diabetestalk.net

Which Is Better Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes?

The Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

I realize this might be old news for all you veterans of diabetes out there, but I thought this week I might write a little bit about the key differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. I thought this might be helpful for newcomers to our “Diabetian community” (and let me say that while I’m sorry you find yourself with the diagnosis, we’re happy to welcome you here), or as a resource to share with friends and family who can often have a hard time understanding the differences. The understanding within the general public tends to be something along the lines of this: Diabetics can’t have sugar. That’s about it. So odds are pretty good that someone new to this disease is coming in with an idea that diabetes means you can’t ever have another cookie, but food without sugar is OK. And most of your friends and family will probably CONTINUE to think that well after you’ve gathered more information. Furthermore, the understanding of “Type 1” and “Type 2,” even among people who understand that there ARE two types, is often limited to age brackets — Type 1 is diabetes that starts when someone is young, Type 2 is what you get if you’re post-30. Or, more recently, Type 2 diabetes is linked solely to obesity, while Type 1 is…still diabetes for young people. Two diseases, one name An author of a study I once read pointed out that it’s rather unfortunate that we give the same name to these two diseases, because the mechanisms for how they work, AND the regimen for how we treat them, are very different. So then, without further ado, here is the lowdown on Type 1 diabetes, with Type 2 diabetes in a nutshell to come next week. Type 1 diabetes is the result of an immune system malfunction. A virus moves through our body, usually without us ever even kno Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes?

Question: What is the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes? Answer: There are several types of diabetes; I'm going to discuss the two main types: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 formerly called juvenile onset diabetes occurs typically before the age of 20. Individuals with type 1 diabetes are usually thin, and the cause of type 1 diabetes is that the pancreas, the organ that secretes insulin, is destroyed by autoantibodies, that's why people with type 1 diabetes always need insulin, either injected or through an insulin pump. Type 1 diabetes occurs in about 10-15 percent of all the diabetics in the country. Now, the most common type of diabetes is what we call type 2, formerly called adult onset. Type 2 diabetics are usually heavy, usually diagnosed after the age of 35. Now, the cause of type 2 diabetes is quite different from type 1. The cause of type 2 diabete is primarily a complicated medical condition called 'insulin resistance.' In fact, in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, there's plenty of insulin around, it just doesn't work well. To treat type 2 diabetes, we typically use lifestyle, and that may work alone -- just diet and exercise -- then we may need oral medications, and it is not uncommon for someone with type 2 diabetes to eventually need insulin, either with or without the oral medications. Now, type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately 85 to 90 percent of all the diabetics in the country. The other important thing that needs to be said is that type 2 diabetes is associated with heart disease, and that's why it's so important to not only treat the glucose levels, but also to attack blood pressure and cholesterol levels as well. We know that type 2 diabetes runs very strongly from generation to generation, and we also know that we can preve Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Type 1 Vs Type 2

Diabetes: Type 1 Vs Type 2

There are several types of diabetes, and the most common are split up into two types: Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 is in reference to a complete lack of insulin in the body, while Type 2 diabetes includes cases where the body either has too little insulin or is unable to properly utilize insulin. Types 1 and 2 diabetes have a few big differences, and also a few similarities. Let’s break down both. Basic Figures and Differences Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes cover all diabetes cases not related to pregnancy in women. Within these non-pregnancy cases, here are a few basic statistics: • Type 1 diabetes: Previously known as juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes, this is the less common of the two—it makes up about 5 to 10 percent of all diabetes cases. • Type 2 diabetes: Previously known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, this type of diabetes is responsible for about 90 to 95 percent of cases. In cases of Type 1 diabetes, it’s common for symptoms to begin quickly—often in weeks. In cases of Type 2 diabetes, however, it’s more typical for symptoms to develop slowly over a period of years. Many Type 2 cases don’t even show noticeable symptoms for years, and are only discovered during unrelated procedures. Type 1 diabetes is accompanied by episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), while Type 2 will not come with these episodes unless certain insulin or other medications are present. Finally, while Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented, Type 2 can be prevented or at least delayed through maintaining healthy weight, eating right and getting proper exercise. Causes Type 1 diabetes is caused directly by the immune system becoming compromised and attacking beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. It’s believed that Type 1 diabetes i Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Type 1 Vs. Type 2

Diabetes In Dogs: Type 1 Vs. Type 2

By Hanie Elfenbein, DVM Diabetes in dogs is not a death sentence. It takes dedication, but your dog can still live a long, happy life. Diabetes means that the body is unable to use glucose (sugar) appropriately. This leads to high levels of sugar in the blood, which can cause many health problems. Just like humans, our pets can get both Type I and Type II diabetes. Type I diabetes is also known as insulin-deficiency. It is due to the body's inability to produce insulin. Insulin is normally produced in the pancreas and is important in helping cells use glucose (sugar), the basic energy source. Our digestive systems are designed to turn food into glucose for cells to use. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into cells. People and animals with Type I diabetes need to be given insulin so that their body can use glucose. Type II diabetes is known as insulin resistant diabetes. It happens when the pancreas makes insulin but the body's cells do not respond to the insulin. Sometimes Type II diabetes can be reversed through weight loss and improvements in diet and exercise. In our companions, dogs are more likely to develop Type I diabetes while cats are more likely to develop Type II diabetes. Some diseases and medications can also cause Type II diabetes in dogs. Fortunately for the animals with Type II diabetes, some will recover through diet and exercise. Unfortunately, once your pet develops Type I diabetes, it is not reversible. Causes of Canine Diabetes In dogs, Type I diabetes is caused by destruction of insulin producing cells in the pancreas. These cells die as a result of inflammation of the pancreas, known as pancreatitis. Some dog breeds are predisposed to chronic pancreatitis and diabetes, including Keeshonds and Samoyeds. Like humans and cats, obese dogs are at ris Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Vs Type 2

Type 1 Diabetes Vs Type 2

National Diabetes Month is coming to a close. Unfortunately, diabetes isn’t going away any time soon. According to the American Diabetes Association, 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes each year. And 86 million people in the United States with prediabetes are headed towards developing Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes isn’t unique to the United States: It’s a global issue, affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Many people describe diabetes as being a pandemic. When people are diagnosed with diabetes, they often have many questions, especially about the differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. There are, in fact, multiple different forms of diabetes (too many to get into in this week’s posting!), but the more common forms are Type 1 and Type 2. Let’s take a look at these this week and hopefully clear up any confusion or questions you may have. Type 1 diabetes Name: Type 1 diabetes was formerly known as “juvenile diabetes” and “insulin-dependent diabetes.” These terms are inaccurate and obsolete. We know that it’s not just “juveniles” who get Type 1 diabetes — adults get Type 1, too, and many people who have Type 2 diabetes must take insulin. So, Type 1 diabetes is the correct term. Definition: Type 1 diabetes (also known as Type 1 diabetes mellutis, or T1DM) is an autoimmune condition. This means that the body’s immune system turns on itself; in this case, it attacks the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that produce insulin. As a result, the pancreas produces very little, if any, insulin. Causes: Scientists don’t exactly know what causes Type 1 diabetes. However, it’s likely that genetics and environmental factors, such as certain types of viruses, play a role. Prevalence: Type 1 diabetes accounts Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Can You Tell Type 1 And Type 2 Apart?

Diabetes Symptoms: Can You Tell Type 1 And Type 2 Apart?

Diabetes is a life-long condition that causes a person’s blood sugar level to rise too high. New research by healthcare provider Abbott into the country’s views on diabetes has found 43 per of UK adults can’t tell the two types apart, despite the fact they have significant differences. Type 1 is when the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin by mistake, damaging the pancreas and causing it to be unable to produce insulin and move it out of the bloodstream into cells. It is often inherited - if you have a close relative with it there’s a six per cent chance you’ll suffer too - and it can cause serious long-term health problems, including blindness, kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Type 2 is the most common, with 90 per cent of diabetes suffers in the UK falling into that category. Type 2, on the other hand, is when the body doesn't produce enough insulin - or the body's cells don't react to insulin - meaning that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. This type is commonly associated with obesity and old age, and triggers the same long-term health problems as type 1. According to the NHS, the second type is the most common, with 90 per cent of diabetes suffers in the UK falling into that category. Then there’s gestational diabetes - when women experience high levels of blood glucose during pregnancy - and pre-diabetes, the stage below full-blown diabetes when blood sugar is still above the normal range. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Symptoms are similar for any type of diabetes. These include being very thirsty, going Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1 And Type 2: How To Tell The Difference

Diabetes Type 1 And Type 2: How To Tell The Difference

The number of people living with diabetes in the UK has tipped over the 4 million mark for the first time, according to 2016 figures released by Diabetes UK. [Read more: Could you have diabetes? 5 hidden symptoms of diabetes that could mean you're suffering] But the good news is that because most of the 59.8% increase in diagnosis is in type 2 diabetes cases, simple diet and lifestyle changes can help reverse the trend. Diabetes UK says there are now a total of 3.6 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK, compared to nearly 2.1 million in 2005. However, many cases are type 2 diabetes, which is the form often linked to diet and obesity. And that means for some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle can control the illness, which is thought to be on the rise because of increasing obesity levels. Such a lifestyle includes losing weight if you're overweight, eating a healthy diet including lots of fruit and vegetables, and exercising. These measures can help reduce blood-sugar levels, and either reduce or even stop any diabetes symptoms. And while some people with type 2 diabetes need to take medication, making these healthy diet and lifestyle choices can mean they don't need to take their tablets any more. People with type 1 diabetes, however, will always need insulin injections. What's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? While both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood-sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that means sufferers are unable to produce the hormone insulin, which helps the body use glucose in the blood to produce energy. The immune system attacks insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, and people with type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

A fellow caregiver asked... How serious is type 2 diabetes, and is it less or more serious than type 1 diabetes? My mom, just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, keeps it under control without taking insulin. So is type 2 diabetes less of a problem than insulin-dependent type 1? Expert Answers No, definitely not. In fact, in some ways type 2 diabetes is a more serious disorder because your mom may have had it for years before she was diagnosed. So she may well have developed some of the long-term, debilitating complications linked to the condition without knowing it. In addition, since type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder without a cure, over time her body may not be able to produce insulin or use it as well as it does now, and she may wind up needing insulin injections or pills. A person with type1 diabetes ignores it for a day at his own peril. He'll likely end up in the emergency room because his body can't absorb glucose without a continuous supply of insulin via injection or an insulin pump. People with type 1 diabetes typically develop such severe symptoms over a short time in childhood or early adulthood that they're forced to deal with it. Type 2 diabetes is a sneakier condition: Its harmful health effects can slowly build for years until full-blown complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, or foot problems, make it impossible to ignore. Plus it often comes with its own set of problems. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes are frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure and cholesterol along with high blood sugar. This damaging threesome can lead to progressive thickening of the arteries and reduced blood flow, putting your mom at greater risk for a slew of complications including heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. If your mom is overweigh Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Tweet Whilst both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Confused over which type of diabetes you have? It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think. For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight. But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin. Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight. Because both types of diabetes can be so varied and unpredictable, it's often difficult to know which type of diabetes someone has. It's not safe to assume that an overweight person with high blood glucose levels has type 2 diabetes, because the cause of their condition might in fact be attributable to type 1. In some cases, when the type of diabetes is in doubt, your health team may need to carry out specialised tests to work out which type of diabetes you have. This way, they can recommend the most appropriate treatment for your diabetes. Common differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Despite the uncertainty that often surrounds a diagnosis of diabetes, there are a few common characteristics of each diabetes type. Please note that these differences are based on generalisations - exceptions are common. For instance, the perception of type 1 diabetes isn't strictly true: many cases are diagnosed in adulthood. This table should be seen as a rough guide to the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, rather than hard and fast rules. Co Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

On this page: Every day, two more Australian children and as many as six Australians of all ages develop type 1 diabetes, which makes it one of the most common serious diseases among children. Diabetes is a condition of the endocrine system (the system of glands that delivers hormones). To use glucose (blood sugar) for energy, the hormone insulin needs to be secreted by the pancreas, a gland located in the abdomen. A person with type 1 diabetes is unable to produce insulin. Treatment involves closely monitoring blood sugar levels, modifying diet and taking daily injections of insulin. Type 1 diabetes can affect anyone, but is more common in people under 30 years and tends to begin in childhood. Other names for type 1 diabetes have included juvenile diabetes and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Approximately one in every ten Australians with diabetes has type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is much more common in Australia than in other countries. The pancreas and type 1 diabetes The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates into glucose. This simple sugar is then transported to each cell via the bloodstream. The pancreas secretes the hormone insulin, which allows the glucose to migrate from the blood into the cells. Once inside a cell, the glucose is ‘burned’, along with oxygen, to produce energy. The pancreas of a person with type 1 diabetes doesn’t make enough insulin to keep blood glucose normal. Without insulin, the glucose remains in the bloodstream at high levels. The body recognises the problem and tries to provide the cells with other sources of fuel, such as stored fats. Extensive fat burning can release by-products called ketones, which are dangerous in high amounts. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes The symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: excessive t Continue reading >>

The Type 1 Versus Type 2 Diabetes War

The Type 1 Versus Type 2 Diabetes War

DiabetesHealth.com recently published “What People with Type 1 Diabetes can Learn from Type 2s.” Clay Wirestone, the author, set off a firestorm of comments, mostly from people with type 1 diabetes. Comments were in the vein of, “How dare you tell me I can learn something from those lazy, fat type 2s!” Here’s a sampling of comments: “I’m type 1, and... it aggravates me when people with type 2... whine. You know why? Because... I’m stuck on insulin for the rest of my life... I don’t want to hear complaining from people who have it easier than me. I have the world’s smallest violin playing for them. :)” “I have been a type 1 for 43 years. I have told my doctor... that I wish type 1 was called diabetes and type 2 was given a totally different name. They are NOT the same disease! Try and explain that to non-diabetics. Listen very carefully. I cannot take a day off. If I eat everything my dietitian suggests, I must still check my blood glucose four to seven times per day and take numerous injections ... How many type 2’s have been unconscious in the middle of the night due to low blood sugar?” “As a long-standing T1 (37 years — I was diagnosed in 1973 at the age of 17 months) AND as a Registered Nurse Certified Diabetes Educator, I am appalled... The author obviously has no idea what T1, or for that matter, T2 patients go through on a daily basis.The media needs to be scolded when they fail to define the differences between T1 & T2.” Shall we say Wirestone opened Pandora’s box. With the recent explosion of media coverage for type 2 diabetes, people with type 1 diabetes feel invisible, overlooked and are often blamed by an unknowing public for causing their own condition—eating ourselves into our disease. This isn’t the case for type 1, Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the problem of high levels of blood sugar. The inability to control blood sugar causes the symptoms and the complications of both types of diabetes. But type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are two different diseases in many ways. According to the latest (2014) estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Type 1 diabetes affects just 5 percent of those adults, with type 2 diabetes affecting up to 95 percent. Here’s what else you need to know to be health-savvy in the age of the diabetes epidemic. What Causes Diabetes? "Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease — the body's immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin," a hormone, says Andjela Drincic, MD, associate professor of internal medicine in the division of diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The exact cause is not known, but it's probably a combination of the genes a person is born with and something in the environment that triggers the genes to become active. "The cause of type 2 diabetes is multifactorial," says Dr. Drincic. "People inherit genes that make them susceptible to type 2, but lifestyle factors, like obesity and inactivity, are also important. In type 2 diabetes, at least in the early stages, there is enough insulin, but the body becomes resistant to it." Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a family history of the disease, a poor diet, a sedentary lifestyle, and obesity. African-Americans, Latin Americans, and certain Native American groups have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans. Juvenile or Adult-Onset: When Does Diabetes Start? Usually, type 1 diabetes in dia Continue reading >>

Type 1s Vs. Type 2s?

Type 1s Vs. Type 2s?

If you’ve read my books or blog entries, you know that I advocate people coming together to fight for health. But it seems some people with diabetes may fight each other instead of allying. A recent article on Diabetes Health, called “What People with Type 1 Diabetes Can Learn from Type 2s,” provoked dozens of mostly angry comments. “Type 1 is nothing like Type 2,” was the type of comment posted by many people with Type 1. One wrote, ” [Unlike people with Type 2], I cannot take a day off. If I eat everything my dietitian suggests, I must still check my blood glucose four to seven times per day and take numerous injections or bolus my pump. How many Type 2s have been unconscious in the middle of the night due to low blood sugar?” The source of the anger seems to be society’s prejudice against people with Type 2, the belief that the disease is their fault, that they could cure it with diet and exercise. Some of this nonsense is sloshing from Types 2s onto Type 1s because the public doesn’t know the difference between the two conditions. “Thanks to Type 2s, people who have Type 1 are a getting a ‘bad rap’,” one poster wrote. Some Type 1 victims of this prejudice resent it. “I wish these two different diseases didn’t go by the same name,” was a typical type of comment. The sad thing is that many people with Type 1 seem to have bought into the false idea that people with Type 2 are “doing it to themselves.” Their anger is understandable. Living with Type 1 is hard enough, and now everyone thinks you brought it on yourself, and most of the research money and publicity starts going into Type 2. There is also the perception that Type 2s don’t understand how hard it is to live with Type 1, with the dangers of hypos and all the matching of ca Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Vs. Type 2 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes Vs. Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes affects over 29 million people in the United States, and 1 in 4 of those affected are unaware that they have diabetes.[1] Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in younger people and occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body cannot use the insulin it produces. This disease, frequently related to obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, and genetics, is most often diagnosed in adults, but incidence rates are increasing among teens in America.[2][3] Comparison chart Type 1 Diabetes versus Type 2 Diabetes comparison chart Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes Definition Beta cells in pancreas are being attacked by body's own cells and therefore can't produce insulin to take sugar out of the blood stream. Insulin is not produced. Diet related insulin release is so large and frequent that receptor cells have become less sensitive to the insulin. This insulin resistance results in less sugar being removed from the blood. Diagnosis Genetic, environmental and auto-immune factors, idiopathic Genetic, obesity (central adipose), physical inactivity, high/low birth weight, GDM, poor placental growth, metabolic syndrome Warning Signs Increased thirst & urination, constant hunger, weight loss, blurred vision and extreme tiredness, glycouria Feeling tired or ill, frequent urination (especially at night), unusual thirst, weight loss, blurred vision, frequent infections and slow wound healing, asymptomatic Commonly Afflicted Groups Children/teens Adults, elderly, certain ethnic groups Prone ethnic groups All more common in African American, Latino/Hispanic, Native American, Asian or Pacific Islander Bodily Effects Beleived to be triggered autoimmune destruction of the beta cells; autoimmune attack may occur following a viral infection such as mumps, rubell Continue reading >>

Diabetes' Civil War

Diabetes' Civil War

As a person living with Type 1 diabetes, Angie Hashemi-Rad must prick her fingers and give herself insulin every day to stay alive. But nothing irritates her more than having people mistakenly assume she has Type 2 diabetes — and then suggest she "cure herself" by eating less sugar and exercising more. "I'm sorry, but I hate Type 2. I call it the wuss version," Hashemi-Rad, 34, wrote on diabetesdaily.com in response to an online article headlined: "Which is worse: Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes?" "NO TYPE 2 COULD EVER DO WHAT I HAVE DONE FOR THE PAST 28 YEARS," she wrote. "IT IS NOT THE SAME. NOT EVEN CLOSE. HOW DARE YOU." As rates of Type 2 diabetes soar, tempers are flaring in the diabetes blogosphere, where many people with Type 1 diabetes are lobbying for a new, distinct name for their condition in hopes of clearing up misconceptions and securing more resources to put toward a cure. With Type 2 diabetes — formerly known as "adult-onset diabetes"— people have trouble putting insulin to use in the body to metabolize dietary sugars. Obesity is a major risk factor, and diet, exercise and medication can help prevent the condition in people at risk or treat the disease once it develops. Type 1, by contrast, used to be called "juvenile diabetes" because it is often present from childhood. People with the condition produce no insulin and will die unless they regularly dose themselves with the hormone. Many people don't understand those differences, and because Type 2 diabetes is far more common it receives most of the attention. Type 1's often hear "You don't look like a diabetic!" or are assumed to have caused their illness by overeating. "Typically, people have no idea what diabetes is or how it works," said Chicago's Laura Fitzgerald, 21, who was diagnosed at age 6. "Th Continue reading >>

More in diabetes