source of carbohydrates, but also contains a low amount of calories, a solid amount of proteins and fiber as well. However, is basmati rice the answer when it comes to the type of foods that those suffering from type 2 diabetes should consume? The Advantages of Basmati Rice There are a number of reasons why you should choose this type of rice to be part of your meals. One of the most important reasons is because of the type of carbohydrate that basmati rice is and how it affects your blood sugar levels. There are two types of carbohydrates, those that hit high on the glycemic index (GI) and those that have a low to moderate effect. The foods that have a high GI number are to be avoided while low to moderate GI amounts are acceptable. Basmati rice is a food that ranges from the low to moderate levels in terms of GI. That means it can be consumed during meals as long as other foods that have a higher GI count are left out so that the effect is not magnified. So, for example when you are eating steak you can have a serving of Continue reading >>

Which Is Better Choice For A Diabetic: Roti Or Rice

Which Is Better Choice For A Diabetic: Roti Or Rice

Rice & Roti are the staple foods in most parts of our country,no Indian meal is complete without any of these. Diabetics need to be careful of their dietary choices. Rice and chapati can be eaten by diabetics in moderate quantity. Rice & roti both have similar carbohydrate and caloric value, but they differ in their nutritional value because roti contains more fiber, proteins and minerals. Most commonly people use polished rice which looks white due to removal of fiber rich covering (bran & husk), with this process most of the micro-nutrients are lost. Brown rice is little high in fiber, which causes your body to digest slowly. Rice is easier to digest because of its starch content, whereas roti digests slowly. This promotes satiety and keeps you full for longer time, which is a big plus for diabetics in maintaining blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) is a comparative measure of a carbohydrate foods and their impact on blood sugars. A food with high GI raises blood sugar than foods with low or medium GI. The glycemic index of long grain white rice is around 73, the glycemic index of brown rice is about 68 and the glycemic index of whole wheat chapati is about 62, so whole wheat chapatiand brown rice are better choice than white rice for diabetics. People who are gluten intolerant can switch to brown rice. To meet all the requirements instead of avoiding completely they can use brown rice atone meal and whole wheat roti at another meal. For better results, consult your dietician to help chose the best staple food. Diabetes is not a disease it's a way of life! Many of you would agree that diabetes management reflects how well you balance and live your life Experts say diabetes is not only genetic but obesity and inactivity is leading to it in young people and is on the v Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. White Bread Refined starches — white bread, white rice, white pasta, and anything made with white flour — act a lot like sugar once the body starts to digest them. Therefore, just like sugar, refined starches interfere with glucose control and should be avoided by those with diabetes. Whole grains are a better choice because they’re richer in fiber and generally cause a slower, steadier rise in blood sugar. Instead of white bread or a bagel for breakfast, opt for a toasted whole grain English Muffin (topped with a slice of reduced-fat cheese or scrambled egg for protein). At lunch and dinner, replace white carbs with healthier whole grain options such as brown or wild rice, barley, quinoa, and whole-wheat bread to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. Even high-quality, whole grain starches elevate blood glucose to some degree, so it’s still important to limit portions — stick with ½ to ¾ cup cooked grains or just 1 slice of bread at meals. Continue reading >>

Brown Rice Instead Of White May Lower Diabetes Risk

Brown Rice Instead Of White May Lower Diabetes Risk

(Health.com) -- The next time you order Chinese food or need a side dish to serve with dinner, you're better off choosing brown rice instead of white. Eating more brown rice and cutting back on white rice may reduce your risk of diabetes, a new study reports. "People at risk of diabetes should pay attention to carbohydrates in their diet and replace refined carbohydrates with whole grains," says the lead author of the study, Dr. Qi Sun, M.D., a nutrition researcher at the Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston, Massachusetts. If you eat a little more than two servings of white rice (about 12 ounces) per week, switching to brown rice will lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 16 percent, Sun and his colleagues estimate. And if you replace those servings of white rice with whole grains in general, they estimate, your diabetes risk will decline even further, by 36 percent. White rice is produced by removing the husk-like outer layers of brown rice. Those discarded layers contain nutrients (such as magnesium and insoluble fiber) that have been shown to guard against diabetes, which may in part explain the study's findings, Sun says. White rice may also contribute to diabetes risk because it causes blood-sugar levels to rise more rapidly than brown rice does. (This is known as having a higher glycemic index.) Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body loses its sensitivity to insulin, a hormone that helps convert blood sugar (glucose) into energy. The result is that blood sugar, which is toxic at high levels, can creep into the danger zone. Eating lots of foods with a high glycemic index-- such as refined carbohydrates-- has been linked to diabetes risk in the past. "White rice is digested much faster and converted into sugar in your blood much quicker, so your bod Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Diet plays an important role in staying healthy, especially for people with diabetes. Many people wonder whether high-carbohydrate foods such as rice are healthy to eat. This article will explain how to count carbohydrates, how to incorporate rice into the diet, and what the healthy alternatives to rice are. Diabetes basics Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases where the body does not adequately produce insulin, use insulin properly, or both. Insulin plays a crucial role in allowing blood sugar to enter the cells and be used for energy. There are two main types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes have abnormally high levels of blood sugar. This can damage many organs in the body if left untreated. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommend the following steps to manage diabetes: making healthy choices in eating engaging in regular physical activity or exercise taking medications, if required A nutritious diet is important in keeping blood sugar levels at a healthy level. The healthy range is 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter mg/dL before meals or below 180 mg/dL after meals, according to the American Diabetes Association. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin. Various insulin delivery systems and protocols are used to manage blood sugar levels both between and at meal times. People with type 2 diabetes often manage their condition with diet and exercise, and with medications as needed to keep their blood sugar levels within the target range. These medications vary in how they work. People with diabetes will have different treatment plans, and they will respond to food, exercise, and medication differently. It is important that people consult with a doctor to get personalized recommendations on target blood suga Continue reading >>

More in diabetes