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Which Dry Fruits Are Good For Diabetic Patients?

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Nuts Will Change Your Life

Last year everyone was talking about how good nuts are for diabetes. This year they’re just as good, and new research shows it. If you aren’t eating lots of nuts yet, I’m going to try to get you started. Nuts are great because they are seeds and fruit combined. They are literally full of life. According to Wikipedia, while fruit seeds are separate from the fruit itself, in nuts (according to the botanical definition of the term), the seeds and fruit (which the seed will use to grow if planted) are bound up together, making them among the most nutritious foods on the planet. New research from Louisiana State University found that people who regularly eat tree nuts — including almonds, macadamias, pistachios, walnuts, and cashews — have lower risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Their C-reactive protein (a major marker of inflammation) levels were lower. Their HDL (“good cholesterol”) levels were higher. According to The Huffington Post, the study was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation. Study results often show what the funders wanted them to show, but I tend to believe this one. It appeared in the Journal of t Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sirtuin

    I'm curious, from an anti-aging / disease-preventative stance, what's an ideal target range for post-prandial glucose (45m-1hr post-meal spike in blood sugar) and post-prandial elevated triglycerides?
    Edited by sirtuin, 10 December 2015 - 12:20 AM.

  2. Dean Pomerleau

    Sirtuin,
    Our former Chief Science Officer (Paul McGlothin), thinks the lower the better, often aiming to keep is post-meal glucose peak below 100 mg/dL, or even below 90 mg/dL. But I don't think Paul has any evidence that this tight control is necessary, or even beneficial.
    Normal (non-diabetic) peak glucose levels post-meal are often around 140mg/dL. I try to keep mine below 125 mg/dL, despite eating all my calories for the day in one big meal.
    I do not endorse the Perfect Health Diet, but this blog post from that website has a pretty good analysis of post-meal glucose and its relation to mortality. Looking at a bunch of studies, it concludes that adverse effects of glucose appear to kick in only as a result of excursions above 120mg/dL, and perhaps not until those above 140mg/dL. It also points to evidence for a U-shaped mortality curve for HbA1c - with the optimal being between 5.0 and 5.4%.
    --Dean

  3. sirtuin

    Dean Pomerleau, on 10 Dec 2015 - 5:44 PM, said:
    Our former Chief Science Officer (Paul McGlothin), thinks the lower the better, often aiming to keep is post-meal glucose peak below 100 mg/dL, or even below 90 mg/dL. But I don't think Paul has any evidence that this tight control is necessary, or even beneficial.
    Normal (non-diabetic) peak glucose levels post-meal are often around 140mg/dL. I try to keep mine below 125 mg/dL, despite eating all my calories for the day in one big meal.
    Hmm, looking into this more closely I might measure mine more frequently and investigate the response to different foods / meals. This was an interesting recent paper on the variances between individual responses:
    http://news.meta.com...nt-individuals/
    So, tonight for dinner I had lima beans (boiled), green beans (boiled), tomatoes (boiled), celery (boiled), leeks (boiled), cauliflower (lightly baked at 275F) with 1.5Tbs olive oil, a small handful of cherries, a few grams of flax, a small frozen green (not sweet) banana generously dusted with ceylon cinnamon, a tiny handful of blueberries, a raw carrot, and some fermented nuts. I also had a little bit of chicken. On the side, I had a tall glass of matcha green tea. By my rough calculations, this adds up to around 64.3 net carbohydrates and ~40g of fat. 1hr post-prandial glucose reads 129 mg/dL. Checking it a couple hours later, it reads 74 mg/dL. While eating higher amounts of starch, I've seen spikes up over 160 mg/dL.
    For lunch today, I had some whey protein, dark chocolate, a banana, 2 kiwis, a raw carrot, almond milk, coconut water, krill oil, a large avocado, and some macadamia nuts. This meal was around 48% fat by calories with 75g net carbs. 45m post-prandial glucose read 68 mg/dL, and 90m post-prandial glucose read 78 mg/dL.
    What's the trick for staying under 125 mg/dL, if not under 100 mg/dL or < 90mg /dL -- does this imply a high fat low carb diet? I've read you often exercise after eating, where it's not quite practical for me to excuse myself from the dinner table to quickly start exercising (it's already somewhat socially odd enough to be eating a calorie restricted diet and avoiding all processed foods.)
    Edited by sirtuin, 10 December 2015 - 11:45 PM.

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