diabetestalk.net

Which Diabetes Needs Injections?

Diabetes Type 1

Diabetes Type 1

The young people we talked to tell us what it is like to inject insulin every day, the problems they've had and how they've coped with them. Where and how to inject Young people are taught by specialist diabetes nurses and doctors how and where to inject. Arms, legs and the stomach are all parts of the body recommended for injection. Most people said that their preferred place was the stomach. But they also said that it's important to vary the place where they inject, over a wide area. They said that injecting in the same place can cause lumps or other changes, called hyperlipotrophy, to develop under the skin. Your healthcare team can teach you how to recognise these changes. Injecting into the areas that have developed this problem is usually completely painless but the insulin may then be absorbed unevenly, which makes blood sugar much harder to control. Some young people who were small children when diagnosed said that they have grown up with doing daily injections and thought it was normal. Other children were scared of needles at first and their parents had to inject them, to begin with. Young people have different opinions as to whether insulin injections hurt or not. Some said that the needles they use are so thin that they don't feel it, but others said it depends on how relaxed and comfortable they are at the time of the injection. Several young people commented that it's much easier and painless to do the injections themselves because they know their own body. Most young people said that it is down to practice and that 'practice makes it perfect'. The people we talked to said that doing their own injections made them feel in control and gave them a feeling of independence. Getting used to injecting everyday It could take a long time to get used to injecting e Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

By Ernest Ward, DVM & Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Emergency Situations, Medical Conditions This handout provides detailed information on insulin administration. For more information about diabetes mellitus, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - General Information", and "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment". What is diabetes mellitus? In dogs, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar. This is Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (also called Type 1 Diabetes). This type of diabetes usually results from destruction of most or all of the beta-cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar levels. What do I need to know about insulin treatment for diabetes mellitus? In diabetic dogs, the main treatment for regulating blood glucose is giving insulin by injection. Dogs with diabetes mellitus typically require two daily insulin injections as well as a dietary change. Although the dog can go a day or so without insulin and not have a crisis, this should not be a regular occurrence; treatment should be looked upon as part of the dog's daily routine. This means that you, as the dog's owner, must make both a financial commitment and a personal commitment to treat your dog. If are out of town or go on vacation, your dog must receive proper treatment in your absence. Initially, your dog may be hospitalized for a few days to deal with any immediate crisis and to begin the insulin regulation process. For instance, if your dog is so sick that he has quit eating and drinking for several days, he may be experiencing “diabetic ketoacidosis,” which may require a several days of intensive care. On Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hormone Discovery May One Day Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

Diabetes Hormone Discovery May One Day Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

NEW YORKA new diabetes discovery may one day help people with the disease avoid frequent insulin shots. Scientists have identified a hormone, dubbed "betatrophin," that can sharply boost the number of cells that make insulin in mice. The discovery may someday lead to a treatment for Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease. People have their own version of this hormone, and the new work suggests that giving diabetics more of it might one remove the need to be treated with insulin injections. "If this could be used in people," said study author Dr. Douglas Melton, in a press release, "it could eventually mean that instead of taking insulin injections three times a day, you might take an injection of this hormone once a week or once a month, or in the best case maybe even once a year." That would give them better control of their blood sugar levels, said Melton, a professor at Harvard University's department of molecular and cellular biology. His study was published April 25 in the journal Cell. An estimated 371 million people worldwide have diabetes, in which insulin fails to control blood sugar levels. In the United States, an estimated 25.8 million people have the disease -- about 8.3 percent of the country, according to the American Diabetes Association. High blood sugar can lead to other medical problems, including heart disease, stroke and damage to kidneys, eyes and the nervous system. At least 90 percent of diabetes is "Type 2," and some of those patients have to inject insulin. Insulin is produced by beta cells in the pancreas. The researchers found when they made the liver in mice secrete more of the betatrophin hormone by inserting extra copies of a gene, the size of the beta cell population tripled in comparison to untreated mice. Tests indicated t Continue reading >>

Should I Use Diabetes Pills Or Insulin?

Should I Use Diabetes Pills Or Insulin?

Diabetes affects the way your body breaks down food. Treatment depends on which type of diabetes you have. In type 1 diabetes, your pancreas stops producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate glucose, or sugar, in your blood. Type 2 diabetes starts with insulin resistance. Your pancreas no longer produces enough insulin or doesn’t use it efficiently. Every cell in your body uses glucose for energy. If insulin isn’t doing its job, glucose builds up in your blood. This causes a condition called hyperglycemia. Low blood glucose is called hypoglycemia. Both can lead to serious complications. A variety of pills are available to treat diabetes, but they can’t help everyone. They only work if your pancreas still produces some insulin. They can’t treat type 1 diabetes. They aren’t effective in people with type 2 diabetes when the pancreas has stopped making insulin. Some people with type 2 diabetes can benefit from using both pills and insulin. Some pills to treat diabetes include: Biguanides Metformin (Glucophage, Fortamet, Riomet, Glumetza) is a biguanide. It lowers the amount of glucose in your liver and boosts insulin sensitivity. It may also improve cholesterol levels and might help you lose a little weight. People normally take it twice per day with meals. You can take the extended-release version once per day. Potential side effects include: upset stomach nausea bloating gas diarrhea a temporary loss of appetite It may also cause lactic acidosis in people with kidney failure, but this is rare. Sulfonylureas Sulfonylureas are fast-acting medications that help the pancreas release insulin after meals. They include: People usually take these medications once per day with a meal. Potential side effects include: irritability low blood glucose upset st Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

It is widely believed that those with Type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin if they have diabetes for long enough. However, only about 20-30 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes end up needing insulin injections. In this article, we will explore whether it is possible to manage your diabetes without insulin. If so, how can one do so and when they may eventually need insulin if other treatments do not work out? 1 Type 1 Diabetes disclaimer This article is not for people with Type 1 diabetes because it is imperative that people with Type 1 diabetes require insulin every day without question. A person with Type 1 diabetes produces very little, or no insulin. Without insulin, you cannot convert food into usable energy. Simply put, without insulin, a person with Type 1 diabetes cannot survive. 2 When Robert contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, he was concerned that one day he would have to take insulin shots for his Type 2 diabetes. He had heard a few of his friends with diabetes at church talking about how they had to take insulin injections. Robert was “afraid of needles,” and the thought of giving himself a shot scared him. Is Robert going to need to start taking insulin, or is there any way he can avoid it at this point? If he avoids it, what effects would this have on his health? Will he develop long term complications of diabetes if he doesn’t start giving himself shots of insulin? I suggest also reading these: At TheDiabetesCouncil, we decided to take a look at this particular question in depth, for Robert and for others with diabetes who might benefit from reading this information. Insulin isn’t the “bad guy.” Naturally, the fear of giving oneself an injection or “shot,” can increase anxiety and stress. But what if I told you that once you get past t Continue reading >>

Life With Insulin Injections

Life With Insulin Injections

When you have to start using insulin to control your diabetes, the thought can seem overwhelming. How can you learn when you need injections? How will the shots affect your job, social life, and hobbies like sports or traveling? The truth is that most insulin users can do just about anything they want. Once you get the hang of it, it’s not that hard to fit this medication into everyday life. "It can be a big change, but you'll soon realize that lots of people do this and it's not as big an inconvenience as you thought," says Erin Kelly, RN, a diabetes educator at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. Before you begin, sit down with a certified diabetes educator (your doctor can recommend one) to learn how to give yourself the shots and to figure out a routine that works for you. In the meantime, here’s a glimpse into how insulin injections might be part of your day-to-day life. A Day With Insulin If your doctor has prescribed insulin just once or twice a day -- which may be the case if you have type 2 diabetes -- then your diabetes care probably won't interfere with your daily life very much. In fact, you can probably leave your supplies at home while you're out and about for the day. Sometimes, the routine is more involved. If you have type 1 diabetes (or you have type 2 but it's not well-controlled), you may need three or four shots a day. Some of that insulin may be the "short-acting" type, which means you have to calculate how big your dose should be before you take it, usually before a meal. That means you’ll be testing your blood sugar with a glucose meter, doing some math, and then taking a shot. It can seem like a lot to learn at first, says Toby Smithson, a certified diabetes educator in Hilton Head, SC. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibrat Continue reading >>

Injecting

Injecting

Injections are often all that people think of when you mention diabetes. But if you're new to Type 1 diabetes, injecting yourself (or having someone else do it for you) can be quite easy. You can't get away from the need to inject, but these tips can make it a bit easier. There's no escaping the fact that injecting can be a bit uncomfortable, especially the first few because you may be tense and anxious. We can't guarantee that this will go away, but as you become more confident and relaxed, injecting will become easier. Where to inject Well, you have a choice of four main injection sites – your stomach, bum, arms or thighs. All these body parts have a wide skin area so you can inject in lots of different places within these sites. This is called 'rotating' your injection sites and is really important. If you keep injecting in the same place small lumps may build up under your skin. These will make injections less effective and you won't appreciate the lumps left behind. You might find your arms are a bit on the skinny side – most people's are when compared to, say, your legs. Talk to your nurse about whether it's OK for you to inject in your arms. When injecting just before you do some physical activity, avoid injecting the limb you are just about to use (for example, don't inject your thigh just before playing football). If you do inject the limb you are just about to use, this will speed up the action of insulin and make a hypo more likely. Heat can also speed up the action of your insulin after it has been injected, so be careful if it's a hot day. Other things, such as taking a hot bath or a massage, can have an effect too – so, if you are doing any of these things, you have to check your blood glucose levels more often. Your comments "I've been Type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes

Managing Diabetes

You can manage your diabetes and live a long and healthy life by taking care of yourself each day. Diabetes can affect almost every part of your body. Therefore, you will need to manage your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar. Managing your blood glucose, as well as your blood pressure and cholesterol, can help prevent the health problems that can occur when you have diabetes. How can I manage my diabetes? With the help of your health care team, you can create a diabetes self-care plan to manage your diabetes. Your self-care plan may include these steps: Ways to manage your diabetes Manage your diabetes ABCs Knowing your diabetes ABCs will help you manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Stopping smoking if you smoke will also help you manage your diabetes. Working toward your ABC goals can help lower your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes problems. A for the A1C test The A1C test shows your average blood glucose level over the past 3 months. The A1C goal for many people with diabetes is below 7 percent. Ask your health care team what your goal should be. B for Blood pressure The blood pressure goal for most people with diabetes is below 140/90 mm Hg. Ask what your goal should be. C for Cholesterol You have two kinds of cholesterol in your blood: LDL and HDL. LDL or “bad” cholesterol can build up and clog your blood vessels. Too much bad cholesterol can cause a heart attack or stroke. HDL or “good” cholesterol helps remove the “bad” cholesterol from your blood vessels. Ask your health care team what your cholesterol numbers should be. If you are over 40 years of age, you may need to take a statin drug for heart health. S for Stop smoking Not smoking is especially important for people with diabetes beca Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Injections

Diabetes And Injections

Tweet For many diabetics, injections are just a part of life. Yet a surprisingly high number of patients, and not just those who are newly diagnosed, find the injection process extremely upsetting. Needle phobia is common amongst diabetics. However, with practice and determination, diabetes injections can be made less painful through following our simple guide. Imagining the injection away Diabetes-related injections can be annoying and painful, as most patients will agree. In particular, the first few weeks and months can be the most difficult. For some diabetics, this does not go away. However, relaxing through the injection can make it easier, and being confident is the key to making injections less painful. Diabetic injection sites Choosing the right injection site for your individual diabetic needs is very important, and your diabetic healthcare team should be able to help you with this. There are four key diabetic injection areas. These are: Stomach Arms Thighs and Bum Within these sites, there are numerous smaller areas in which to inject. Although the idea of finding a place that you feel comfortable with may seem the best strategy, switching between injection sites is vital for the health of you your skin. Injecting in the same place time after time is quite dangerous, because small lumps can build up and make injected insulin less effective. Which injection site is best? Each of the four key injection sites are different, and the rate at which insulin is absorbed will differ depending on which one used. A general rule of thumb is that the stomach gets insulin to the blood most quickly, whilst the bum is the slowest route. What else affects how fast insulin enters the blood? For diabetics that inject insulin, injecting an area about to be used in physical activ Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy

Insulin Therapy

Why do I need to take insulin? When you digest food, your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells of your body and be used as energy. When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use it properly, so the glucose builds up in your blood instead of moving into the cells. Too much glucose in the blood can lead to serious health problems. All people who have type 1 diabetes and some people who have type 2 diabetes need to take insulin to help control their blood sugar levels. The goal of taking insulin is to keep your blood sugar level in a normal range as much as possible so you’ll stay healthy. Insulin can’t be taken by mouth. It is usually taken with injections (shots). It can also be taken with an insulin pen or an insulin pump. How often will I need to take insulin? You and your doctor will develop a schedule that is right for you. Most people who have diabetes and take insulin need at least 2 insulin shots a day for good blood sugar control. Some people need 3 or 4 shots a day. Do I need to monitor my blood sugar level? Yes. Monitoring and controlling your blood sugar is key to preventing the complications of diabetes. If you don’t already monitor your blood sugar level, you will need to learn how. Checking your blood sugar involves pricking your finger to get a small drop of blood that you put on a test strip. You can read the results yourself or insert the strip into a machine called an electronic glucose meter. The results will tell you whether or not your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Your doctor will give you additional information about monitoring your blood sugar. When should I take insulin? You and your doctor should discuss when and how you Continue reading >>

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Most people associate taking insulin with type 1 diabetes. However, some people with type 2 diabetes also need to take insulin. We talked with Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, Joslin Diabetes Center, to find out the truth about insulin and type 2 diabetes. Why would someone with type 2 diabetes who has been controlling their diabetes with diet and exercise need to start taking insulin? There are several reasons why someone would require insulin, even if they hadn’t needed it before. Temporary insulin usage– Some people need to take insulin for a short amount of time, because of things like pregnancy, surgery, broken bones, cancer, or steroidal medicines (like Prednisone). Permanent insulin usage - Sometimes the pancreas becomes unable to produce enough insulin. This happens frequently with aging. People can also become insulin resistant due to weight gain or chronic emotional or physical stress. Simply put, pills can no longer control diabetes. So, it’s not usually “bad” behavior that would cause someone to start insulin? Correct. However, non adherence to diet and exercise might result in high blood glucose levels that only insulin can control. Is insulin dosage different for someone who has type 2 rather than type 1? The doses will vary; either type may require very little or a lot of medication. It depends on weight, eating habits, exercise levels, existence of other illnesses and level of insulin resistance. Can someone start taking insulin and then not need to take it anymore? Absolutely! But only for those with type 2 diabetes. Often weight reduction and /or exercise can allow insulin to be stopped. Also, if any of the temporary situations listed above resolve, insulin might be stopped. Continue reading >>

All About Injections

All About Injections

A healthcare professional trained in injection techniques can teach you how to do it right The following recommendations apply to people with diabetes being treated with insulin injections or GLP-1 analogues (albiglutide (EperzanTM), dulaglutide (Trulicity®), exenatide (Byetta®), exenatide sustained release (Bydureon®) and liraglutide (Victoza®)). They are based on the Recommendations for Best Practice in Injection Technique (2015) from the Forum for Injection Technique (FIT). Preparing for injection Follow these important steps before an injection: Wash your hands and the injection site with soap and water, and dry well. If you use an alcohol swab (e.g.: in a hospital), let the skin dry completely before administering the injection. Check that the vial or cartridge has not passed its expiration date. Wipe the cartridge or vial with an alcohol swab. When using cloudy insulin, gently roll the cartridge, vial or pen device 10 times, then tip it (do not shake) 10 times. Finally, inspect it to ensure that the suspension has a consistently milky white appearance. Is a skin lift necessary? In adults, a skin lift is used in some situations, based on needle length and the amount of adipose (fat) tissue. A skin lift should be used when the needle is 8 mm or longer. In addition, in people whose arms and legs or abdomen have little fatty tissue, a skin fold might be justified when using a needle of 5 mm or 6 mm. A skinfold may not be necessary especially when using a 4 mm needle . A skin lift, if required, must be done properly to ensure that the medication is not injected into the muscle or not deeply enough. Injection areas In adults, the recommended injection areas are the following: abdomen thighs upper buttocks back of the upper arm (not a preferred area because of the di Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps 'more Effective Than Injections' For Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Pumps 'more Effective Than Injections' For Type 2 Diabetes

For patients with type 2 diabetes, managing the condition can involve multiple daily injections of insulin. But a new study published in The Lancet suggests that insulin pumps may be more effective for controlling blood sugar levels. This is not the first time a study has protested the benefits of insulin pumps. Last year, Medical News Today reported on a study suggesting that insulin pumps are better than insulin injections for type 1 diabetes. But the team involved in this latest study, led by Prof. Yves Reznik of the University of Caen Côte de Nacre Regional Hospital Center in France, claims theirs is the largest study to date that explores the effectiveness of insulin pumps for type 2 diabetes - the type that accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes is a condition whereby the body is unable to produce or use the hormone insulin effectively, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Over time, high blood sugar levels can cause nerve damage, stroke, and kidney, eye or heart diseases. In some cases, the condition can be managed through diet or blood sugar-lowering medication, such as metformin. But in many cases, a patient may require multiple daily doses of insulin delivered by injection into the abdomen, upper arms, thighs or buttocks. However, Prof. Reznik and colleagues note that around a third of patients that manage their condition with insulin injections have problems achieving the optimal level of blood sugar. With this in mind, the team decided to compare the effectiveness of insulin injections against insulin pumps - small portable, computerized devices that deliver continuous doses of insulin through a catheter places under the skin. Findings 'suggest insulin pumps are a valuable treatment option for type 2 diabetes' For their study, the resea Continue reading >>

Insulin Injections For Diabetics Just Once Monthly With New 'jelly' Substance Being Tested

Insulin Injections For Diabetics Just Once Monthly With New 'jelly' Substance Being Tested

Early stage tests suggest the new substance could dramatically cut the number of injections type 2 diabetics need, researchers at Duke University in America said. Traditional insulin needs to be injected frequently to keep blood sugar levels stable but even then it creates 'peaks and troughs' as the body processes it quickly which can cause complications. Scientists have been working to find a way to deliver the drug in an even way over time. Engineers have created a liquid that turns to jelly once injected under the skin and leaches out its active ingredient gradually. Tests on mice showed it kept blood sugar levels stable for five days, 120 times longer than normal. Related Articles Fizzy drinks linked to prostate cancer risk 28 Nov 2012 NHS care hit by more rationing, claims report 18 Nov 2012 Hundreds of patients subjected to NHS blunders 29 Oct 2012 Ashutosh Chilkoti, professor of biomedical engineering in Duke's Pratt School of Engineering, and lead author of the study said: "For a patient with type 2 diabetes, it would be much more desirable to inject such a drug once a week or once a month rather than once or twice a day. "Additionally, this approach avoids the peaks and valleys of drug concentrations that these patients often experience." Other drugs could be delivered in the same way. The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

More in diabetes