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Which Foods Contain The Most Glucose?

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Foods Containing High Levels Of Glucose

Teo Quay is a health communication enthusiast based in Ottawa, Canada. She has been studying, teaching and working in the fields of exercise physiology and nutrition since 2007. Teo received a master's degree in human nutrition from the University of British Columbia. Fresh cherries for sale at a market.Photo Credit: Robert Stone/iStock/Getty Images Glucose is a sugar made of a single sugar unit that is ubiquitous in the food supply and a key player in human and plant metabolism. In human metabolism, glucose is responsible for providing energy. Although it's necessary to support human life, too much glucose in the diet has been associated with health complications such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Following dietary guidelines to ensure that sugar intakes are within a healthy range is a good way to avoid these problems. Individuals with diabetes need to be particularly careful about how much glucose and other sugars they consume. Glucose is a byproduct of the process of photosynthesis that plants undergo to provide themselves with energy. As a result, many plants, particularly fruits, are high in glucose. Examples of fruits high in glucose include banana Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. 4peace

    How much do fast-acting carbs raise BG?

    Hi Everyone,
    Just wondering . . .
    How much do fast-acting carbs raise BG?
    For example, when my son's BG = 52, and we want to raise it quickly, why is it better to use pure fruit juice or the glucose tabs? I know those are absorbed quicker, but in the end, doesn't ANY 15 carbs raise BG to the same level as the juice/glucose tabs eventually? And, how much does 4g, or 6g, or 8g, of the fast-acting carbs raise the BG?
    What I think I really want to know is what one carb equals in raising BG.
    Thanks!
    Sorry this question is hard to ask. I'm just not really sure how to word it.

  2. cjo20

    The rule of thumb I was told is that 10g carbs will raise your BG by 36 - 54 (the exact amount depends on the individual, and will probably vary for an individual depending on exactly what their body is doing).
    And yes, in theory, 10g of carbs will raise your BG by the same amount whether it is fast acting or slow acting, but if you are hypo, you want fast acting ones because they will stop your BG dropping low enough for you to pass out (you don't want to have to wait for 30 mins for your BG to rise).
    It isn't quite as simple as this though; with fast acting carbs, the sugar is in your blood very quickly, so your blood sugar spikes, then it comes down slowly as your body uses up the sugar. With slower acting carbs, the body uses up the sugar as it is being released in to the blood stream, which means that you dont peak at such a high number.

  3. nikki08

    For me, 1 gram of carb will raise me about 5 pts if I haven't recently exercised or have any IOB. So, two glucose tablets = about 40 pts, which is about what I want to do to treat a reaction, but I'm an adult reaching for really tight control, so I don't want to correct to much over 100. When I was younger, I corrected higher.
    Ultimately, it really depends on your total daily dose and your insulin to carb ratio. Definitely get a copy of Walsh's Pumping Insulin. Even if your child isn't pumping, there are numerous charts that will give you a starting place to experiment with things like this. You can test it, too, with one glucose tab under the right conditions.
    Also, fastest carbs are glucose tabs or gatorade. I treated lows for over 20 years with juice, soda, and dried fruit, and have never passed out (so it must work quickly enough), but I notice a dramatic difference when I use tabs or gatorade. I recover more quickly, and don't feel the nasty "reaction hangover." Slow carbs, theoretically, should raise us the same amount of points, but much slower, and that's not what you need during a low.
    Hope that helps.

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