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Which Diabetes Can Be Prevented

12 Ways To Avoid Diabetes

12 Ways To Avoid Diabetes

Nearly 25 percent of Americans are thought to have prediabetes -- a condition of slightly elevated blood sugar levels that often develops into diabetes within 10 years -- but only 4 percent of people know it. What's worse, of those who are aware, less than half really tried to reduce their risk by losing weight, eating less, and exercising more. These are just a few of the good-for-you habits that can reverse prediabetes and ensure you never get the real thing, which can mean a lifetime of drugs and blood sugar monitoring, an increased risk of heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other scary health threats. Read on for 12 simple tricks everyone can start today. More from Prevention: 12 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Shedding even 10 pounds can significantly slash your risk. Even extremely overweight people were 70 percent less likely to develop diabetes when they lost just 5 percent of their weight -- even if they didn't exercise. If you weigh 175 pounds, that's a little less than 9 pounds! Use our calorie calculator to see how many calories you consume -- and how many you need to shave off your diet -- if you want to lose a little. 12 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Eating greens with a vinaigrette before a starchy entrée may help control your blood sugar levels. In an Arizona State University study, people with type 2 diabetes or a precursor condition called insulin resistance had lower blood sugar levels if they consumed about 2 tablespoons of vinegar just before a high-carb meal. "Vinegar contains acetic acid, which may inactivate certain starch-digesting enzymes, slowing carbohydrate digestion," said lead researcher Carol Johnston. In fact, vinegar's effects may be similar to those of the blood sugar -- lowering medication acarbose (Precose). Before you eat that fettuccine, enj Continue reading >>

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. That means there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. Around 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you maintain a healthy weight, you can reduce your risk of developing the condition. If you think that you may already have symptoms of diabetes, see your GP. There are no lifestyle changes that can lower your risk of type 1 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, you're at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. You can find out if you're a healthy weight by calculating your BMI using our healthy weight calculator. BMI and diabetes risk For most people in the UK, if your BMI is 25 or above, you are in the overweight range, while a BMI of 30 or above puts you in the obese range. However, some groups have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than white populations. These groups are advised to maintain a BMI lower than the standard 25. The advice is: Asians with a BMI score of 23 or more are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Asians with a BMI of 27.5 or more are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the evidence is less clear-cut, black people and other minority groups are also advised to maintain a BMI below 25, to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. Your waist and diabetes risk BMI isn't the only important measurement when it comes to your diabetes risk. Your waistline may also indicate that you're carrying extra body fat, and are therefore at risk. All women have an increased risk of diabetes if their waist measures more than 80cm (31.5 inches). White or black men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 94cm (37 inches). Asian men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 90cm (35 inches). Find out more about wh Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes In Children And Teens

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes In Children And Teens

Type 2 diabetes once hit mainly adults. But today, children and teens weigh more and are less active. As a result, people of all ages now get type 2 diabetes. Types of Diabetes in Children Type 1 diabetes was once called juvenile diabetes. It usually starts suddenly with weight loss, great thirst, and frequent urination. It tends to occur in thin or normal-weight people. Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin shots. Type 2 diabetes tends to occur in overweight people. It is also more common in people of African, Hispanic, Asian, or American-Indian ancestry. Type 2 diabetes often starts slowly. People may have vague symptoms or none at all. Some people can control their type 2 diabetes with a healthy diet and exercise. But others must take diabetes pills or insulin. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are by far the most common forms of diabetes. But in rare cases, children get other kinds of diabetes. Before Type 2 Diabetes Starts Some children and teens have a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Traits that are often found in people before they get type 2 diabetes are: Close relatives with type 2 diabetes High cholesterol levels Dark patches of skin, often on the back of the neck High blood pressure High triglyceride (a kind of fat) levels High blood glucose levels Low HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels The risks for heart disease and diabetes increase for those who have high triglycerides, high blood glucose, low HDL cholesterol, and high blood pressure and who are overweight. How to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is partly genetic. Even so, it can be prevented or delayed in most cases. The key is a healthy lifestyle. Food choices. The healthiest diet is one high in plant foods and low in salt and saturated fats (which are found in meat and also in dairy pr Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Around three in five cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. However you’ve found out you’re at risk – and knowing is a big first step – the important thing to do now is take action to lower your risk. Evidence shows the best way to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes is by: eating better moving more reducing your weight if you’re overweight Where do I start? The key is to find what works for you, fits in with your day and you enjoy. 1. Set clear goals Setting goals can help you break down what you need to do and how to do it. Use our Action Plan (PDF, 66KB)to set healthy goals and keep aFood and activity diary (PDF, 40KB)to keep you on track. 2. Plan ahead It’s helpful to plan meals for the week ahead especially when we all lead busy lives. This can help you reach your goal to eat better and stick to a budget. 3. Start to make healthy changes Time to put your plan into action. Each healthy choice you make is helping you to achieve your goal. If you find it hard, don’t give up – start again tomorrow. 4. Be creative Eating healthily doesn’t have to be boring. Take the opportunity to try new recipes and new food. 5. Sleep well Get a good night’s sleep. Research has shown that if you are tired you feel hungrier and are more likely to want fatty and sugary foods. This can make it harder to stick to your goals. What changes can I make to eat better? Eating better doesn’t have to mean boring or tasteless. We've got plenty of tools, tips and recipes to help you eat healthier. We've got healthier versions of your favourite recipes, or follow our videos and learn to cook a new recipe. How can I move more every day? Getting active and staying active will reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, and you’ll feel great too. If you're not sur Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Tweet When people talk about prevention of diabetes, it is usually about preventing type 2 diabetes. In the majority of cases, type 2 diabetes is brought on by lifestyle factors which can often be prevented. These include an unbalanced diet, lack of activity, lack of sleep, stress, smoking and alcohol. By making lifestyles changes, you can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes prevention overview Leading doctors and researchers point to excessive levels of insulin as the likely reason why insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes develops. Strategies such as low-carb diets and exercise help to reduce levels of insulin and are therefore effective for preventing type 2 diabetes from developing. There are a number of risk factors for diabetes, some of which are preventable, such as weight gain around the middle (central obesity), high cholesterol/triglyceride levels and high blood pressure. Losing weight, adopting more activity into your day, stopping smoking and reducing alcohol intake can also help towards lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and improving your all-round health. Diet and preventing type 2 diabetes Diet is the most important part of lifestyle change. The adage that you can’t outrun a bad diet is true. It is much easier to lose weight on a good diet even if you are struggling to do exercise, than it is through exercise if you’re eating a poor diet. Effective diets to prevent type 2 diabetes are those that do not cause your body to produce a lot of insulin. Carbohydrate has the biggest demand on insulin and so any diet that helps reduce carbohydrate intake will help towards reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes. Cutting out sugary food and drink and refined grains such as white bread and white rice is a good Continue reading >>

How Can I Prevent Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Prevent Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Question:How can I prevent type 1 or type 2 diabetes? Answer:There are usually two flavors of diabetes. Type 1 used to be called juvenile onset diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes. And it is caused by an attack by your own immune system -- (it's) called an autoimmune disease -- on the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. So what happens is that over time, usually during childhood, this autoimmune attack attacks your pancreas just like it would happen if it was a bacterium and it destroys these beta cells. There is no way, currently, that we know of, to prevent type 1 diabetes. Children or young adults or even older people who get it, there is really little that we can do to either slow down or prevent the development of this disease. Type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult onset diabetes because it most often affects people beyond the age of 45 or 50, is the really the epidemic form of diabetes and it is associated with increasing weight, obesity, decreasing life style. In addition, it more commonly occurs in people of racial minorities. So for example, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans and American Indians are more likely to get this form of diabetes. Since the risk factors that lead to this form of diabetes include increasing weight and decreasing activity levels, it shouldn't be surprising that there have been a number of studies that have been performed, including one called the Diabetes Prevention Program, that showed that you can prevent this disease from occurring if you lose weight and if you increase your activity level. In the Diabetes Prevention Program, the volunteers there lost about 7 percent, which was about for them about 15 pounds of weight and increased their activity level by walking about 30 minutes most evenings or Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Diet In Order To Lower My Bad Cholesterol (ldl) And Raise My Hdl, Prevent High Blood Pressure, Prevent Type 2 Diabetes, Have A Good A1c And A Low Glycemic Index, And Keep A Healthy Heart?

What Is The Best Diet In Order To Lower My Bad Cholesterol (ldl) And Raise My Hdl, Prevent High Blood Pressure, Prevent Type 2 Diabetes, Have A Good A1c And A Low Glycemic Index, And Keep A Healthy Heart?

Chronic inflammation is an increasingly common health condition that contributes to heart disease,diabetes, obesity arthritis and metabolic syndrome. Caused by a number of environmental factors including eating processed foods, saturated fats, sugar, and chemicals, inflammation is a dangerous condition that mimics many other serious health issues. Fortunately, there are a number of natural foods that reduce inflammation levels in the body - these include fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, whole grains, and certain spices. Increasing the amount of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet is perhaps the most important step in preventing inflammation in the body. 3 of the Top Anti-Inflammatory Diet Foods include: Ginger With over 500 natural compounds, ginger has a number of health benefits - including calming an upset stomach, preventing motion sickness, and reducing inflammation. While science has yet discovered exactly how fresh ginger reduces inflammation in the body, it has been shown to reduce inflammation that contributes to arthritis and various cancers. Vitamin C Found in grapefruit, oranges, lemons and many vegetables, vitamin C is most commonly known for its cold fighting abilities. However, vitamin c is also a powerful antioxidant that reduces the harmful effects of stress and teams with vitamin E to serve as a very effective anti inflammatory food. Being water-soluble, vitamin C is not stored in the body; meaning it needs to be consumed throughout the day to maintain appropriate levels. Since the typical American diet is low in vitamin C, 1,000 to 4,000 mg a day through fresh fruit, vegetables, or supplement is recommended. Omega 3 and Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) Omega 3 and Essential Fatty Acids are good, healthy fats that assist in preventing heart disease, joint pa Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Prevention

Type 1 Diabetes Prevention

Currently, there is no way to prevent type 1 diabetes. Researchers are still working to fully understand what causes or triggers type 1; without fully understanding that, it’s difficult to prevent the disease. Type 1 diabetes isn’t like type 2 diabetes, which at times can be prevented by taking good care of your body—watching your diet and staying physically fit and active. You can learn more about type 2 prevention in our article. With type 1 diabetes, you can stave off or prevent the short-term and long-term complications of the disease. By reading our article on type 1 complications, you can learn more about how to stave off or even avoid eye, nerve, kidney, and heart disease. Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is an epidemic in the United States, with about 29 million people who have it, another 8 million who are undiagnosed and 86 million who are considered pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form, is a disease in which the body’s cells don’t use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to get glucose into the cells, but over time, the pancreas can’t make enough to keep blood glucose levels normal and the result is type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes increases a person’s risk for several health conditions including high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. It’s also responsible for as many as 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., three times higher than previous estimates, a January 2017 study in the journal PLOS ONE found. Although genetics can increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, both diet and exercise also play a big role. In fact, people with pre-diabetes who lost just 5 to 7 percent of their body weight reduced their risk by 54 percent, a study out of John Hopkins in July 2013 found. Here, experts weigh in with 10 foods that balance your blood sugar and can prevent diabetes: 1. Apples You might think fruit is off the menu because of its sugar content, but fruit is filled with vitamins and nutrients that can help ward off diabetes. Apples are one of the best fruits you can eat because they’re rich in quercetin, a plant pigment. Quercetin helps the body secrete insulin more efficiently and wards off insulin resistance, which occurs when the body has to make more and more insulin to help glucose enter the cells. Insulin resistance is the hallmark characteristic of type 2 diabetes. “It’s filled with antioxidants, and also there’s fiber in the fruit that nat Continue reading >>

How Do You Prevent Getting Type 2 Diabetes?

How Do You Prevent Getting Type 2 Diabetes?

People will often look first at diet in this scenario. This makes sense, type 2 diabetes is strongly influenced by lifestyle. Changing your diet though can be hard. You should make the effort to change your diet, but I personally think there is an easier way to have a big impact quickly. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is a very good way of dropping insulin sensitivity, often quite dramatically. You needn't set huge chunks of time aside for this, barely an hour per week can dramatically reduce your health risks (not just diabetes). Without getting into the specifics of how HIIT works, the main thing you need to know is how easy and effective it is to implement. The session can involve your favorite exercise (or least hated), running, cycling, swimming, rowing, even weights can be effective. As a simple rule of thumb, you want to be doing maximal effort for a short duration, followed by a quick recovery period and then repeat. Example: (20 second max effort cycle, 40 seconds slow pace cycle) x 10 Total Time/Week: 10 minutes session x 3 sessions per week = 30 minutes As meager as this sounds, it could have a surprising health impact. HIIT can even be used as training for long endurance events, such is its impact on fitness. I currently use HIIT extensively for my Ironman Triathlon training. WARNING: Consult your doctor about the safety of HIIT for you before attempting it. Due to the nature of maximal effort, you will be training close to your maximum heart-rate, in your anaerobic zone. This is not something you want to just try if your haven't exercised in years, nor if you have a heart condition. Continue reading >>

9 Ways To Prevent Type 1 Diabetes Complications

9 Ways To Prevent Type 1 Diabetes Complications

How to Master Type 1 Diabetes Management Having type 1 diabetes puts you at greater risk for a number of health complications including infection, kidney failure, and blindness. But by controlling your blood sugar, you can prevent or delay the onset of many of these complications. Making healthy lifestyle changes, such as eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly, and taking your diabetes medications as prescribed can help you manage your blood sugar. Need a target goal? Your A1C, the blood test that indicates your average blood sugar over a three-month period, is an excellent starting point. "If you keep your A1C under 7, it will help prevent complications," says Sarfraz Zaidi, MD, director of the Jamila Diabetes and Endocrine Medical Center and an endocrinologist at Los Robles Hospital and Medical Center in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Continue reading >>

Can Having Diabetes Cause Hallucinations? How Can These Be Prevented?

Can Having Diabetes Cause Hallucinations? How Can These Be Prevented?

While during “chronic” state diabetes may not directly related to hallucination, it is logical to think the acute conditions in diabetic patients as a precipitating factor to hallucinations. Hypoglycaemia, as well as hyperglycaemia may pose metabolic derangement and cause the fluctuating disturbance of consciousness, also known as delirium. Delirium presents with myriad signs and symptoms, including disorientation, cognitive impairments, emotional instability, delusion, as well as hallucinations. The hallucinations often described as visual, rather than auditoric type (which is often seen is psychiatric-state). Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes From Becoming Diabetes

5 Ways To Prevent Prediabetes From Becoming Diabetes

Prediabetes, or elevated blood sugar, puts you at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, especially if you are overweight, but you can take steps to prevent it. Type 2 diabetes is not inevitable. More than 86 million American adults—approximately one-third of those over age 18 and half of those over 65—have prediabetes, and most of them don’t even know it. If you have prediabetes, it means your blood sugar levels are consistently higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes puts you at higher-than-normal risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control, up to 30% of overweight men and women with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years of diagnosis. You don’t have to be one of them! Here are five steps you can take to reduce your diabetes risk. Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

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