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Which Diabetic Drugs Cause Weight Loss?

Have Diabetes? New Drugs Can Help You Pee Out Excess Sugar

Have Diabetes? New Drugs Can Help You Pee Out Excess Sugar

An abnormally high level of sugar in your urine has traditionally been a sign of uncontrolled diabetes and something to be corrected. But that notion has been turned on its head by a new class of diabetes drugs that work by increasing how much sugar patients pass in their urine. New path to blood sugar control To date, two of these new drugs have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating type 2 diabetes. The first, canagliflozin (Invokana®), was cleared last March; the second, dapagliflozin (Farxiga®), was approved just this week. Both drugs are so-called SGLT2 inhibitors that act by blocking the kidneys’ reabsorption of sugar, or glucose. The result is that more glucose is released in the urine and the patient’s blood glucose level goes down — a major goal of diabetes treatment. Most other available drugs for diabetes work by targeting the liver, pancreas or gut to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce insulin resistance or stimulate insulin secretion. In contrast, SGLT2 inhibitors work completely independent of insulin. The two new medications, which are taken by mouth in pill form, are approved for use as stand-alone drug therapy, in addition to changes in diet and increased exercise, or in combination with other drugs for diabetes. Their approvals were based on multiple clinical studies — nine for canagliflozin and 16 for dapagliflozin — showing that they effectively lowered hemoglobin A1c, a measure of average blood sugar level over the previous three months. A surprise effect on the waistline An added benefit is that SGLT2 inhibitors are associated with modest weight loss. For instance, patients shed from 2.8 percent to 5.7 percent of body weight in clinical studies of canagliflozin. “The weight loss is an appealing side effec Continue reading >>

Can The Diabetes Drug Trulicity Cause Weight Loss?

Can The Diabetes Drug Trulicity Cause Weight Loss?

Trulicity works by stimulating insulin production and inhibiting glucagon. It also slows down digestion and causes weight loss to the point it's also known as "Trulicity weight loss drug" among people who are interested in weight loss. The good thing is that you need to take it only once a week, it's injected. A lot of people initially experience a myriad of side effects on Trulicity. Nausea, diarrhea, stomach pain, bloating, indigestion, and a lack of appetite are all pretty common. Few people on Trulicity will say they didn't experience any of these. You shouldn't get urticaria, breathing difficulties, swelling, or bad pain on your upper abdomen though. If you do, you need a doctor. Just Say No 4 months ago Don't fall for it. Promoted as a wonder drug for diabetes, Trulicity actually comes with a whole host of unpleasant side effects, not to mention dangerous consequences in the long term. Cancer is probably the worst, and this is not unique to Trulicity but applies to GLP-1 drugs in general. As for the weight loss, yes, you may lose weight on Trulicity, but that is because it makes you sick as a pig the whole time you are on it, so you don't feel like eating. That is not a healthy way to achieve weight loss at all. There are better ways to go about weight loss. My rule of thumb is this: If in doubt, consult the manufacturer of the drug. They're not allowed to make wild and untrue claims about the results of their products, or they'd have the FDA on their backs. :) In this case, the manufacturer makes it very clear that Trulicity is not a weight loss drug. It is a diabetes drug that encourages your body to increase its own insulin production. That is what its primary purpose is. Studies, they say, show that most people using Trulicity will lose between two and six pou Continue reading >>

Do Diabetic Medication Cause Weight Loss?

Do Diabetic Medication Cause Weight Loss?

Top anti-diabetes drugs that have shown to have weight loss properties include: Byetta (exenatide) Victoza (Liraglutide) Invokana (canagliflozin) Farxiga (dapagliflozin) Bydureon Diabetes causes changes in your body’s structures and their function. It can also makes you prone to gain weight. To add fuel to the fire, diabetic drugs are closely linked to our body weight and may lead to unnecessary weight gain. Most of the older diabetes controlling drugs are known to cause weight gain by making you retain extra calories and increasing appetite. However, some of the newer agents may cause you to lose weight. Weight loss is very helpful in obtaining a good blood glucose control level. It also minimizes the risks of having heart problems or vessels’ disorders. There are many proposed mechanisms of these drugs working to shed extra body fats. According to most researchers, these drugs have the capability of reducing body weight by suppressing appetite. They delay the gastric emptying (release of food content from the stomach into the intestine) and it takes longer for food to reach small intestine from the stomach. A delayed entry of food into the intestine gives a fuller feeling and helps avoid overeating. Once we feel fuller, we stop eating. These drugs reduce caloric intake, which may help reduce weight as well. These drugs are particularly effective for individuals with type 2 diabetes. One of the main reasons why people develop type 2 diabetes is high body fat content. The extra fat in the body envelops the body cells; as a result they fail to respond to insulin. Losing weight means you are losing body fat too. As a result, your cells start responding well to the available insulin. Diabetic FAQ recommends talking to your doctor before taking any drugs to discuss your Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications May Double As Weight Loss Drugs

Diabetes Medications May Double As Weight Loss Drugs

may also aid weight loss in overweight people with or without diabetes, a new study shows. The drugs Byetta and Victoza mimic gut hormones that decrease appetite. They are typically prescribed when patients need medication to help control their blood sugar. A new research review, published in BMJ, reanalyzed data from 25 separate studies. The review reveals that the drugs helped overweight people without diabetes shed an average of 7 pounds and those with diabetes lose an average of 6 pounds when injected daily or weekly for at least five months. That makes these agents promising treatments for obesity, study authors say. “It’s not a cure, but it’s a good treatment. And you still need to combine it with lifestyle changes,” says researcher Tina Vilsboll, MD, DMSc, an endocrinologist and associate professor at Gentofte Hospital in Hellerup, Denmark. Vilsboll says the modest weight loss many of her diabetic patients see on the drugs helps encourage them to kick up their diet and exercise programs to lose even more weight. “They use it as a tool for changing their lifestyle,” she says. The medications also appear to lower blood pressure and cholesterol slightly, which may help heart disease risks. But the drugs, known as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, also come with side effects. They work, in part, by slowing the movement of food through the stomach. That can sometimes cause a good deal of nausea or even vomiting, especially after a large meal. But Vilsboll says that side effect generally fades over time and doesn’t usually cause people to stop taking the medication. Experts who were not involved in the review say they are cautiously optimistic about the drugs’ prospects for weight loss. “We do have an obesity epidemic. Weight loss by Continue reading >>

This Drug Slows Down The Food In Your Stomach To Help You Lose Weight

This Drug Slows Down The Food In Your Stomach To Help You Lose Weight

A drug that keeps your blood sugar in check can help you trim your waistline, too. A diabetes medication called liraglutide can help accelerate weight loss, according to a new study published in The Lancet. In the study, researchers recruited 40 obese adults—those with a body mass index (BMI) above 30—and split them up into two groups. The first received standard behavioral and nutritional counseling to help them lose weight. The second group was given injections of the diabetes drug liraglutide, which reduces blood sugar levels, along with weight loss counseling. After 16 weeks, the liraglutide group lost significantly more weight than the control group—nearly 12 pounds, compared to five and a half pounds. We've known for a while that liraglutide can help accelerate weight loss. Back in 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved prescription injections under the brand name Saxenda for weight loss in people with a BMI of 30 or above, or 27 or above if the person had weight-related health risks like high blood pressure or diabetes, too. How Blood Pressure Causes a Stroke: This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. End of dialog window. But this research added some context for how exactly the drug works: After five weeks, the liraglutide group showed a 70-minute delay in gastric emptying—i.e., how quickly food leaves your stomach—compared to just four minutes for the control group. After 16 weeks, gastric emptying continued to be delayed in the liraglutide group, at about 31 minutes. Prior research on liraglutide has linked its delay on gastric emptying to feeling fuller and eating less. That’s one of the same processes that explains why the drug is prescribed for people with diabetes, too: Beca Continue reading >>

Diabetic Drugs That Cause Weight Loss

Diabetic Drugs That Cause Weight Loss

These drugs are designed for people who have type 2 diabetes. Large studies testing the drugs for weight loss in people without diabetes are ongoing. A new research review, published in BMJreanalyzed data from 25 separate studies. Accessed March 21, diabetic drugs that cause weight loss, Health Tracker Track what you eat and your activities to see your progress and achieve your goals. Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised. Because the drugs are already on the market, doctors have the ability to prescribe them solely for weight loss. Also visit for diabetic drugs that cause weight loss: childrens weight loss programs best weight loss foods to eat best weight loss tracking app loss of weight at death hysterectomy weight gain or loss weight loss doctors in va weight loss calendar template pcos supplements weight loss www body wraps weight loss childrens weight loss programs Continue reading >>

The Weight Loss Pill Of The Future (no, We Swear) Helps Diabetics And Obese

The Weight Loss Pill Of The Future (no, We Swear) Helps Diabetics And Obese

A new pill developed by the Salk Institute may be an answer to the giant, out-of-shape question mark that is the American obesity epidemic. Researchers are calling it the “Invisible Meal” because of how it interacts with the body’s digestive system, and if it works as well in humans as it already has in mice, the future of weight loss could see serious turnarounds. Recently published in an issue of Nature Medicine, the findings hinge on a receptor nestled in much of the body’s gut, called the farensoid X receptor, or FXR. It turns on when we begin to eat food, helping bile to digest the contents for nutrient absorption. But where previous weight loss pills have failed, due to harmful scattershot FXR targeting or other means, such as outright appetite suppression, researchers believe the new pill’s mechanism avoids these risks. "This pill is like an imaginary meal," said Ronald Evans, director of Salk's Gene Expression Laboratory and senior author of the new paper, in a statement. "It sends out the same signals that normally happen when you eat a lot of food, so the body starts clearing out space to store it. But there are no calories and no change in appetite." The pill isn’t for people with just a little extra around the waist, however. It’s intended for the some 29.1 million people who suffer from diabetes, many of whom make up the 78.6 million people, or one-third of the population, who is currently obese. If scientists can perfect the pill’s effectiveness while minimizing side effects, they hope it can someday replace gastric bypass surgery as a desired means of major weight loss. If mouse models are anything to go by, the future is promising. Over a five-week period, lab mice who took a daily pill of fexaramine, a compound the team developed from th Continue reading >>

Anti-diabetes And Anti-obesity Medications: Effects On Weight In People With Diabetes

Anti-diabetes And Anti-obesity Medications: Effects On Weight In People With Diabetes

Choosing medications for people with diabetes involves consideration of a number of factors, including effects on weight. Improvements in glucose control are often linked to weight gain, but this does not have to be the inevitable result of diabetes treatment. Adding a drug that either promotes weight-loss or is weight neutral to one that promotes weight gain and providing medical nutrition therapy can be considered. The current approach to the treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is to achieve the best possible glucose control. Past clinical trials have shown that glycemia plays a key role in the prevention of both macro- and microvascular complications.1–5 The current American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines suggest a glycemic goal of having a hemoglobin A1c (A1C) < 7%, but also state that an A1C of ≤ 6% should be a goal if it can be achieved without risk of complications.6,7 During the past 20 years, a number of new medications to control blood glucose have been introduced, and new approaches to the use of older medications have been developed. In prescribing any medication, however, one must consider benefits versus risks. In terms of the treatment of hyperglycemia, certainly toxic side effects are of concern, as is hypoglycemia. One major area of concern, however, is the effect of such drugs on weight. Weight and diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, are closely related. Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, and the current increase in obesity in our society has fueled a major increase in the expression of this disease.8 Not only does weight, through the mechanism of insulin resistance, aggravate hyperglycemia, it also increases the risk for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and other conditions that lead to cardiovasc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Appears Effective For Weight Loss, Study Shows

Diabetes Drug Appears Effective For Weight Loss, Study Shows

Novo Nordisk's big-selling diabetes drug Victoza appears to be an effective weight loss therapy, data from a late-stage clinical trial presented on Saturday demonstrated. In the 56-week study of 846 overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes, a daily injection of 3 milligrams of Victoza led to significantly greater weight loss than did a placebo. Patients taking the 3 mg dose of the drug, known chemically as liraglutide, had a mean loss of 5.9 percent of body weight. That compared with a loss of 4.6 percent for a 1.8 mg dose and just 2 percent loss for those who got a placebo. All patients were also put on a diet and exercise program. The results were presented at the American Diabetes Association meeting in San Francisco. Weight loss had been viewed as a beneficial side effect of Victoza as obesity is a leading cause of type 2 diabetes. But with obesity becoming a global health crisis, Novo Nordisk now sees the medicine as a potentially lucrative weight loss drug at a higher than currently approved dose. Some two thirds of Americans are classified as overweight or obese. Victoza had global sales of about $542 million in the first quarter. Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk is awaiting approval decisions from U.S. and European regulators for 3 mg liraglutide for weight loss. It is approved to treat type 2 diabetes in the United States at 1.2 mg and 1.8 mg. In the study, called Scale, 50 percent of patients taking 3 mg Victoza lost at least 5 percent of body weight and 22 percent dropped more than 10 percent. On that measure, "it stacks up very favorably against other medications that are out there or likely to be approved," Dr. Robert Kushner, an obesity specialist and one of the trial's investigators, said in a telephone interview. The efficacy should easily satisfy U. Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

I recently was included in a discussion on a Facebook group for athletes with diabetes about how hard it can be to lose weight through exercise. While I would never claim to have all the answers on this topic, here are some ideas about what can make you gain weight or keep you from losing weight with diabetes, based on my decades of professional and personal experience with diabetes and weight management, and what you can do about it. Insulin My former graduate student with type 1 diabetes went on an insulin pump and promptly gained about 10 pounds, even though his blood glucose control improved only marginally. Why did this happen to him (and why does it happen to so many other insulin users)? As a naturally occurring anabolic hormone, insulin promotes the uptake and storage of glucose, amino acids, and fat into insulin-sensitive cells around your body (mainly muscle and fat cells). It doesn’t matter whether it’s released naturally, injected, or pumped—all insulin and insulin analogues have these same effects. Going on intensive insulin therapy is associated with fat weight gain (1), for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Some of the weight gain comes from that if you’re using insulin to keep your blood glucose in control, you’ll be keeping and storing all of the calories that you’re eating instead of losing some glucose through urine (during hyperglycemia). Unfortunately, this realization has led some people to try skipping or limiting their insulin use to help them lose weight (2), but that is a dangerous practice that can lead to loss of excess muscle mass and life-threatening conditions like DKA. The best way to balance your insulin use and your body weight, in my opinion, is to be physically active to keep your overall insulin levels lower. I Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications

Oral Diabetes Medications

A list of oral diabetes medications with advantages, disadvantages, and side effects. Click on the name of a drug for more information. Biguanides Glucophage (generic name: metformin) Glucophage XR (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Fortamet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Glumetza (generic name: metformin hydrochloride) extended release Riomet (generic name: metformin hydrochloride liquid) What are Biguanides? Metformin is the only member of the biguanides family in use today. Metformin (met-FOR-min) helps lower blood glucose by making sure your liver does not put extra glucose into the system when it is not needed. The ADA Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes recommend the inclusion of metformin (along with diet and exercise) in initial diabetes treatment. A good thing about metformin is that it does not cause blood glucose to get too low (hypoglycemia) when it is the only diabetes medicine you take. Who can take this medicine? Adults with type 2 diabetes can take metformin with their doctor’s approval and supervision. You should avoid metformin if you have liver or kidney problems, lung or heart disease, or conditions that cause low blood oxygen levels. Who should not take this medicine? People with certain types of heart problems, such as congestive heart failure, should use caution with this medicine. People with reduced kidney function or kidney disease should probably not take metformin. It should be used with caution if you regularly consume more than two to three drinks daily, so check with your doctor about that. Advantages Metformin, when used alone, is unlikely to cause low blood sugar. It is one of those medicines that always seems to help even after people have had diabetes for a while, and, for this reason Continue reading >>

Diabetic Drugs That Help With Weight Loss Supplements

Diabetic Drugs That Help With Weight Loss Supplements

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Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Saxenda: New Weight Loss Drug In Battle Against Obesity

Saxenda: New Weight Loss Drug In Battle Against Obesity

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has approved the use of the drug liraglutide to assist with weight loss. The drug is sold under the brand name Saxenda for weight loss – it's also sold in a lower dose as Victoza for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. But how effective is it, and is it worth the high cost and potential side effects? We lab test and review 12 sets of scales, including models from Weight Watchers, Tanita and Fitbit, in our body fat scales reviews. How Saxenda works Saxenda is based on a human hormone that suppresses appetite, and is self-injected daily. It can be prescribed to people with a BMI of 30 or more, or people with a BMI 27–29 with weight-related conditions such as prediabetes, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or sleep apnoea. It's not subsidised by the PBS, and costs around $400 per month by private prescription. How effective is it? In a large 56-week study sponsored by the manufacturer, 63.2% of people taking the drug – in conjunction with a reduced energy diet and increased exercise – lost at least 5% of their body weight, and 33.1% lost more than 10%. The patients had an average starting weight of around 106kg, and lost an average of 8.4kg over the time. There were other health improvements, including blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. A group of patients who received only lifestyle modification advice lost 2.8kg on average. The main side effects are nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and constipation. Less common, but more serious, side effects include hypoglycaemia (especially for people taking diabetes medication), pancreatitis, gallbladder disease, renal impairment and suicidal thoughts. Talk to your doctor about whether it's suitable for you. However, at over $5000 per year for an averag Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications And Weight Gain

Diabetes Medications And Weight Gain

Both people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes usually gain weight when they begin therapy, either insulin or some type 2 diabetes medications. For many people with type 1, weight gain is advisable due to the loss of lean body mass often accompanying the disease prior to diagnosis and treatment. However, for people with type 2, and increasingly people with type 1 who were overweight or obese before their diagnosis, seeing the numbers on the scale rise is counterproductive. Increasing weight leads to more insulin resistance, which in addition to making diabetes harder to control, escalates cardiovascular risk. There are a variety of reasons weight gain occurs when people start insulin. Some people with type 2 were in poor glycemic control prior to beginning insulin. These folks were seeing the energy from the food they ate end up in their urine stream instead of being stored as fat. As their control improves with insulin, the lost energy finds its way into the fat cells. Treatment for hypoglycemia, if it happens frequently, can also be a source of added pounds when insulin is initiated. Additionally, since an exact replacement for physiological insulin secretion is almost impossible to duplicate, patients may often be taking slightly more insulin than needed over a 24-hour period. Normal circadian rhythm for insulin secretion surges from 4 am to about 7 am then drops, increases a bit around dinner time through 10 pm and declines to its lowest level until the early morning hours. Injected insulin is unable to mirror this profile. Finally, injected insulin follows a slightly different pathway to the cells from insulin that comes from our bodies. Insulin from our bodies is directed first to the liver but insulin that is injected travels first through the blood circulation wher Continue reading >>

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