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Which Fruits Are Good For Diabetic Pregnant?

Diet For Pregnant Women With Diabetes (gestational Diabetes)

Diet For Pregnant Women With Diabetes (gestational Diabetes)

Foods to eat with gestational diabetes – this list of foods will help keep your blood sugar level in a healthy range. Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cell use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby’s health. When you are pregnant, your body naturally becomes more resistant to insulin so that more glucose is available to nourish your body. For most mom-to-be, this isn’t a problem. When your body needs additional insulin to process excess glucose in the blood, the pancreas secretes more. But if the pancreas can’t keep up with the increased demand for insulin during pregnancy, blood sugar levels rise too high because the cells aren’t using the glucose. This results in gestational diabetes. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there’s a good news. Expectant mums can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising, and if necessary, taking medications. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. If you have gestational diabetes, your baby doesn’t have an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes during childhood. However, your child is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life as well as be overweight throughout life. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you are at risk for type 2 diabetes. You’ll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems such as: The baby growing larger than usual which may lead to difficulties during the delivery Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

1 / 10 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy With a Gestational Diabetes Diet Pregnancy already comes with a long list of things that you should and shouldn’t do to achieve the best outcomes for you and your baby. But if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes (diabetes that develops during pregnancy), then you need to learn some more dos and don’ts to keep your blood sugar under control and make sure that diabetes doesn’t harm your pregnancy. You will need to learn about a gestational diabetes diet — foods and lifestyle habits that help stabilize your blood sugar — as well as, possibly, gestational diabetes treatment. This may include diabetes medications your doctor prescribes during pregnancy to keep your blood glucose under control. It is possible to have a healthy pregnancy with gestational diabetes, but you must take care of yourself to reduce your risk of the following: An overly large baby Cesarean delivery (C-section) Miscarriage Preeclampsia (pregnancy-related high blood pressure) Preterm delivery Stillbirth Other poor health outcomes for your baby Long-term health effects for you Controlling your blood glucose is important for everyone, young and old. But for pregnant women, good blood sugar control is important before, during, and after pregnancy to reduce the chance of diabetes complications. According to the Mayo Clinic, good blood sugar control during pregnancy can help prevent or reduce these risks: Prevent complications for the baby Prevent complications for the mother Reduce the risk of birth defects Reduce the risk of excess fetal growth Reduce the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth Reduce the risk of premature birth To keep blood glucose under control during pregnancy, it’s important to check your blood sugar level frequently. If you are Continue reading >>

Fruit And Diabetes - Can I Eat Fruit?

Fruit And Diabetes - Can I Eat Fruit?

Tweet Along with vegetables, fruit is one of the healthiest food groups and contains an important source of vitamin C which helps to keep our cells healthy. Can someone with diabetes eat fruit? People with diabetes can eat fruit. However, fruit can be quite sugary so bear this in mind to prevent blood sugar levels rising too high Daily recommendations of fruit The Department of Health advises us to consume at least 5 portions of fruit or vegetables a day. The American Diabetes Associations recommends fruit as a good option if you’re having a dessert. Effect on diabetes Fruit is naturally quite high in sugars and fruit will typically have more carbohydrate than non-starchy vegetables. Some fruits are more sugary than others. For example, banana and oranges are examples of more sugary fruits whereas berries are examples of less sugary fruits. You may find therefore that you need to choose smaller portions of certain fruits depending on your blood glucose levels. Fruit juices and smoothies typically contain a lot of fruit sugar so exercise caution with how much fruit juice you consume. Health benefits of fruit Fruit helps to supply us with fibre, minerals and vitamins, and they are particularly high in their supply of vitamin C. Vitamin C is important for preventing our cells being damaged. Fibre helps digestion and is linked with helping reduce cholesterol levels. As with vegetables, different fruit have different characteristics. For example grapefruit contains a healthy amount of vitamin A and potassium whereas berries are good sources of vitamin K and manganese. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention note that eating the recommended quantity of fruit and vegetables may reduce susceptibility to chronic disease and cancers. Which fruits are lowest in carbs? Continue reading >>

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Why do I have to watch what I eat? Eating well is an important way to stay healthy for all women in pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes (GD), choosing the right food is especially important. When you eat, your digestive system breaks most of your food down into a type of sugar called glucose. Glucose is one of your body’s main sources of energy. Glucose enters your bloodstream and then, with the help of insulin (a hormone made by your pancreas), your cells use the glucose as fuel. However, if your body doesn't produce enough insulin – or your cells have a problem responding to the insulin – too much glucose stays in your blood, instead of moving into the cells and getting converted to energy. Pregnancy hormones reduce the effect of insulin, so your body has to make more of it. If your body can't keep up with the demands for insulin, your blood sugar levels can get too high. That's when GD happens. It's important to control it, as it can lead to problems for your baby. You may be able to control GD by changing what you eat and combining a healthy diet with regular exercise. Learn all about gestational diabetes, including risk factors, symptoms to watch out for, and how it's managed. How will I have to change my diet? If you’ve been diagnosed with GD, your doctor should refer you to a dietitian who can work out a special diet for you. Every pregnancy is different, so what works for one woman may not work for you. You’ll probably need to experiment with different foods and combinations of foods before you work out what’s best for your body. Your dietitian will be able to help you with this. Women with GD say the foods they can tolerate often change as their pregnancy progresses, which can be frustrating. Others say their Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Have Diabetes? 7 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

Dealing with disease and pregnancy Pregnancy is full of challenges—and even more so if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. So how do you handle a demanding disease and pregnancy? It may not be as hard as you think, says Cheryl Alkon, author of Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes. But you do need a plan. Before starting a family, check out these 7 tips that can help you ace diabetes management and have a healthy pregnancy. Get your blood sugar under control If you're thinking about getting pregnant, you need to kick bad habits (like smoking), lose weight (if you're overweight), and take prenatal vitamins. You can add one more item to the list if you have diabetes: Get your blood sugar under control. If your blood sugar levels are too high or too low, you may have a tough time getting pregnant. "In that case, your body may recognize that it's not a hospitable place for a pregnancy," says Alkon. Women with type 2 diabetes are particularly at risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which can also make it difficult to get pregnant. Medications that stimulate ovulation, such as Clomid and Serophene, can help. Assemble a diabetes team Pregnant women with diabetes could have up to three times as many appointments as women at a lower risk of complications. Find a high-risk obstetrician to monitor your pregnancy and check whether your endocrinologist is willing to work with your ob-gyn. "You want doctors who really know what diabetes is all about," says Alkon. The constant monitoring, ultrasounds, and additional blood sugar tests add up. So "make sure you know the ins and outs of your insurance plan," she adds. Consider going off oral medications Most doctors suggest that pregnant women with type 2 diabetes discontinue oral medications, says Alkon. This is because Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating Guidelines For Women With Gestational Diabetes

Healthy Eating Guidelines For Women With Gestational Diabetes

Introduction Gestational diabetes (GDM) can happen during pregnancy as hormone levels in your body change. These changes affect how your body manages glucose (sugar). GDM makes it harder for your body to control your blood glucose and increases your risk for type 2 diabetes and other health conditions later in life. Eating a healthy, well balanced diet, managing your weight gain and being physically active can help control your blood glucose and give you and your baby the nutrients you need for a healthy pregnancy. Ask your health care provider to refer you to a diabetes clinic in your community. The dietitian and rest of the health care team will help you to plan a healthy diet that works for you and to have a healthy pregnancy. The information in this handout can help you to get started. Steps You Can Take Eat regular, balanced meals and snacks. Enjoy three meals and three snacks spaced evenly throughout the day. Include at least three food groups in a meal and two food groups for a snack. Eat one of your snacks at bedtime. A balanced diet contains foods with carbohydrates, protein and healthy fats. Carbohydrates raise your blood glucose levels. Read on to learn which carbohydrates are the healthiest choices for you. Carbohydrate is found in grain products, fruit and fruit juice, some vegetables, milk and alternatives, dried beans, peas and lentils, and foods such as cakes, cookies, squares, candy and sugary drinks. Choose fibre-rich sources of carbohydrates like whole grain breads and cereals, and dried beans, peas and lentils. Fibre slows carbohydrate absorption into your blood. Choose vegetables and fruit rather than juice. Choose low glycemic index (GI) foods more often. Low GI foods raise blood glucose at a slower rate than high GI foods. See Additional Resources Continue reading >>

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that only occurs in pregnant women. That means you can't get gestational diabetes unless you’re pregnant. You may develop gestational diabetes for the first time during pregnancy or you might have a mild undiagnosed case of diabetes that gets worse when you’re pregnant. During pregnancy, the way your body uses insulin changes. Insulin is a hormone that breaks the foods you eat down into glucose, or sugar. You then use that glucose for energy. You’ll naturally become more resistant to insulin when you’re pregnant to help provide your baby with more glucose. In some women, the process goes wrong and your body either stops responding to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin to give you the glucose you need. When that happens, you’ll have too much sugar in your blood. That causes gestational diabetes. If you have recently been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, or are curious about what will happen if you are diagnosed with it, keep reading to learn more about maintaining a healthy pregnancy. Eat protein with every meal. Include daily fruits and vegetables in your diet. Thirty percent or less of your diet should be made up of fat. Limit or avoid processed foods. Pay attention to portion sizes to avoid overeating. If you have gestational diabetes, maintaining a healthy, balanced diet may help you manage your symptoms without needing medication. In general, your diet should include protein plus the right mix of carbohydrates and fats. Once you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, ask your doctor about working with a registered dietitian or nutritionist. They can help you plan your meals and come up with an eating plan that will keep you and your baby healthy. Aim to base your meals around protein. Include lots of fresh foods a Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

Common Questions About Gdmâ Mealâ Plans

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S Which foods are considered carbohydrates? For your meal plan, only a few types of foods are counted as carbs — starches, fruits, dairy, and non-starchy vegetables. The Food Finder chart on page 3 gives examples and portion sizes for these types of foods. Should I aim for a very low carb diet — like the Atkins diet? No. You (and your baby) need carbohydrates to stay healthy. Follow your meal plan to know when and how much carbohydrate to include in your meals and snacks. Do I need to count calories? It depends. Some women with GDM need to count calories, but many others don’t. Your meal plan will list all of the targets you need to aim for — and your healthcare provider can answer any questions. How do I know if my eating plan is working to control my GDM? A healthcare provider will show you how to test your blood glucose several times a day. Your testing results will show how well your GDM is controlled and whether your treatment should be adjusted. You’ll also be checked during your regular prenatal visits. Use the Food Finder meal planner to help you control your GDM, nourish your growing baby, and keep you feeling good. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) Meal Plan Why do I need a GDM meal plan? If you have gestational [je-STEY-shuhn-uhl] diabetes mellitus (GDM), you and your developing baby are likely to have high blood glucose (too much glucose — or “sugarâ€â€” in the blood). This can cause problems for both of you during the pregnancy, during delivery, and in the years to come. Following a meal plan is one of the most important ways to help control your blood glucose and lower health risks. Your healthcare provider will help you decide on a Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Meal plan You need to eat and drink at least 12 carbohydrate choices each day. Most women need 14 carbohydrate choices each day to maintain the desired weight gain of one-half pound each week. If you follow a vegetarian diet, you need 15 to 16 carbohydrate choices each day to get enough nutrients. At breakfast, include: 2 to 3 carbohydrate choices (30 to 45 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At lunch, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely At dinner, include: 3 to 4 carbohydrate choices (45 to 60 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For a morning snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an afternoon snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely For an evening snack, include: 1 to 2 carbohydrate choices (15 to 30 grams) protein (meat, poultry, fish, eggs, cheese, peanut butter) vegetable or fat, freely Breakfast tips Blood glucose is hard to control in the morning when the hormones that boost your blood glucose levels are released. To help, follow these breakfast tips: Eat a small breakfast. Eat whole-grain bread products. Eat a food that has protein. Do not eat cereal or fruit. Do not drink fruit juice at breakfast or any other time of the day. Fruit juice raises your blood glucose very quickly. Completing a meal plan Vegetables Most vegetables do not raise blood glucose. Vegetables supply many nutrients for both you and your baby. Try to eat at least four servi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet Regulations And Menu Plan

Gestational Diabetes Diet Regulations And Menu Plan

If you have gestational diabetes, your practitioner has probably already told you that you'll have to pay extra attention to your diet. Not sure how to best go about that? It'll help to talk to a certified diabetes educator (CDE) who has experience in gestational diabetes and who will be able to show you how to select the right foods and design the best eating plan for your needs. Some key points to remember each day: Choose complex carbohydrates (such as whole grains and beans) over simple ones (like white rice and white bread) Opt for lean proteins over fatty ones Eat lots of fruits and veggies Stick to fat-free or low-fat dairy foods whenever possible Eat snacks throughout the day (to maintain your blood sugar level) Steer clear of processed sugars The following is an example menu of what you might eat in one day to meet your nutritional needs if you have gestational diabetes. The total number of calories comes out to 2089, and it features a moderate amount of diabetes-friendly carbohydrate foods, such as whole grains, legumes, and fruits and has many snacks sprinkled throughout the day. Continue reading >>

Healthy Foods To Eat To Lower Blood Sugar While Pregnant

Healthy Foods To Eat To Lower Blood Sugar While Pregnant

High blood sugar levels during pregnancy can lead to gestational diabetes, putting you and your developing baby at risk. During pregnancy, your body makes more insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels, but sometimes you don’t produce enough. Gestational diabetes may cause your baby to have breathing difficulties, jaundice, low blood sugar and obesity later in life. It puts you at risk for having a larger baby, which can lead to problems in the delivery room and high blood pressure. With diet and exercise, you may be able to control your blood sugar levels without taking insulin or medication. Video of the Day Carbohydrate-containing foods are ranked by how they affect your blood sugar levels, which is known as the glycemic index. High-glycemic index foods digest rapidly, raising blood sugar levels. They are usually refined and processed, such as white breads and rice, baked goods and many breakfast cereals. Low-glycemic index foods take longer to digest and help you avoid spikes in blood sugar. These are whole, natural foods like beans, seeds, whole grains such as oatmeal and barley, and fruits and vegetables. During pregnancy, avoid refined and processed foods and stick to whole foods. Clinical nutritionist Stella Metsovas told the Mom.me website that she recommends eating foods rich in probiotics. Probiotics are live bacteria, similar to the friendly bacteria in your stomach, that promote digestive health. Friendly bacteria regulate metabolism of carbohydrates, which keeps your blood sugar levels in a healthy range. Metsovas suggests eating kimchee. You can also opt for natural yogurt with active cultures, but steer clear of those with extra sugar and corn syrup, which will counteract the benefits of the probiotics. Fiber is listed on a nutrition label under c Continue reading >>

Fruits During Pregnancy: The Good, The Bad, And The Unhealthy

Fruits During Pregnancy: The Good, The Bad, And The Unhealthy

It's wise for expecting mothers to watch what they eat, but what about fruit? All About Women physicians discuss which fruits to eat during your pregnancy, and which fruits to avoid. When it comes to a pregnancy diet, it can feel like the restrictions never end: no caffeine, seafood, deli meat, etc. Women should certainly be cautious about what goes into their bodies because it's very possible that a baby's growth and development could be negatively affected by certain foods and drinks. Fruits can provide women with a plethora of healthy vitamins and minerals that can be very beneficial for a newborn child; however, some fruits carry risks when they are eaten during a pregnancy. Read on to learn which fruits should and should not be eaten while you are pregnant. Fruits are super, that's for sure! They provide vitamins and minerals that can help your baby along throughout your pregnancy. Pregnant mothers require foods rich in fiber, potassium, vitamin A and C, folic acid, and other nutrients in order to keep their bodies strong until baby arrives, and fruits can be an excellent and easy source. Good Fruits for Pregnancy Without further ado, here are some wonderful healthy fruits to eat while pregnant: Apples are very high in fiber, which can help regulate a woman's digestion and prevent hemorrhoids – a common issue that many pregnant women face. Citrus fruits like lemons and oranges are chock full of vitamin C. Vitamin C is responsible for helping your baby's bones grow properly. Citrus can also help with a woman's digestion and deter morning sickness during pregnancy. Bananas are a wonderful source of potassium. Potassium can help greatly with regulating the fluid and blood pressure in a woman's body and preventing leg cramps or pain during the later stages of a pregn Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet Plan

Gestational Diabetes Diet Plan

Is orange juice good for gestational diabetes? Expectant mothers who tend to experience a rise in blood sugar levels are said to have gestational diabetes. This form of diabetes poses a threat to the unborn child and could cause a great amount of devastation. One of the best recommended methods of bringing gestational diabetes under control is through the consumption of oranges. Orange juice for gestational diabetes has been recommended because the sugar content of the fruit occurs naturally and can be easily processed by the body. Besides this, the pectin in the fruit breaks down the sugar in the body, lowering the level of blood sugar by a considerable amount. Although orange juice and gestational diabetes have been linked with each other, it is always advisable to check with your doctor before consuming anything that contains sugars. You must remember that all your actions will have an effect on your baby and diabetes could cause major damage to the fetus within your womb. Orange drinks during gestational diabetes must be completely natural and without any additives, to ensure that the product consumed contains no added sugars or color. Remember to consume orange juices at intervals so that the body is not put through the strain of processing large amounts of sugar at one time. Continue reading >>

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

I've Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes – What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks: more clinic appointments, more blood tests, taking medications, being more active and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be, “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. And then, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate, too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. This may come as a surprise, but you don’t have to go on a special diet when have gestational diabetes. Depending on your current diet, you may have to eat less of some foods and more of others. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a list of foods they weren't allowed to eat, or often told to simply cut out sugar. Nowadays, you may need to make some changes to your diet, but it’s not a case of cutting things out. Rather, you’ll need to follow the same healthy, balanced diet that’s recommended to everyone. The main aim for managing gestational diabetes is ensuring that your blood glucose levels are under control, so your healthcare team will discuss targets that are right for you. Achieving the targets will increase your chances of having a healthy pregnancy and your food choices play a vital role in this. It is important to enjoy your meals while making changes to your food choices that are realistic and achievable. This will help control your blood glucose levels, and help prevent excessive weight gain during your pregnancy. All carbohydrates will ha Continue reading >>

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