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Where To Buy Diabetic Test Strips

Testing: How Accurate Are Diabetes Test Strips?

Testing: How Accurate Are Diabetes Test Strips?

Testing: How Accurate Are Diabetes Test Strips? Its important to monitor your blood glucose level in order for you to control it. And thats why diabetes test strips play an important role. Blood glucose test strips are small disposable plastic strips which, although may appear insignificant, play a very significant role when it comes to helping people living with diabetes to appropriately monitor and control the condition. Trying to save money by skipping a blood test is like trying to cut corners. Uncontrolled blood sugar could lead to complications that will require more expensive treatments and medications in the long run. However, the question is, how accurate are test strips? Even though blood diabetes test strips may not always be accurate, they are still very close to being accurate and are better off than not keeping an eye on your blood sugar at all. Test strips work by placing blood on the strip. The blood reacts with an enzyme on the strip called glucose oxidase to produce gluconic acid using glucose in the blood. At the other end of the strip, which is connected to the glucometer, the meter sends a current to the strip. With the electric terminals on the strip, the meter will be able to measure the current between the terminals. The amount of gluconic acid produced from the blood glucose determines the amount of current produced between the terminals. The meter then makes use of an algorithm to calculate the blood glucose level based on the difference in current. However, even as the manufacturers of these strips strive to make sure they are as accurate as much as possible, there is always a margin of error. This is the unfortunate trade-off that comes with having equipment that is both easy to use and small. Even though there is a margin of error that coul Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much? (part 2)

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much? (part 2)

Last week I was busy being blown away by the amazing technology of glucose test strips. But back to reality. Why do these things cost so much? Why do prices vary by 600% or more? From what I can tell on Consumer Reports, customer reviews, articles like this one in Diabetes Forecast, and comments on diabetes blogs, it seems like most meters and strips have pretty similar quality. So how do you choose? Meters have a variety of features. Some have backlights, which is nice in the dark. Some speak to you, which helps people with poor vision. Some can store more results in memory. Some hook to your computer or smart phone with a cable to upload results; others connect with wireless; others don’t have that function. Some create graphs for you of various types. Meters are temperature sensitive. Some can function at higher temperatures; others can work at lower temperatures. Some burn through batteries faster than others. Some seem to need a little more blood than others to get a reading. Diabetes Forecast says meters are so similar that some people just buy the cheapest one, and it works for them. But most meters are cheap. The cost comes in the strips. So the best meter might be the one with the most affordable strips. When it comes to strip cost, the mega-retailers like Walmart, Walgreens, and Kroger have an advantage. And the quality seems comparable. One user commented that Strips for [Walmart Prime] run $9.00 per fifty, a $60 cost reduction from my Accu-Chek strips which are $69 at Costco. On a typical reading of 180 the meters will be maybe two points different. Pretty darn close. But that cost advantage only holds if you don’t have insurance. A lot of insurers will pay for Accu-Chek, OneTouch, or some more expensive strips, but won’t pay for a Walmart Prime or Wal Continue reading >>

Why You Shouldnt Buy Diabetes Test Strips From Resellers

Why You Shouldnt Buy Diabetes Test Strips From Resellers

Weve all seen the roadside signs or posters nailed to telephone poles. Unnamed sellers offer to buy unused test strips for people with diabetes . You may even see these supplies on online sites such as eBay, where test strips may be resold. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy What do they really offer? Inexpensive but unreliable, possibly unsafe blood glucose monitoring equipment and test strips. When you buy glucose meter kits and test strips from certified distributors, they have to pay attention to how they are stored and the expiration dates, says endocrinologist Betul Hatipoglu, MD . So there are multiple dangers when you buy from uncertified resellers. Dr. Hatipoglu cites a variety of potential health concerns. Strips purchased from these suppliers could have been stored improperly, exposing the strips to excessive heat or cold. This change in temperature causes damage to the testchil strips. Also, they may be expired or possibly even counterfeit. All of that means a higher chance of inaccurate test results if you use them. [Tweet For safe blood glucose test strips, avoid buying from uncertified resellers. #diabetes] Last year, Nova Max, one of the major manufacturers of test strips, issued a recall for defective test strips and meter kits. These products were reporting false, abnormally high blood glucose results. The company promptly notified all legitimate, registered users, health care professionals, pharmacies and distributors. The products were removed from legitimate sellers shelves. Unregistered third-party resellers, however, did not receive a notice. That means they didnt know they were supposed to remove the suppl Continue reading >>

Comparing The Cost Of Diabetes Test Strips At Major Retailers

Comparing The Cost Of Diabetes Test Strips At Major Retailers

Where’s the best place to buy blood glucose monitor test strips over-the-counter? And which test strips are the most affordable? We took a look at the top blood sugar test strip costs at a few of the major retailers to see what the best deals are. Hands down, the ReliOn brand of test strips is the most affordable if you’re paying for test strips out-of-pockt at a meager 18 cents per strip (in a 50 count box) at Walmart and 35 cents (in a 50 count box) if you buy on Amazon. However, it’s only available at Walmart (and Amazon), so that can make it difficult if there isn’t a Walmart in your area. The next most affordable test strip is the Bayer Contour Next, which came it between 77 cents and 86 cents per strip in their 50 count boxes if you buy them at a brick-and-mortar store, or 24 cents per strip on Amazon. Lifescan’s One Touch Ultra Blue, Roche’s Accuchek Aviva, and Abbott’s Freestyle Lite came in at well over a dollar a strip at all the major pharmacy retailers, but all of them in under a dollar a strip if you buy on Amazon. Roche’s Accuchek Aviva came in as the most expensive test strip at every retailer, except Amazon, where it came in a whole 5 cents cheaper than One Touch Ultra Blue. Amazon is for the most part the most affordable place to buy your test strips out-of-pocket, unless you’re buying Walmart’s ReliOn test strips. In that case, you’re better off just driving to Walmart. Here’s the full breakdown: Walmart One Touch Ultra Blue – 50 count: $68.79 / $1.37 per strip Freestyle Lite – 50 count: $81.64 / $1.63 per strip Bayer Contour Next – 50 count: $38.88 / $.77 per strip ReliOn Prime – 50 count: $9.00 / $.18 per strip AccuChek Aviva Plus – 50 count: $82.27 / $1.64 per strip Walgreens One Touch Ultra Blue – 50 count: $79.9 Continue reading >>

Selling Diabetic Test Strips On Ebay & Other Sites

Selling Diabetic Test Strips On Ebay & Other Sites

Selling Diabetic Test Strips on eBay & Other Sites Before we get started, there are three things you need to know about theDiabetic Test Strip Market: Diabetic Test Strips have one of the highest sell-through-rates of anyproduct on eBay. Selling Diabetic Test Strips is one of the fastest ways to start makingmoney online. Many sellers see income within a week or 10-days. Start-up costs are very low. Most sellers start with less than $100 -anda few with as little as $25. If you scan this article, it may seem really complicated and difficult -butit's not. I suggest you just read the entire article first, before decidingif this is something you would like to try. Diabetic Test strips test for Glucose levels in the blood. Diabetics musttest their blood several times a day (as often as 3 to 6 X a day) withglucose Test Strips. But glucose test strips are very expensive, oftencosting up to $100 per box at retail! The diabetic test strip market oneBay helps diabetics save between 25% to 50% on their strips. There aremillions of diabetics who can only afford them this way. Before we get into the details, lets take a look at some completed auctionsfor this product. These are completed auctions. When you look at ongoing auctions you will see lower prices. Thats because the auctions havent ended yet. As you can see, Test Strips sell very well (over 15,000 completed sales inthe past 30 days). Sales average between $30 and $60, with some brands ofstrips reaching $100. So where do these sellers get their strips? This is a very interesting market: Thousands of diabetics, people withshort-term diabetes, and women with gestastational diabetes (diabetesassociated with pregnancy), are often sent strips through the mail by theirpharmacies. Once they no longer need them, the strips usually k Continue reading >>

Diabetic Test Strips Becoming Hot Commodity, But Are They Reliable?

Diabetic Test Strips Becoming Hot Commodity, But Are They Reliable?

Diabetic test strips becoming hot commodity, but are they reliable? Diabetic test strips becoming hot commodity, but are they reliable? RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) -- You've probably seen the roadside signs on just about every corner here in Central Virginia that read, "cash for diabetic test strips." It may seem like a get rich quick scheme, but cash for diabetic testing strips is a growing industry with signs, websites, Facebook posts and craigslist ads all offering quick quotes for your test strips. Cynthia Cupp, a Type 1 diabetic, told 8News that testing strips are a lifeline for her. Shesays the readings she get determines what she eats and what she can or can't do for the day. "I test my glucose levels 8 to 10 times a day," she explained."My life depends on them." Cupp's doctor monitors her recorded readings from those strips to adjust insulin and medication, so she's baffled by anyone selling their strips. "I need all of my strips, so I would not even consider selling them,'" Cupp said. 8News met another woman named Diesha who owns Simple Solutions At Home. She buys test strips here in Virginia and then resells them at a fraction of the retail cost. "I would pay up to 60 dollars for a box on 100 count Accu-check,"Diesha said. "I resell online and I also have regular buyers that are out of state." In Central Virginia alone, 8News found dozens of others like her offering anywhere from 10 to 65 bucks a box, depending on count and brand. "The reason that we do this is to help those who can't afford the health insurance," Dieshasaid. Katie Sundt, a registered dietician and certified diabetes educator with Bon Secours, says retail prices can be as much as one to $2 a strip. "Without a prescription they can be very pricey," she said. For example: That 100 count Accu-check box Continue reading >>

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much?

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much?

Have you looked at test strip prices and thought, “These should be made of gold?” Well, they are made of gold, along with other costly chemicals. But some cost 16 cents apiece; others cost $1 to $2. Why this range? What price is right? Spurred by some comments from DSM reader John C, I decided to research test strips, and they’re amazing. In fact, I will need two columns to explore them and the issues involved in their best use. To understand how test strips work, you would need to know quantum mechanics and electrochemistry (whatever that is), and I don’t. Here’s the part I could understand: Modern strips work by measuring the electrical energy in glucose in the blood. According to an article by Erika Gebel, PhD, in Diabetes Forecast, “Electrochemical test strips, the world standard today, employ enzymes…that convert glucose into an electrical current. That electricity…is read out by the meter as a glucose concentration.” It’s much faster than the old way, which was based on reading a color change, and requires much less blood. Apparently, working with enzymes is hard. “You want hydration around the enzyme to keep it active, but not too much because that will lead to degradation,” says Selly Saini, the worldwide director of strip products for Johnson & Johnson. “That’s a fine balance.” Because they use enzymes, strips are delicate. According to Dr. Gebel, exposure to humidity or temperature extremes can damage the enzymes, reducing accuracy. But “strip makers have partly tamed enzymes and increased their life span by incorporating chemicals that stabilize them.” So the colored patch at the end of the strip includes absorbents to soak up blood and enzymes to turn it into electricity and stabilizers to protect the enzymes. Then the elect Continue reading >>

9 Investigates: Companies Buy, Sell Diabetic Test Strips

9 Investigates: Companies Buy, Sell Diabetic Test Strips

9 Investigates: Companies buy, sell diabetic test strips By: Mark Becker 9 Investigates: Companies buy, sell diabetic test strips Some companies are buying and selling diabetic test strips. The selling of secondhand medical supplies is considered a "gray market." CHARLOTTE, N.C. --Lawton Hatley didn't know he had diabetes until it almost killed him. IMAGES: Signs requesting diabetic test strips Overnight I basically crashed and burned. My blood sugar shot up to 1,200. My kidneys were shriveling up. About 4 a.m., I begged for them to call an ambulance, Hatley said. He ended up in an emergency room in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina where he was barely able to communicate to a friend that he was probably having a diabetic attack, and doctors immediately started giving him insulin. Since that night, 13 years ago, tiny diabetic test strips have been his lifelines. He uses them four to six times a day to test his blood sugar levels and spends more than $1,500 a year to stay supplied with strips. So he was surprised and concerned when he saw signs along some Charlotte streets offering to pay cash for diabetic test strips. The signs have a telephone number and have popped up mostly in some of Charlottes poorer neighborhoods where people desperate for cash may be willing to part with their extra test strips. I don't know how anybody could manage their diabetes without test strips, he said. Then theres the question of someone profiting from the transaction. How are they cashing in on this? Because you're cashing in on someone's harm, basically, he asked. Doctor speaks on sale of diabetic test strips Its a view that others have taken of an industry that moves secondhand medical supplies through what some call a gray market. Diabetic test strips are extraordinarily expensive, Continue reading >>

The Murky World Of Secondhand Diabetic Test Strips

The Murky World Of Secondhand Diabetic Test Strips

Chelsea Arnold was getting into debt over tiny pieces of plastic: diabetic test strips. When Arnold was first diagnosed with diabetes she needed to test her blood sugar 10 times a day. She went to Wal-Mart and found that one box, which contained only a five-day supply of test strips, was $80. Arnold called her parents and told them she didn't know what to do. She didn't have the money. Arnold then did what a lot of people do when they need help: She searched on Google. She typed in the words "cheap test strips," and Craigslist came up. She bought eight boxes for less than $100. At Wal-Mart, she would have paid $640. Arnold said, "it was like having a life sentence and then realizing that there's a cure." With this Google search, Arnold stumbled into an underground economy for diabetic supplies. It's a market that offers a lower-cost option for test strips, though it is hard for customers to know where the boxes come from. Some boxes may be repackaged and unsafe to use, and some boxes are sold by diabetics who are desperate for cash. But many of them come from people who have health insurance and have accumulated extra test strips. Trey falls into this category. (He asked us not to use his last name, because he fears retribution from his insurance company, even though he feels he hasn't broken any laws.) He moved from one type of blood sugar monitoring system to another type of monitoring system and ended up with 20 extra test strip boxes. At that point, Trey began researching. He said, "Obviously No. 1: Is it legal to be able to sell test strips?" Trey realized that it is legal, with a caveat. "It's kind of a gray market as long as you don't get them from Medicare and Medicaid," he said. Trey then found a local buyer on Craigslist. It starts to look a little seedy here. Continue reading >>

When Do You Need A Prescription For Diabetic Test Strips?

When Do You Need A Prescription For Diabetic Test Strips?

When do you need a prescription for diabetic test strips? When Do You Need A Prescription for Diabetic Test Strips? Whether or not you need a prescription to purchase diabetic test strips depends on one thing. Read this article to find out how it all works. If youre one of the 29 million Americans living with diabetes, you likely have a lot of questions about how to get the medication you need.Were sure you also have questions about how you can keep the costs of supplies, test strips, lancets, and hospital visits down.Even if youre working out and taking care of yourself, you may feel like you cant do much to fight back against the rising costs of life with diabetes. In this post, well talk about whether or not you need a prescription to get diabetic test strips. Well also talk about how the cost of diabetes is different for the insured and the uninsured diabetes patient.No matter what your coverage is like, its always a smart idea to look for bargains, ways to save, and ways to make back some of the money youve spent ondiabetic test strips.Read this post to learn how to savebetter. The Costs Of Diabetes: Insured vs. Uninsured Theres no getting around it: life with diabetes is costly. In fact, recent figures show that the average yearly cost forone personliving with diabetes is about $13,700. Unfortunately, that same study showed that those without health insurance who are living with a diabetes diagnosis get 68% fewer prescriptions , and 79% fewer doctor visits , than those that are insured. Though most states have made sure insurance companies are required to cover medical costs and supplies, you still have to do a good amount of work to get certain things covered by your plan. You may even have to write them letters just to make back a small portion of what you spen Continue reading >>

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Maybe you've seen the "Diabetic Strips" signs on the side of the road in your state and also wondered what actually happens when you call one of the numbers listed... We wrote about organizations dealing in test strips cheap-for-cash in our post "Test Strip Charities" last year, but without the extra bonus of having an undercover "secret shopper" to check the service out. Now our talented cartoonist, D-Advocate and correspondent Mike Lawson offered to make that happen by following up on one of these surprising road-side signs. Read on to discover what Mike found out! Special to the 'Mine by Mr. Mike Lawson I felt like Woodward. No...I felt like Bernstein. Wait. Which one did Robert Redford play in All The President's Men? That's the one I felt like. I was sitting in a McDonald's parking lot in Scottsdale, Arizona, waiting for a man named Marcus to meet me so I could sell a box of 50 test strips. I arranged this meeting by calling a phone number that I saw on a road-side sign in Phoenix that said "Ca$h Paid For Diabetic Strips." It is not illegal for companies to buy and sell test strips like this — although the companies are required to register with the FDA and many fail to do so — yet this transaction still felt a little shady. When I called the number, for example, I wasn't greeted with a company name but just by a woman who identified herself as "Stephanie." Stephanie told me that there was no physical building for me to drop off the strips, but rather a courier would be sent to me. Stephanie also told me that the price paid for strips varied based on the brand and the expiration date. So I could sell this box of One Touch strips that I purchased for $10 on my private insurance to this unnamed company for $20. And this same box of strips will sell for $40 or mor Continue reading >>

Signs Solicit Diabetic Test Strips For Cash

Signs Solicit Diabetic Test Strips For Cash

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) – They say there’s a market for everything. You may have seen some signs around town that say “Ca$h for diabetic test strips” or “I traded my diabetic strips for cash.” Andrea Caldwell was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in January of 2016. “The doctor tells me to check at least three times a day,” Caldwell said. Checking her blood sugar level is mandatory. It’s a crucial monitoring step that happens multiple times a day for most diabetic patients. “If you don’t check your numbers, you risk your numbers going high and you can go into a stroke, a heart attack,” Caldwell said. She uses a meter and testing strips that come in a box. She said the strips can get costly. “With insurance it’s $25,” Caldwell said. Without insurance, a monthly supply can run someone thousands of dollars each year for a lifetime. So what if we told you there was some sort of unauthorized market for these strips? There are signs in several places around Louisville soliciting people to sell their testing strips for cash. >> More Health News from WAVE3.com The signs are handmade with a sharpie and cardboard and can be seen tacked onto street lights. They also come in the form of bus shelter advertisements. Pharmacist Rebecca Fletcher said the signs create a reason for concern. “For patients who may have an excess, it’s usually those who might not be compliant,” Fletcher said. “If you are selling your strips, it means you’re not checking your numbers, it means you’re not taking care of yourself,” Caldwell said. Caldwell also said she always runs out of strips near her refill time. To ration her strips out, she has to sometimes cut down testing from three times a day to twice. On top of that, both the Food and Drug Administration and the Continue reading >>

Can I Buy Glucose Test Strips Over The Counter?

Can I Buy Glucose Test Strips Over The Counter?

Yes, you can purchase as many blood glucose test strips as you want over the counter at your local pharmacy or online. You may find that local pharmacies keep their test strips behind the counter. That’s is not because a prescription is required for test strips but rather to keep the test strips from people stealing them because they are so expensive. Do I Need A Prescription to Buy Glucose Test Strip? We often get this question about all diabetic supplies not just the test strips, and the answer is always the same: No, you’re not required to have a prescription to buy glucose test strips. If for whatever reason you need buy diabetic tests strips you can do so by ordering them online or purchasing them at your local pharmacy. Just keep in mind that they are so expensive at your local pharmacy. Does Insurance Require Prescription to Cover My Test Strips? The answer to this question depends on your insurance. Generally, there are three possible scenarios: Your insurance requires a prescription to cover your test strips. In that case you will need to have your doctor write you a prescription to get coverage for your test strips. Otherwise, you can buy them without prescription but you would have to pay out of your pocket. You may have to launch a letter-writing campaign to your insurance to see if they will reimburse you for the over the counter purchase of test strips. There are other insurances that don’t require prescriptions. All they will need from you is the invoice. Simply Submit your invoice to them for reimbursement. These are commonly referred to as Good insurance. Lastly, if you’re on Medicare or Medicaid, you will need to have a prescription to get covered. You can check online to see if there are any government programs that will reimburse you for diab Continue reading >>

Secondary Market Arises For Diabetes Test Strips

Secondary Market Arises For Diabetes Test Strips

Five words in a recent classified ad revealed that a secondary market for lower-priced diabetes test strips is reaching into the greater Pittsburgh area. “I Buy Diabetic Test Strips!” the ad in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette declared, with an 800-number and requirements that boxes be unopened and strips be unexpired. The secondary purchase and resale of test strips, typically advertised through Craigslist, is centered for now in Michigan, with several ads showing up in eastern West Virginia and western Maryland. With retail prices for test strips as high as $1.79 each, the so-called black or gray market finds people selling excess strips to buyers, who in turn resell them at sizable discounts. People with diabetes use these strips to test blood glucose levels, with those on insulin sometimes using 10 strips or more daily to manage their disease. Physicians, medical insurance providers and test-strip manufacturers warn about potential health risks from false readings from off-market strips damaged by heat or humidity, among other problems. “Products obtained from sources not authorized by LifeScan have been found to be counterfeit, stored or transported improperly, tampered with, stolen, associated with insurance fraud, illegally diverted or otherwise illegally obtained,” states LifeScan, the manufacturer of OneTouch test strips, the leading national brand. “LifeScan does not sell products through Amazon, eBay, or other online sources such as Facebook or Craigslist.” Strip search Several news reports have addressed the off-market sale of test strips. Some involve reporters spotting a buyer through Craigslist or other sites, with the exchange occurring in a fast-food restaurant parking lot, raising the specter of a black-market operation that begs the question of Continue reading >>

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