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Which Diabetic Drugs Cause Weight Loss?

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Saxenda: New Weight Loss Drug In Battle Against Obesity

Saxenda: New Weight Loss Drug In Battle Against Obesity

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has approved the use of the drug liraglutide to assist with weight loss. The drug is sold under the brand name Saxenda for weight loss – it's also sold in a lower dose as Victoza for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. But how effective is it, and is it worth the high cost and potential side effects? We lab test and review 12 sets of scales, including models from Weight Watchers, Tanita and Fitbit, in our body fat scales reviews. How Saxenda works Saxenda is based on a human hormone that suppresses appetite, and is self-injected daily. It can be prescribed to people with a BMI of 30 or more, or people with a BMI 27–29 with weight-related conditions such as prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or sleep apnoea. It's not subsidised by the PBS, and costs around $400 per month by private prescription. How effective is it? In a large 56-week study sponsored by the manufacturer, 63.2% of people taking the drug – in conjunction with a reduced energy diet and increased exercise – lost at least 5% of their body weight, and 33.1% lost more than 10%. The patients had an average starting weight of around 106kg, and lost an average of 8.4kg over the time. There were other health improvements, including blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. A group of patients who received only lifestyle modification advice lost 2.8kg on average. The main side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and constipation. Less common, but more serious, side effects include hypoglycaemia (especially for people taking diabetes medication), pancreatitis, gallbladder disease, renal impairment and suicidal thoughts. Talk to your doctor about whether it's suitable for you. However, at over $5000 per year for an averag Continue reading >>

Start Contrave Today And Help Take Control Of Your Cravings To Lose Weight.

Start Contrave Today And Help Take Control Of Your Cravings To Lose Weight.

One of the ingredients in CONTRAVE, bupropion, may increase the risk of suicidal thinking in children, adolescents, and young adults. CONTRAVE patients should be monitored for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In patients taking bupropion for smoking cessation, serious neuropsychiatric adverse events have been reported. CONTRAVE is not approved for use in children under the age of 18. Stop taking CONTRAVE and call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; depression; anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); irritability; aggression, anger, or violence; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Do not take CONTRAVE if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure; have or have had seizures; use other medicines that contain bupropion such as WELLBUTRIN, APLENZIN or ZYBAN; have or have had an eating disorder; are dependent on opioid pain medicines or use medicines to help stop taking opioids such as methadone or buprenorphine, or are in opiate withdrawal; drink a lot of alcohol and abruptly stop drinking; are allergic to any of the ingredients in CONTRAVE; or are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Before taking CONTRAVE, tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Do not take any other medicines while you are taking CONTRAVE unless your healthcare provider says it is okay. Tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions including if you have: depression or other mental illnesses; a Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Two New Weight-loss Drugs

Fda Approves Two New Weight-loss Drugs

After roughly 13 years without a new weight-loss drug hitting the market, the US Food and Drug Administration has recently approved two new medicines for weight management. Belviq (lorcaserin hydrochloride) was approved on June 27, 2012 for use, in conjunction with a healthful diet and physical activity, in adults with a body-mass index of 30 or more (considered to be obese) or those with a body-mass index of 27 or more (considered to be overweight) with at least one weight-related condition such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure. Belviq works by activating a receptor in the brain that increases levels of serotonin, which may help a person to eat less and to feel full after smaller amounts of food. The drug is taken in a dose of 10 milligrams twice a day. (Doses of this medicine should not exceed 10 milligrams twice a day.) In trials with Belviq, roughly 38% of people with Type 2 taking the drug lost 5% of their body weight, compared to 16% of people with Type 2 being treated with a placebo (inactive treatment). In those without diabetes, approximately 47% of people taking the drug lost 5% of their body weight, compared to 23% of those taking placebo. The labeling for this medicine recommends that those who do not lose 5% of their body weight after 12 weeks of using the drug discontinue use, as they are unlikely to lose significant amounts of weight with continued treatment. This medicine should not be taken by pregnant women or by people who are taking drugs linked to valvular heart disease, such as Dostinex. Caution should be used in those who are taking certain medicines for depression, migraine, colds, or mood, anxiety, psychotic, or thought disorders; men with conditions that predispose them to erections lasting more than four hours; and men who have a defo Continue reading >>

Invokana And Farxiga For Weight Loss Management

Invokana And Farxiga For Weight Loss Management

Indications: Fluoxetine is indicated for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and Panic Disorder (with or without agoraphobia) in adults. Fluoxetine is also indicated for the treatment of MDD in children and adolescents 8 to 18 years of age and OCD in children and adolescents 7 to 17 years of age. Use another fluoxetine product for initial doses of 10 mg to 20 mg/day or for doses other than 30 mg or 60 mg. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR FLUOXETINE TABLETS, 60 mg WARNING: SUICIDAL THOUGHTS AND BEHAVIORS Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in children, adolescents, and young adults in short-term studies. These studies did not show an increase in the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior with antidepressant use in patients over age 24; there was a reduction in risk with antidepressant use in patients aged 65 and older. In patients of all ages who are started on antidepressant therapy, monitor closely for worsening and for emergence of suicidal thoughts and behavior. Advise families and caregivers of the need for close observation and communication with the prescriber. Fluoxetine is not approved for use in children less than 7 years of age. Do not use monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) intended to treat psychiatric disorders with fluoxetine or within 5 weeks of stopping treatment with fluoxetine due to risk of serotonin syndrome. Do not use fluoxetine within 14 days of stopping an MAOI intended to treat psychiatric disorders. In addition, do not start fluoxetine in a patient who is being treated with linezolid or intravenous methylene blue due to risk of serotonin syndrome. Do not use fluoxetine with pimozide due to risk of QT interval prolongation and drug interact Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Helps The Obese Shed Some Weight

Diabetes Drug Helps The Obese Shed Some Weight

The type 2 diabetes drug canagliflozin (Invokana) was associated with modest weight loss in an early trial of heavy patients who didn't have hyperglycemia, researchers found. In a phase IIb trial, obese and overweight patients who didn't have diabetes lost a significantly larger proportion of body weight on any of three doses of the drug compared with placebo (P<0.05), Harold Bays, MD, of Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center in Kentucky, and colleagues reported online in Obesity. This amounted to a "relatively modest" loss of about 2% to 3% of body weight, compared with only about 1% loss with placebo, they wrote. Canagliflozin is the first sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor approved to treat type 2 diabetes in the U.S., and it works by dumping excess blood sugar into the urine. Researchers have hypothesized that this increased urinary glucose excretion leads to a decline in calories, and hence a reduction in body weight, possibly even in patients who don't have type 2 diabetes. Several other diabetes drugs have also been investigated for weight loss potential, including liraglutide (Victoza) and exenatide (Byetta). Novo Nordisk, maker of liraglutide, recently announced it would seek FDA approval for liraglutide in weight loss in nondiabetics within the year. To test canagliflozin's impact on weight loss, Bays and colleagues conducted a 12-week phase IIb trial in 376 patients who were overweight or obese but didn't have type 2 diabetes. Patients were randomized to placebo or to one of three doses (50, 100, or 300 mg) of canagliflozin. Their mean body mass index (BMI) at baseline was 37 kg/m and 93% fell into the obese category. The authors found that the drug did indeed do its job, significantly increasing urinary glucose excretion in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications And Weight Gain

Diabetes Medications And Weight Gain

Both people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes usually gain weight when they begin therapy, either insulin or some type 2 diabetes medications. For many people with type 1, weight gain is advisable due to the loss of lean body mass often accompanying the disease prior to diagnosis and treatment. However, for people with type 2, and increasingly people with type 1 who were overweight or obese before their diagnosis, seeing the numbers on the scale rise is counterproductive. Increasing weight leads to more insulin resistance, which in addition to making diabetes harder to control, escalates cardiovascular risk. There are a variety of reasons weight gain occurs when people start insulin. Some people with type 2 were in poor glycemic control prior to beginning insulin. These folks were seeing the energy from the food they ate end up in their urine stream instead of being stored as fat. As their control improves with insulin, the lost energy finds its way into the fat cells. Treatment for hypoglycemia, if it happens frequently, can also be a source of added pounds when insulin is initiated. Additionally, since an exact replacement for physiological insulin secretion is almost impossible to duplicate, patients may often be taking slightly more insulin than needed over a 24-hour period. Normal circadian rhythm for insulin secretion surges from 4 am to about 7 am then drops, increases a bit around dinner time through 10 pm and declines to its lowest level until the early morning hours. Injected insulin is unable to mirror this profile. Finally, injected insulin follows a slightly different pathway to the cells from insulin that comes from our bodies. Insulin from our bodies is directed first to the liver but insulin that is injected travels first through the blood circulation wher Continue reading >>

The Weight Loss Pill Of The Future (no, We Swear) Helps Diabetics And Obese

The Weight Loss Pill Of The Future (no, We Swear) Helps Diabetics And Obese

A new pill developed by the Salk Institute may be an answer to the giant, out-of-shape question mark that is the American obesity epidemic. Researchers are calling it the “Invisible Meal” because of how it interacts with the body’s digestive system, and if it works as well in humans as it already has in mice, the future of weight loss could see serious turnarounds. Recently published in an issue of Nature Medicine, the findings hinge on a receptor nestled in much of the body’s gut, called the farensoid X receptor, or FXR. It turns on when we begin to eat food, helping bile to digest the contents for nutrient absorption. But where previous weight loss pills have failed, due to harmful scattershot FXR targeting or other means, such as outright appetite suppression, researchers believe the new pill’s mechanism avoids these risks. "This pill is like an imaginary meal," said Ronald Evans, director of Salk's Gene Expression Laboratory and senior author of the new paper, in a statement. "It sends out the same signals that normally happen when you eat a lot of food, so the body starts clearing out space to store it. But there are no calories and no change in appetite." The pill isn’t for people with just a little extra around the waist, however. It’s intended for the some 29.1 million people who suffer from diabetes, many of whom make up the 78.6 million people, or one-third of the population, who is currently obese. If scientists can perfect the pill’s effectiveness while minimizing side effects, they hope it can someday replace gastric bypass surgery as a desired means of major weight loss. If mouse models are anything to go by, the future is promising. Over a five-week period, lab mice who took a daily pill of fexaramine, a compound the team developed from th Continue reading >>

Need Help Taking Off Excess Weight And Keeping It Off?

Need Help Taking Off Excess Weight And Keeping It Off?

Saxenda® (liraglutide) injection 3 mg is an injectable prescription medicine that may help some adults with excess weight (BMI ≥27) who also have weight-related medical problems or obesity (BMI ≥30) lose weight and keep the weight off. Saxenda® should be used with a reduced-calorie meal plan and increased physical activity Saxenda® is not for the treatment of type 2 diabetes Saxenda® and Victoza® have the same active ingredient, liraglutide, and should not be used together Saxenda® should not be used with other GLP-1 receptor agonist medicines Saxenda® and insulin should not be used together It is not known if Saxenda® is safe and effective when taken with other prescription, over-the-counter, or herbal weight-loss products It is not known if Saxenda® changes your risk of heart problems or stroke or of death due to heart problems or stroke It is not known if Saxenda® can be used safely in people who have had pancreatitis It is not known if Saxenda® is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age. Saxenda® is not recommended for use in children Serious side effects may happen in people who take Saxenda®, including: Possible thyroid tumors, including cancer. Tell your health care professional if you get a lump or swelling in your neck, hoarseness, trouble swallowing, or shortness of breath. These may be symptoms of thyroid cancer. In studies with rats and mice, Saxenda® and medicines that work like Saxenda® caused thyroid tumors, including thyroid cancer. It is not known if Saxenda® will cause thyroid tumors or a type of thyroid cancer called medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) in people. Do not use Saxenda® if you or any of your family have ever had MTC, or if you have an endocrine system condition called Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome t Continue reading >>

A Lot Of Choice In Diabetes Medications

A Lot Of Choice In Diabetes Medications

The number and variety of diabetes medications can be bewildering, but, on the plus side, that means choice. Some people may prefer easy-to-take drugs; others want one that won't cause weight gain; still others may desire something that allows them to adjust dosing on a daily basis. "It's the perfect example of personalized medicine," Kendall says. In addition to the immediate effects of diabetes meds (glucose control and side effects such as nausea and diarrhea), patients and doctors must consider the long-term effects of drugs taken every day for years. A possible plus for metformin: A recent review of 11 studies reported that people taking it have a 31% lower risk of developing or dying of cancer compared with other diabetes treatments. Medications for diabetes generally fall into just three categories based on what they do. They either affect food absorption, increase availability of insulin or increase the body's responsiveness to insulin. Here's the breakdown. Metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage), an insulin-sensitizing drug, is taken by mouth twice a day. Users should test their blood sugar two to five times per week. This is the first-line drug. Pluses and minuses: Metformin has minimal effects on body weight, rarely causes low blood sugar problems and is available in generic form. Long-term studies suggest the drug may reduce the risk of some cancers. It can't be used in people with kidney or liver disease, and some people experience gastrointestinal side effects, such as nausea or diarrhea. The sulfonylureas, such as glipizide (Glucotrol), glimepiride (Amaryl) and glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase), increase insulin production, are once- or twice-daily pills and don't require daily sugar testing. Pluses and minuses: Sulfonylureas are quick-working, effective sugar-lower Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications That Promote Weight Loss

Diabetes Medications That Promote Weight Loss

Most patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are above their ideal weight. Excess weight, particularly around the waist, is a major cause of insulin resistance, a condition in which the body does not use insulin effectively causing glucose to build up in the blood instead of being absorbed by the cells. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes. Losing weight greatly reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and can help bring blood glucose under control in individuals who already have the disease. Individuals with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese are at increased risk of developing complications. Losing just a few pounds through exercise, eating well and taking the right medications can help control diabetes and reduce the risk for other health problems. Some diabetes medications not only lower blood glucose but also have the added benefit of promoting weight loss. One of the common findings in early type 2 diabetes is hyperinsulinemia, a condition in which the pancreas secretes large amounts of insulin to counter insulin resistance to keep blood glucose within normal range. Insulin has been shown to act on the brain and produce hunger or stimulate appetite. Metformin prevents the pancreas from secreting too much insulin by increasing the body’s sensitivity to insulin and suppressing the release of glucose from the liver, thereby preventing blood glucose levels from rising too high and lowering appetite. Liraglutide is a once-daily injectable medication for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus that provides substantial reduction in HbA1c, a key measure of blood glucose control. It also has the added benefit of promoting weight loss by reducing appetite. Marketed under the brand name Victoza, it mimics the action of an intestinal hormon Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Drug Could Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - And Reverse High Blood Sugar

Weight Loss Drug Could Prevent Type 2 Diabetes - And Reverse High Blood Sugar

The drug - liraglutide - which increases the amount of appetite-suppressing hormones produced by the gut, was tested on overweight people with prediabetes. This is also known as ‘borderline diabetes,’ and is characterised by slightly increased blood sugar levels. The condition often leads to type 2 diabetes when untreated. Prediabetes affects one in ten people in the UK, and progresses into diabetes in five to ten per cent of patients within ten years. Prediabetes is curable with exercise and a healthier diet, but once it progresses into diabetes, it is significantly harder to treat. Both conditions are linked to poor health - causing condition such as nerve damage, blindness and even amputation. Professor Carel le Roux from Imperial College London and her team have found that a drug already used for obesity and diabetes can help to prevent progression into diabetes when combined with diet and exercise, and could even cure patients of prediabetes altogether. The researchers recruited 2,254 obese adults with prediabetes at 191 research sites in 27 countries worldwide. After splitting participants into two groups, they studied whether adding daily self-administered injections of liraglutide to diet and exercise helped to prevent progression into diabetes, compared to diet and exercise alone. After three years, the researchers found that the patients given liraglutide were 80 per cent less likely to develop diabetes than those in the placebo group. In 60 per cent of those patients, prediabetes was reversed and patients returned to healthy blood sugar levels Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Liraglutid Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Jardiance And Weight Loss

What You Should Know About Jardiance And Weight Loss

Jardiance is an oral diabetes drug that is used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D is a common condition that happens when the body cannot produce enough insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone which helps glucose get into the cells of the body to be used for energy. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the body’s cells, which leads to a build up in the bloodstream. If left untreated, too much glucose in the blood can lead to serious health complications, such as blindness, kidney and nerve damage. People with T2D can take this medicine to help them lower high blood sugar levels. When you take this medication, it works by inhibiting glucose reabsorption by the kidneys, which increases excretion of glucose via urine. This will in turn lower high blood sugar levels in people with T2D. What is Jardiance? It is a brand name of empagliflozin. It is an oral diabetes drug used to control blood sugar levels. This medication works by helping your kidneys excrete glucose from the blood. Jardiance is part of a treatment program that also includes an exercise program and diet plan. This medication should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes. How to take this medication The initial dosage of this medication is 10 mg per day, while the maximum dose is 25 mg per day. You should take Jardiance by mouth, once in the morning, every day. This medication can be taken with food or without. You should not increase or decrease your dosage without your doctor’s permission. However, your doctor may need to change your dosage so that you can get the best results out of this medication. Jardiance and weight loss While Jardiance is prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes in order to help control blood glucose levels, a side effect of taki Continue reading >>

This Drug Slows Down The Food In Your Stomach To Help You Lose Weight

This Drug Slows Down The Food In Your Stomach To Help You Lose Weight

A drug that keeps your blood sugar in check can help you trim your waistline, too. A diabetes medication called liraglutide can help accelerate weight loss, according to a new study published in The Lancet. In the study, researchers recruited 40 obese adults—those with a body mass index (BMI) above 30—and split them up into two groups. The first received standard behavioral and nutritional counseling to help them lose weight. The second group was given injections of the diabetes drug liraglutide, which reduces blood sugar levels, along with weight loss counseling. After 16 weeks, the liraglutide group lost significantly more weight than the control group—nearly 12 pounds, compared to five and a half pounds. We've known for a while that liraglutide can help accelerate weight loss. Back in 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved prescription injections under the brand name Saxenda for weight loss in people with a BMI of 30 or above, or 27 or above if the person had weight-related health risks like high blood pressure or diabetes, too. How Blood Pressure Causes a Stroke: This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. End of dialog window. But this research added some context for how exactly the drug works: After five weeks, the liraglutide group showed a 70-minute delay in gastric emptying—i.e., how quickly food leaves your stomach—compared to just four minutes for the control group. After 16 weeks, gastric emptying continued to be delayed in the liraglutide group, at about 31 minutes. Prior research on liraglutide has linked its delay on gastric emptying to feeling fuller and eating less. That’s one of the same processes that explains why the drug is prescribed for people with diabetes, too: Beca Continue reading >>

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