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Which Are The Best Fruits For Diabetics?

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Ex-Diabetic Sidebar: When I was diabetic, my doctors and the hospital's dietitian told me that I would have to avoid fruits. I found that kind of strange, especially, since some of my hospital meals included applesauce, tangerine slices and orange juice! Avoiding fruits was difficult for me because I had a "sweet tooth" -- a strong craving for sweets. Being diabetic, my body craved sugar and I loved sweets -- not just fruits -- I loved apple pie, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and ice cream. During my research, I discovered how to stop the cravings (see below). I also learned that eating some whole fruit can be beneficial, despite the sugar content in most fruits. Why? Because it's better to eat an apple than some cookies or ice cream to satisfy your craving for something sweet! :-) In addition, studies have shown that the nutrients within most fruits (e.g. antioxidants, Vitamin C, fiber, water) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. The key is to make sure that you follow an effective reverse diabetes nutritional program such as the one defined in the "Death to Diabetes" 10-Step Reverse Diabetes Wellness Program. Most whole fruits are on the moderate to low end of the Glycemic Index (GI), making them a pretty good choice for most people with diabetes. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as water,fiber and antioxidants (flavonoids) such as catechin, quercetin, and anthocyanidin. Top 10 Fruits | Reverse Diabetes The following is a list of the top 10 fruits that most diabetics can eat because, for most diabetics, these fruits don't cause large or sustained blood glucose spikes. As a result, eating these fruits can help to satisfy your sweet to Continue reading >>

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Many people think that diabetics have to avoid many foods, including different fruits. However, there are super healthy fruits for diabetics because they provide important minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals and fiber. Some low-carb fruits are also good for diabetics. People who have this disease should care about the ratings of the glycemic index to measure the carbohydrates which are converted to the blood Gl. Scientifically, the suitable glycemic index for diabetics is below 50. The following are the top 19 good fruits for diabetics and high blood pressure. Let’s check out these fruits to control your blood sugar and cure diabetes naturally. 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure Revealed! 1. Apples (Gl: 38, Gl/a fresh apple: 150g:7) Apples are very high in vitamin C, antioxidants and fiber. Apple pulp and peel contain pectin which helps to detoxify your body and remove harmful waste from the body. Pectin also is high in galacturonic acid that can help diabetics lower their insulin requirements up to 30%. You can eat a fresh apple or toss some slices of apples into a cup of tea and enjoy your breakfast. A medium apple contains about 12 g of carbohydrates and 54 calories. You can eat fresh apples without peeling them because apple peel includes a good source of anti-oxidants that good for digestion. Furthermore, apples are available throughout any seasons of the year. For containing a large amount of the soluble fiber, apples are fruit good for diabetics. Apples help diabetes patients reduce cholesterol, normalize their blood sugar level and improve their bowel function. Apple is also good at eliminating inflammation in the body and help diabetics beat infections effectively. Besides, apple is rich in anti-oxidants that help boost immunity. Apple also h Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is diabetes? When a food containing carbohydrate is eaten, your body digests the carbohydrate into sugar (called glucose), which can then be used as energy by the cells in your body. Diabetes is a condition where your body can’t properly control the amount of glucose in your blood. A hormone called insulin is needed for transferring glucose from the bloodstream to enter the body cells and be converted to energy. In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are often higher than normal because either the body does not produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). High levels of glucose in the bloodstream can lead to short term complications such as: passing large amounts of urine being extremely thirsty and drinking lots of fluids being tired having blurred vision having frequent skin infections and being slow to heal Blood glucose levels are normally between about 4.0 and 8.0 mmol/L. People with diabetes should aim for blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible, but individual targets should always be discussed with your diabetes health care professional. Controlling diabetes is important to prevent serious long term complications such as: heart and circulation problems infections kidney disease eye problems, which can lead to blindness nerve damage to the lower limbs and other parts of the body Types of diabetes There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes affects less than 1% of all Australians. It can appear at any age, but most commonly in childhood and early adult life. People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce enough insulin, and therefore they must inject themselves with insulin several times a day. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 7.1 % of a Continue reading >>

Best Fruits For Diabetics To Eat

Best Fruits For Diabetics To Eat

No fruit is a bad fruit; it’s just that when you have diabetes, it is important to control your blood glucose levels at all times, which means that you also have to look at the glycaemic index (GI) of foods. GI is a measure of the effects of carbohydrate-rich foods such as fruit on blood sugar levels. Because fruits are often eaten on their own, GI is an important consideration while consuming them. Fruits with a low glycaemic index (GI value of 55 or less) are a safe choice for diabetics as they help to regulate blood sugar levels better. Even though some fruits are very sweet, they are still generally low-GI, which makes them an excellent substitute for unhealthy sweet snacks (such as chocolate and sweets) or savoury snacks, which should be avoided by diabetics. Here is a list of fruits that are safe for diabetics. Image: Getty Continue reading >>

These Are The Best Fruits For Preventing Diabetes

These Are The Best Fruits For Preventing Diabetes

In a study published in the BMJ in July 2013, researchers from Harvard University found that eating whole fruits can reduce the risk of developing type-2 diabetes, but some are more effective than others at warding off the disease. The report used data from three long-running health studies that included 151,209 women and 36,173 men, where participants sent back questionnaires about their lifestyle, diet, and health — specifically any diseases they'd developed — every few years for at least two decades. The researchers asked about 10 fruits: grapes or raisins, peaches, plums or apricots, prunes, bananas, cantaloupe, apples or pears, oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, and blueberries. Blueberries were most effective in preventing diabetes, followed by grapes and then apples. Bananas and grapefruit were also good. Strawberries did not have much of an effect and cantaloupe slightly increased the risk for type 2 diabetes. See the chart below: BMJ On the flip side, drinking all kinds of fruit juice, including apple, orange, and grapefruit, was associated with a higher risk of the disease. Replacing three servings of fruit juice each week with blueberries decreased the risk of type 2 diabetes by 33% on average, according to the study. People with type 2 diabetes do not make enough of the hormone insulin, which pulls sugar (glucose) out of the bloodstream and into our cells to be stored and released later. Without enough insulin, bloodsugar hits spikes and troughs. Researchers suggest that blueberries, red grapes, and apples may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes because they contain high levels of anthocyanins, which have been shown to increase glucose uptake in mice with diabetes. Continue reading >>

15 Best Fruits For Diabetics That All You Need To Know

15 Best Fruits For Diabetics That All You Need To Know

Diabetes is basically a disorder in the metabolism of the human body which promotes unwanted excessive thrust and high amount of production of urine. In today’s world, there are numerous ways to treat diabetes which includes the injection procedure, medicine procedure, etc. At the same time, the consumption of a number of healthy in considerable amount is crucial, which, however, many people neglect. Fruits have tons of benefits regarding diseases and when it comes to diabetes, the importance of certain fruits cannot be neglected. Fruits which are meant to manage blood sugar should be in digested at the time of recovery of diabetes. We all know that going natural and eating natural and herbal stuff is always beneficial and effective for our system. Thus for your best convenience, we have arranged a list of some of the most effective fruits for diabetics that should be eaten at the time of recovering from diabetes to diabetic patients. Best Fruits For Diabetes In India: Below are the top 15 Fruits For Diabetics that are good for completely cure your diabetes problem. This fruits diet is very helpful for diabetic patients. You can buy anywhere in India these fruits for diabetic patients. 1. Kiwi: If you are diabetes patient then you should eat fruits which lower your blood sugar level. From a number of health experiments, experts have found that consumption of Kiwi can reduce the blood sugar level at a considerable rate which is perfect for diabetes patients. Low blood sugar level and the fruit kiwi go hand in hand. Kiwi is one of the best fruits for diabetes. 2. Black Jamun: Black Jamun is one of the best fruits for diabetes patients. It improves the blood sugar level effectively. Proper intake of this fruit has improved the condition of a number of diabetic patients. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

While there's no substitute for a balanced healthy diet, adding certain foods may help those with diabetes keep sugar levels under control. Coffee and cinnamon have made headlines as foods that might be able to help cut the risk of diabetes or help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. However, don't get the idea that such foods are magic pills for your diabetic diet. It's still important for people with diabetes to eat a balanced healthy diet and exercise to help manage the condition. Nevertheless, some foods, such as white bread, are converted almost immediately to blood sugar, causing a quick spike. Other foods, such as brown rice, are digested more slowly, causing a lower and gentler change in blood sugar. If you are trying to follow a healthy diet for diabetes, here are 6 suggestions that may help to keep your blood sugar in check. Porridge Porridge can help control blood sugar and the charity Diabetes UK recommends it to see you through the morning. Even though porridge is a carbohydrate, it's a very good carbohydrate. Because it's high in soluble fibre, it's slower to digest and it won't raise your blood sugar as much or as quickly. It's going to work better at maintaining a healthy blood sugar level over time. Not only does this high-quality carbohydrate offer a steadier source of energy than white bread, it can also help with weight loss. The soluble fibre in oats helps to keep us feeling fuller longer. That's important for people with type 2 diabetes, who tend to be overweight. If you reduce the weight, you usually significantly improve the glucose control. Barley isn't as popular as oats, but there's some evidence that barley, which is also high in soluble fibre, may also help with blood glucose control. Besides oats and barley, most whole grains are going to Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Most of us take it for granted that we can eat whatever we like, although it may have an unwanted effect on our waistline. But diabetics have to be much more careful with what they consume, as their inability to produce any, or enough, insulin, means their blood sugar levels can become dangerously high if they eat whatever they fancy. [Read more: 6 surprising cholesterol-busting foods] [Revealed: Why am I always hungry? 6 reasons you’re feeling starving] However, as World Diabetes Day is marked on November 14, Diabetes UK points out that no foods are totally off-limits for diabetics – they just need to eat carefully. Libby Dowling, senior clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains: “If you have diabetes – whatever the type – no food is out of bounds, but you should aim for a healthy, balanced diet, just as everyone should. This is a diet which is low in sugar, salt and saturated fats and includes plenty of fruit and vegetables. “It’s fine to have a treat now and again, but maintaining a healthy diet most of the time can help you to manage your diabetes, and is good for your general health too.” Here are some suggestions for the best and worst foods to eat when you're diabetic: Frozen grapes Instead of sweets, try these fruity little gems, which turn into a creamy sorbet-style healthy snack when frozen. Although there are fruit sugars in them, there's less sugar than there is in sweets, and fruit's packed with vitamins, minerals and fibre. Sweet potatoes Sweet potatoes have been shown to stabilise blood sugar levels in diabetics by lowering insulin resistance. They also contain high amounts of fibre, which helps reduce levels of 'bad' LDL cholesterol, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. Almonds Eating almonds can help people with type 2 diabetes to Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

Diabetes And The Foods You Eat

The foods you eat are made of 3 basic nutrients: carbohydrates, fat, and protein. All of these nutrients provide calories (energy) that allow your body cells to function properly. Why do I need a meal plan? A balanced meal plan is important for everyone. If you have diabetes, eating properly balanced meals and snacks is even more important. Food is an important tool that you can use to control diabetes and stay healthy. Carbohydrate counting adds variety to your meals and still allows you to control your blood glucose. Ask a registered dietitian how carbohydrate counting can be incorporated into your lifestyle. Eating a balanced meal plan can help you: Control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Control blood pressure. Maintain a healthy weight or reduce your weight, if you are overweight. Prevent low blood glucose reactions. Reduce the risk of health problems caused by diabetes. How do I get a meal plan? To plan the amount of foods that you eat, you should meet with a registered dietitian who will help you develop a meal plan that is right for you. This plan will be based on your individual health goals. Do I have to count every bite? No. But you will need to be aware of what and how much you are eating and the right portions of foods. The number one goal of the meal plan is to control blood glucose levels with an even distribution of carbohydrates at meals and snacks. Here are some basic guidelines: Follow the meal plan set with your dietitian. Eat a variety of foods every day to get all the nutrients you need. Eat only the amount of food in your meal plan. Eat about the same amount of food each day. Be aware of portion sizes. Do not skip meals. Eat meals and snacks at regular times every day. Distribute meals 4 to 5 hours apart, with snacks in between. If you are taking a Continue reading >>

Which Fruit Is Good In Diabetes.?

Which Fruit Is Good In Diabetes.?

Answer Wiki When you leave your doctor’s office, do you ever wonder what he’s not telling you? Here’s 3 tricks to manage your diabetes that your doctor won’t tell you: Eat More Fat You read that right. Eat more fat. That’s because fat helps your body absorb insulin. That means the more fat you eat, the easier it’ll be to manage your blood sugar. But here’s the kicker: It’s got to be the right type of fat. You’re looking for Unsaturated Omega-3 Fat. Here’s some great sources: Fish Eggs (Any eggs labeled “enriched” have plenty of omega-3) Grass-fed beef (There’s lots of omega-3 in the grass) Do Some Pushups… Or any kind of strength exercises. All the cardio your doctor tells you to do will increase your insulin absorption a little, but to really keep your body regulated you’ve got to get your entire body moving. The best way to do that is any exercise that focuses on strength. You want to avoid straining yourself, but make a habit of doing a few pushups every day, throw in some body squats, and soon you’ll be taking tighter control of your blood sugar. Not to mention it’ll get rid of stress, and give you plenty of energy. Relax Laying back and keeping cool are vital to regulating your blood sugar. Stress causes physical distress on the body which affects blood glucose levels. Not to mention, when you’re stressed out it’s easy to overeat, which obviously wreaks havoc on your blood sugar. For easy relaxation, try out simple meditation or breathing exercises. These tricks will help, but… If You Want to REVERSE your Type 2 Diabetes and never worry about your blood sugar again, here’s what you need: A recent medical breakthrough at Newcastle University has revealed 3 Proven Steps to Reverse Type-2 Diabetes. Click the link below to find Continue reading >>

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Eating Well With Diabetes: South Indian And Sri Lankan Diets

Many staple foods in the South Indian diet are good for your health. From fresh guava to lentils to vegetarian cuisine, there are lots of nutrient-rich choices. However, deep fried items, high-fat foods and refined flour are also common and should be limited. If you have diabetes, you can work with your healthcare team to develop a plan that is right for you. It will likely include exercise, a meal plan, blood sugar monitoring and perhaps medication. This article will focus on the dietary changes that you can make. Diabetes information in other languages! Call EatRight Ontario at 1-877-510-510-2 to get practical tips and information on managing diabetes in: Gujrati, Pakistani, Punjabi and Urdu. This information will tell you which of your favourite traditional foods fit into a healthy diet and which should be limited to help you manage diabetes. What is type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When the body is working well, insulin helps carry sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells where it is used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body's cells do not receive enough glucose, so it stays in your blood. High blood glucose (or high blood sugar) can lead to heart, kidney, vision and blood vessel problems. Who has a higher risk of diabetes? Some ethnic groups in Canada have a higher risk of getting diabetes, including people of South Asian descent. There are certain genes that affect insulin function. Having these genes increases your risk of diabetes. These genes are commonly found in high risk populations such as people with South Asian heritage. What to eat…and when If you have diabetes, it is important to eat every 4 to 6 hours Continue reading >>

Avoid Fruit With Diabetes?

Avoid Fruit With Diabetes?

Fruits provide us with health-enhancing vitamins and phytochemicals as well as fiber, all important components of our diets, and there is no reason why people with diabetes should forego these benefits. However, you may have to be careful about the fruits you choose, how often you eat them and when you eat them. If you take a look at the glycemic index (GI), a measure of how fast carbohydrate foods (which include fruits) are converted in the body to blood glucose, you’ll see that there are big differences between fruits. I recommend choosing fruits that rank low on the glycemic index. Low rankings are those that score below 55, intermediate-GI foods score between 55 and 70 and high GI foods score above 70. For example, some good fruit choices would include an average-sized apple that scores 38; cherries, which score 22; grapefruit (25); an average-sized orange (44); an average-sized pear (38); a plum (39). Intermediate GI fruits include banana (55); cantaloupe (65); mango (55); papaya (58); pineapple (66). High GI fruits include dried dates (103); and canned fruit cocktail (79). How quickly fruit will raise your blood sugar depends on such considerations as whether you eat the fruit after a high-fat meal or drink it as a glass of fruit juice on an empty stomach. You’ll also want to consider what your blood-sugar level is when you eat the fruit. If you’re monitoring your blood glucose, you should be able to figure out how it responds to eating fruit. It is also important to pay attention to the size of the fruit you eat – choose a small or medium-sized apple over a large one (or eat only half of the large one). A quick and easy measure of the right serving size of fruit is the amount that can comfortably fit in the palm of your hand. Anything bigger than that is Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

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