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Which Footballers Have Diabetes?

Championship Footballer And Father To A Child With Type 1 Diabetes Richard Wood Speaks To Jdrf

Championship Footballer And Father To A Child With Type 1 Diabetes Richard Wood Speaks To Jdrf

Championship footballer and father to a child with type 1 diabetes Richard Wood speaks to JDRF Championship footballer and father to a child with type 1 diabetes Richard Wood speaks to JDRF When I see what my son goes through every day people should know about it. Rotherham United football star Richard Wood has spoken to JDRF about why the charity is so close to his heart and of his hope to raise awareness of type 1 diabetes . The defender has a personal connection to type 1 diabetes his eight year old son Jenson lives with the condition. Richard is hoping to raise more awareness as an ambassador for JDRF. He and his teammates at the south Yorkshire club have previously posed in blue JDRF t-shirts before a match with Wolverhampton Wanderers last season. JDRF spoke to Richard about how he helps Jenson manage his type 1 and the balancing act of doing this and traveling across the country as a professional footballer. I go to every match concerned about Jensons type 1. In fact, every day I go into training I think and worry about how he will be. I dont think that will ever change but, luckily, he has a great mum who I have complete trust in and looks after Jenson really well. When asked about the days immediately after Jenson was diagnosed with type 1, Richard said: We had no knowledge of type 1 but learned very quickly what type 1 is and that its not the be all and end all. We got to grips with it straight away. As a footballer with my lifestyle I have an understanding of energy, glucose and carbohydrates so am quite switched on with things like that. I read up on it straight away and what I needed to do to improve my sons life with type 1. I knew in those first few weeks I needed to learn as much as I could and thats what we all did. In August Richard was joined at Roth Continue reading >>

Nfl Players With Diabetes: Jay Cutler | Diabetic Connect

Nfl Players With Diabetes: Jay Cutler | Diabetic Connect

Jay Cutler discusses his struggles with diabetes while playing professional football. Despite the hardships that come with diabetes , many professional athletes have made it all of the way to the National Football League. Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2008, while he was playing with the Denver Broncos. Cutler said at that age (24), he ate whatever he liked and lived however he wanted. But as he got older, he realized the huge role diet plays in one's life. "It's a little overwhelming to get that news and realize you're going to have to completely change your life," Cutler told NFL.com. Cutler has since changed his diet over the years to help him cope with the disease, cutting out carbohydrates and sweets and trying to stick to things like protein and fruits. "Diabetes is all about insulin levels and sugar levels and what you put in your body," he said on "The Jay Cutler Show" on ESPN 1000. "The more you put in your body the more you have to regulate it with insulin. So later kickoffs you're talking about breakfast, lunch and a pregame meal, so that's more food you've got to be aware of and what you put in your body. A noon game, light breakfast, a little fruit and some insulin and I'm good to go." The quarterback explained how diabetes isn't something you can shake off like a slow defense. The blood glucose disease is there when you go to sleep at night and wake up in the morning, making proper glucose monitoring key. In 2007, the 6-foot-3-inch Cutler started the season at 235 pounds and played his last game at 202 pounds - he just couldn't keep weight on. But that didn't stop him from having a quality season, throwing 3,497 yards for 20 touchdowns and maintaining an 88.1 passer rating. He said he never worried about his car Continue reading >>

Athletes With Diabetes: How Jay Cutler Tackles Type 1

Athletes With Diabetes: How Jay Cutler Tackles Type 1

Pro-bowler and NFL quarterbackJay Cutler is a shining example of how to successfully manage diabetes andachieve greatness Think diabetes can stop you from becoming a pro-football player? Think again. Jay Cutler is one of many professional athletes who is proving that even though diabetes is a game-changer, its not the end-game. Cutler had an exceptional track record before receivinghis T1D diagnosis. He led his Vanderbilt University team past the University of Tennessee for a 2824 win in their 2005 season, the first since 1982, in addition to being one of the Commodores greatest offensive players of all time. As the third-best quarterback in the 2006 NFL draft, Cutler was picked up by the Denver Broncos he was at the top of his game. But in 2007, while with the Broncos, he experienced significant, unexplained weight loss and reported feelings of fatigue in the 2007 season. In April of 2008, at age 25, Jay Cutler received a type one diabetes diagnosis. I was aware I was having an issue one time last year against Kansas City. It was early in the game, first or second series, and I just didnt feel rightI felt out of it a little, shaky. What does a NFL quarterback do when given a T1D diagnosis? I went the whole summer just kind of dealing with it and figuring it out, test driving insulins to see what worked, what didnt work, what my numbers were, Cutler told ESPN . Jay had to adjust quickly to blood sugar testing. How does a newly diagnosed T1D maintain diabetes while playing a NFL game? I try to enter the game in the 80s knowing that when the game starts and adrenaline kicks in that I will jump up 20 to 30 points. Throughout the gameI monitor & check my sugars periodically to make sure Im still in a healthy range. Despite this major life change, Cutler was named player of Continue reading >>

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

If you’re an athlete who has Type-1 diabetes, you know how important it is to keep your blood sugar under excellent control. Blood sugar levels have a direct impact on strength, speed, stamina, flexibility and healing capabilities – all essential components of success in sport and fitness activities. There have been many athletes with diabetes who have excelled in their chosen sport (see athletes with diabetes list at bottom of page). But it isn’t without its challenges. Different forms of exercise can have very different effects on blood sugar, particularly when adrenal hormones start to kick in. Recovery from an exercise session may take blood sugar levels to strange and exotic places. What’s more, around-the-clock control is necessary for maintaining appropriate hydration and energy stores for athletic performance. Integrated Diabetes Services is led by one of the few certified diabetes educators who also happens to be a masters-level exercise physiologist. While not exactly a “world-class” athlete, Gary Scheiner participates and competes in a wide variety of sports and fitness activities. He served on the Board of Directors for the Diabetes Exercise & Sports Association for many years (now Insulindependence), and advises athletes and exercise enthusiasts with diabetes worldwide. In 2006 he received the Julie Betshart Award for the study of exercise and diabetes by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. He continues to speak nationally and internationally for both patients and healthcare professionals on exercise, diabetes and blood sugar control. Through his personal and professional experiences, Gary has helped athletes at all levels to incorporate new techniques for controlling blood sugar and enhancing athletic performance. He and his team of Continue reading >>

Professional Footballer With Type 1 Diabetes Swaps Shin Pads For A Onesie

Professional Footballer With Type 1 Diabetes Swaps Shin Pads For A Onesie

Professional footballer with type 1 diabetes swaps shin pads for a onesie Professional footballer with type 1 diabetes swaps shin pads for a onesie Southend United footballer Ben Coker has thrown his backing behind JDRF and the #TypeOnesie campaigndonninga onesie to support type 1 diabetes research. The left-back, who lives with type 1 diabetes, is one of the most high-profile figures in the football world living with the condition and has previously spoken of why raising awareness of type 1 is so important as well as of his shock when he was diagnosed aged 15. In an interview in the Daily Mail in September this year, Ben, who is originally from Hertfordshire but has plied his trade with Southend since 2013, spoke of his previous fears that the condition might affect his career. Speaking to the Mail he said: My first question was: Will I still be able to play football? At the time, I was playing a lot of football; 12 hours of training a week and a match on Saturdays and trying for a soccer apprenticeship. I couldnt take the risk of a hypo. Ben, 26, has shown that his condition has not held him back, as he has gone on to make just short of 100 appearances for Southend. A hero to footie-mad children living with the condition across the country, Ben was diagnosed at the age of 15 and has never looked back. Upon posing in an animal onesie (the exact creature he dressed as is a source of much debate) Ben tweeted: Dont I look one-derful as a #TypeOnesie?! [Im] proud to be supporting JDRF and type 1 diabetes research! The #TypeOnesie campaign has received support from schools, offices and individuals from across the country, and Ben joins other high-profile JDRF supporters including TV personality and Hairy Biker, Si King and rugby professional Chris Pennell in donning a ones Continue reading >>

The Real Madrid Player With Type 1 Diabetes

The Real Madrid Player With Type 1 Diabetes

The Real Madrid Player with Type 1 Diabetes Nacho Fernndez, diagnosed at age 11, opens up about his Type 1 diagnosis, and how he feels it has shaped his career as a pro athlete. Real Madrid defender Nacho Fernndez was told at the age of 12 that he would have to give up his aspirations of having a soccer career because of his Type 1 diabetes. Nacho (aka Jos Ignacio Fernndez Iglesias), joined Real Madrids youth system at the age of 11 with a clear goal in mind to one day play for one of the most historic and successful sports franchises in the world. But according to a UEFA.com profile, just a year later he had to miss a Real Madrid tournament for a hospital trip. There he met a doctor who said he couldnt play soccer anymore. Luckily, an endocrinologist told him the opposite a few days later, and now he plays at the highest level for one of the most elite soccer clubs in the world. Since his first call-up to the professional level in 2011, Nacho has appeared in 118 games and scored five goals, with three of them coming in the 2016-17 season. Nacho has been very open about his condition and the challenges he faces on a day-to-day basis. In the same UEFA.com profile, Nacho said he has had to take care of himself three times more than a normal person. But he believes managing his diabetes care has in some ways made him more responsible than the average athlete. In a sport such as soccer that requires intense conditioning and cardiovascular endurance, consistently monitoring glucose levels is paramount to staying on the field and preventing serious injury. Even the adrenaline rush of playing in front of thousands of screaming fans can greatly impact blood sugar levels. Nacho seems to not get enough of the challenge. He even participates in other endurance sporting events, li Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Football Players

Diabetes Mellitus In Football Players

SPORT and soccer to be specific can be so diverse in terms of the medical requirements both on and outside the pitch. As I watched the Green Buffaloes versus Mighty Mufulira Wanderers on May 24, one of my good friends David Simusamba raised some questions on various issues regarding football players. It is the same day when I reflected on the issue of sudden cardiac deaths (SCD) in football and challenged many soccer teams to come up with basic requirements to address emergencies occurring on the field of play. The topic which David raised was the issue of diabetes. I specifically want to tackle the issues relating to low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) in sports men. I will not discuss the subject of diabetes mellitus in general, but will try to narrow down and try to explain the implications of having a low and high blood sugar level in a diabetic sports man. After having looked at some of the important features and the actual definition of diabetes mellitus sometime back, it is important to consider the effects of a low and a high blood sugar level in a diabetic sports man. This subject is of importance and I will only try to highlight some of the important aspects relating to this condition and sport. It must be appreciated from the public health point of view that our country has not been spared in terms of an increase in the number of persons suffering from diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as sugar disease. It should also be a reminder to many readers to realise that exercise has a role to play in the management and general treatment of diabetes. The important thing is to actually know what things are linked to diabetes mellitus in terms of the causes. Diabetes Mellitus has been known to have a genetic predisposition i.e. Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Joins National Football League Players Association As A 2017 Strategic Charity Partner

American Diabetes Association Joins National Football League Players Association As A 2017 Strategic Charity Partner

American Diabetes Association Joins National Football League Players Association as a 2017 Strategic Charity Partner New partnership aims to increase urgency around diabetes epidemic, and to expand prediabetes and type 2 diabetes prevention efforts Building on the 2016 launch of Team Tacklean initiative bringing together current and former professional football players to raise awareness about diabetesthe American Diabetes Association (Association) has been named a 2017 Strategic Charity Partner of the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA). The partnership will focus on the prevention and management of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and will support all people affected by diabetes. The partnership will extend the Association's mission work through education, resources and programs targeting populations most at-risk of developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Eighty-six million Americans have prediabetes, and ninety percent of Americans with prediabetes do not even know they have it. In addition, African Americans and Hispanics are almost twice as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites to develop type 2 diabetes. The Association and the NFLPA are joining forces to address these staggering statistics. This new Strategic Charity Partnership focuses on raising awareness specifically for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes risk factors, particularly in minority communities. Elements of the partnership include collaborating on on-going prevention education campaigns, engaging Team Tackle in the Association's community events, Association participation in NFLPA's Health Awareness Month and providing on-going diabetes education to NFLPA members. In 2016, the Association launched Team Tackle by bringing 34 active and retired professional football players Continue reading >>

The Athletes Who Have Triumphed Over Type 1 Diabetes

The Athletes Who Have Triumphed Over Type 1 Diabetes

The athletes who have triumphed over type 1 diabetes Aidan Broddell first displayed symptoms of diabetes when he was 10 Talk of sport and Type 1 diabetes may evoke memories of Gary Mabbutt, the former Tottenham Hotspurdefender who represented his country at the highest level and lifted the UEFA Cup and FA Cup, twice, whilst often having to inject himself with insulin at half-time. But while the physical demands of diabetes are known to many sports fans, the battles that sufferers experience off the pitch, dealing with the psychological repercussions of their condition,are in need of greater recognition. Of the estimated fourmillion people with diabetes in the UK, 10 per centhave Type 1. This means they cannot produce insulin, instead having to self-administer the energy source either though injections or a pump. Its an essential, dailyroutine that can have debilitating emotional side-effects. Research by Diabetes.org.uk shows that people with Type 1 are twice as likely to suffer from depression and more prone to anxiety and eating disorders. But very few diabetics get access to the psychological support they need. Since men in particular struggle to ask for help, young athletes such as Exeter Chiefs' England rugby international Henry Slade , 22, and Southend United footballer Ben Coker , 25, are now encouraging diabetes sufferers to tackle depression head on. Southend United's Ben Coker developed diabetes when he was 15Credit:SNAP With diabetes, you are living with it 24/7, 365 days a year and yet you might just get a couple of hours with your GP each year to discuss it, explains Coker, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 15. When I was first diagnosed my biggest worry was that I may not be able to play football again, he says. Thankfully, the experts Continue reading >>

Madrid's Nacho On Diabetes: 'i Was Told My Footballing Days Were Over'

Madrid's Nacho On Diabetes: 'i Was Told My Footballing Days Were Over'

UEFA Champions League - Madrid's Nacho on diabetes: 'I was told my footballing days were over' - News Madrid's Nacho on diabetes: 'I was told my footballing days were over' In November, Real Madrid defender Nacho revealed that he had been diabetic since childhood. Here he talks about the fear that accompanied the diagnosis and how he turned it into a positive. I was only 12 when I found out I was diabetic. I'd been on Real Madrid's books for two years and obviously it was a tough time. I remember going to the hospital I was supposed to go to a tournament with Real Madrid but had to miss it and I was seen by a doctor, not an endocrinologist. She told me my footballing days were over. I had a really rough time that weekend. Three days later I saw Dr Ramrez, who would become my regular endocrinologist and whom I've grown very fond of. He told me the complete opposite: in no way was football over for me. In fact, it was essential I continued playing because physical exercise is very important. That Monday, my life started again. Of course it's difficult, because you have to take care of yourself three times more than a normal person, but in a roundabout way I think that also helps. You have to take greater care with your diet and the way you rest. It makes you more responsible because you always have to carry your equipment [insulin, monitor, etc]. UEFA social responsibility: health advice I have no limitations. I'm lucky enough to play football at the top level and I like playing all types of sport because it's very important to do physical exercise. I do a bit of everything. When we're on holiday, I like to cycle around the mountains. I do duathlons, triathlons ... diabetes doesn't prevent me from doing anything. There are food types I need to be a bit more careful about Continue reading >>

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

Improvements in the management of diabetes mellitus in the twentieth century have made it possible for athletes to compete in sport at a professional level. While it is rare for professional athletes to have type 2 diabetes, a number of notable athletes have type 1. Literature on the management of diabetes in competitive sports focuses on the difficulties with balancing energy and insulin intake during periods of strenuous exercise.[1] The following is a list of notable sportspeople who have had diabetes during their careers. It does not include athletes diagnosed after retirement. Water-Polo Keegan Coleman, Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens (2017-current) driver/attacker, type 1 American football[edit] Jay Cutler, Denver Broncos (2006–2008) and Chicago Bears (2009–2016) quarterback, type 1.[2] Mike Echols, Tennessee Titans (2002–2004) cornerback, type 1.[3] Kendall Simmons, Pittsburgh Steelers (2002–2008) guard, type 1.[4] Jake Byrne, San Diego Chargers, tight end, type 1[5] John Chick, Saskatchewan Roughriders (2007–2009, 2013–), Indianapolis Colts (2010–11), Jacksonville Jaguars (2011–2012) defensive end, type 1[6] Patrick Peterson, Arizona Cardinals (2011–); cornerback, type 2 Mark Andrews, Oklahoma Sooners, tight end, type 1[7] Australian rules football[edit] Nathan Bassett, Adelaide, type 1.[8] Jamie Cripps, St Kilda and West Coast, type 1.[9] Jack Fitzpatrick, Melbourne, Hawthorn type 1.[10] Brandon Jack, Sydney, type 1.[11] Paddy McCartin, St Kilda, type 1.[12] Sam Reid, Western Bulldogs and Greater Western Sydney, type 1.[8] Dale Weightman, Richmond, type 1.[8] Baseball[edit] Ron Santo, Chicago Cubs (1960–1973) and Chicago White Sox (1974) infielder, type 1, deceased (2010 at age 70). Sam Fuld, Chicago Cubs (2007–2010), Tampa Bay Rays (2011–2013), Continue reading >>

Football And Diabetes

Football And Diabetes

Your position on the pitch is a factor to consider when playing football Football is a competitive activity that, depending on how vigorously you play, can result in moderate to long intensity throughout a session. The more physically you play football, the greater the need to monitor your diabetes is. Playing once every so often will not require drastic management, but regular players will need a plan in place to keep their blood sugar levels stable. Positions on the pitch are a factor to acknowledge for footballers with diabetes. Playing in goal will not see you be as active as a midfielder, for example, who is required to work much harder and cover more ground. Gary Mabbutt , formerly of Tottenham Hotspur, has type 1 diabetes and became the most famous footballer in the United Kingdom who has the condition. Mabbutt retired in 1998 as a UEFA Cup and FA Cup winner. Danny McGrain and Andy Penman are other retired footballers who have diabetes, while Scott Allan, a Scottish midfielder with type 1 diabetes, currently plays for Hibernian. Managing your diabetes will initially be dependent on what time of the day you are scheduled to play football. Short sprints can stimulate glucagon release which raises blood glucose levels. Therefore, if your activity in the game consists mainly of short sprints with a low level of activity in between, it is possible to finish a half of football with higher blood glucose levels than at the start of the half. This effect can vary from person to person. Some positions, such as midfielders, are more likely to be moving throughout the game and are more likely to experience a steady reduction in blood sugar levels through the game. The risk of hypoglycemia during or following football can be minimised by reducing your prior basal dose. This Continue reading >>

Real Madrid's Nacho Told To Forget Career Due To Diabetes | Daily Mail Online

Real Madrid's Nacho Told To Forget Career Due To Diabetes | Daily Mail Online

Real Madrid defender Nacho has revealed that he was once urged to give up football as a youngster after being diagnosed with diabetes. The 27-year-old is currently enjoying his most prolific season with Madrid in terms of first-team appearances and is expected to be included in Spain's squad for the upcoming World Cup qualifier against Israel later this month. Nacho has now played over 100 games for his boyhood club since breaking into the first-team but the defender admits he once feared for his future at the Bernabeu after learning he had diabetes as an academy player. Real Madrid defender Nacho was once told to give up his dreams of becoming a footballer 'I was only 12 when I found out I was diabetic,' Nacho told UEFA. 'I'd been on Real Madrid's books for two years and obviously it was a tough time. 'I remember going to the hospital I was supposed to go to a tournament with Real Madrid but had to miss it and I was seen by a doctor, not an endocrinologist. She told me my footballing days were over. 'I had a really rough time that weekend. Three days later I saw Dr Ramirez, who would become my regular endocrinologist and whom I've grown very fond of. Nacho (right) was diagnosed with diabetes as a youngster and was told to quit football 'He told me the complete opposite: in no way was football over for me. In fact, it was essential I continued playing because physical exercise is very important. Already a two-time Champions League winner and La Liga champion, Nacho will be hoping to win yet more silverware with Madrid this season. Real Madrid lost top spot in La Liga on Wednesday after failing to beatLas Palmas at home Zinedine Zidane's side were leapfrogged by Barcelona at the top of La Liga on Wednesday night after failing to beatLas Palmas at the Bernabeu. Madrid tr Continue reading >>

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

A few weeks ago, Kyle Love was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This week he lost his job over the diagnosis. That’s the black and white truth. You could explain away the situation because Kyle Love happened to have been a defensive tackle for the New England Patriots. After the diagnosis he dropped 30 pounds off his 310 pound frame, thereby causing the team to cut him with a “non-football illness designation.” In plain English, Kyle Love was fired because he has diabetes. But he’s not alone, there are dozens of athletes with diabetes, many of them legendary. This week I am off on another journey with Team Diabetes. Over the past 5 years, I have raised more than $25 000 to help people living with diabetes, and pre-diabetes. The money I raise goes to research, support programs, and awareness. Awareness is the central point of what Team Diabetes is about. As we do our fundraising, we are telling everyone about diabetes, the importance of being active, and having a healthy diet. It’s too bad I couldn’t sit down with the New England Patriots and explain to them that athletes with diabetes is not a ‘firing offence.’ Bill Belichick, and the rest of the Patriots front office, the message you are sending to kids with diabetes is terrible. Instead of keeping an athlete who could act as a role model to tens of thousands of kids, you are cutting him loose – deeming him broken and worthless. Athletes with diabetes are not broken. It’s treatable, and manageable. In fact, Kyle Love has been managing his Type 2 diagnosis and is ready to ball this fall. Shame on you, Pats. Just check out this list of athletes with diabetes who went on to huge success. **UPDATE** The moment Love was put on waivers, the Jacksonsville Jaguars picked him up. Looks like I’ve got a new f Continue reading >>

Top 20 Diabetic Sportspeople

Top 20 Diabetic Sportspeople

The interplay between insulin therapy, diet, and exercise is extremely important to sportspeople with diabetes. The goal is to match the type, amount, and timing of insulin to food intake and activity level. Regular monitoring of blood glucose levels is critical to ensuring that appropriate amounts of insulin are provided and metabolic complications are avoided. Blood sugar levels have a direct impact on strength, speed, stamina, flexibility and healing capabilities all essential components of success in sport and fitness activities. Different forms of exercise can have very different effects on blood sugar, particularly when adrenal hormones start to kick in. Around-the-clock control is necessary for maintaining appropriate hydration and energy stores for athletic performance. Living with diabetes is an elite group of professional sportspeople, unstopped by their medical condition. They areexcelling against top competitors while managing a disease that demands constant attention and intensive management. Circumstances change often in the world of sports, where winning is the end goal, not glucose control. But fortunately for athletes with diabetes, technological advancements of the past few decades are allowing them to level the playing field to a point where they can focus more on succeeding in their sport while simultaneously triumphing over their disease. The following is a list of notable ,inspiring sportspeople who have Diabetes! James Buster Douglas (born April 7, 1960) is an American former professional boxer. He is best known for his stunning upset of Mike Tyson on February 11, 1990 in Tokyo to win the undisputed world heavyweight title. The son of professional boxer William Dynamite Douglas, Douglas grew up in Columbus, Ohio, in the predominantly black Linden Continue reading >>

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