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Where To Buy Diabetic Chocolate

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Are you a chocolate lover? And more importantly are you a diabetic on the lookout for your best chocolate options? I tend to make my own chocolate (and we have quite a few recipes for that), but I know most people aren't as motivated as me and prefer to buy something prepackaged. So to save you time and energy I went on a search for some ‘healthy' diabetic chocolate brands, ones I thought stood out of the crowd. When I did my search I was looking for ones low in carbs and preferably sugar free and made with stevia (my preferred natural sweetener). So I came up with a few good contenders for you to choose from and have gathered all the info below so you can make your own comparisons. 1. Dante's Confection This brand is a very popular top seller on Amazon, and I like it because it only contains 3 ingredients! Any ‘product' that has 5 or less ingredients, with ingredients we can recognize, gets the T2DT seal of approval It's also low in carbs and is excellent value for money. Another reason this one is the chocolate of choice is because it is the lowest in total carbs as well. Ingredients: Organic Fair-Trade Cocoa, Stevia, Natural Vanilla. Nutrition – Serving size: 45 g (1 bar) Calories: 260 Fat: 24 g Carbs: 12 g Fiber: 7 g Sugars: 0 g Net carbs: 5 g Protein: 7 g Cost: $16.99 for 4 x 45 g (1.5 oz) bars and many people say that eating just half a bar is all you need to feel satisfied. Check Out Dante's Confection on Amazon Here 2. Lily's Sweets Lily's Sweets has a variety of chocolate blends to choose from, dark chocolate, dark chocolate almond, milk chocolate, milk chocolate almond and more. These are sweetened with stevia and erythritol and have lots of good reviews on Amazon. They do contain a few more ingredients but some of their flavors might be worth exploring. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chocolate

Diabetes And Chocolate

Tweet A diabetic eating chocolate may raise eyebrows amongst some people but within reason, chocolate needn’t be completely cut out of your diet. In most cases, chocolate will cause blood sugar levels to rise and in light of this it’s best to limit chocolate consumption to small amounts and to avoid eating when blood sugars are already higher than the recommended blood glucose levels. Is eating chocolate good or bad for you? Chocolate contains a number of beneficial nutrients, some of which called flavonoids are thought to guard against heart disease. However, it should be noted that larger quantities of chocolate can be disadvantageous to health in other ways. If a larger amount of chocolate is consumed, it will raise blood sugars which increases the risk of complications, of which cardiovascular problems is one. Secondly, the calorific content of chocolate is relatively high and therefore overconsumption of chocolate could lead to weight gain which also raises the risk of heart problems. How much chocolate should I eat? For most people with diabetes, chocolate is best restricted to a few squares to prevent too much of an increase in sugar levels. For people with diabetes without weight problems, chocolate can be appropriate to have before exercising. For more strenuous activity, however, even shorter acting carbohydrate may be required. Which chocolate is best for me? Chocolate with higher amounts of cocoa solids are best, as the sugar and fat content will often be lower as a result. For high cocoa solids content, dark chocolate is usually a good pick. Is diabetic chocolate better for my sugar levels? Generally speaking, diabetic chocolate is made by replacing some or all of the sugar content with an alternative source of sweetener, such as the polyols (sugar alco Continue reading >>

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Ice cream does not have to be strictly off limits for people with type 2 diabetes. While it is still best to enjoy ice cream in moderation, there are ice cream and frozen yogurt choices out there that will not derail a healthful diet. People with type 2 diabetes have more to think about than simply ruining their diet with ice cream. Their main concerns are about how ice cream will affect their blood sugar levels, since controlling this is critical to managing diabetes. While people with diabetes can include ice cream as part of their healthful diet, it is important for them to make informed decisions about what ice creams they should eat. Understanding ice cream sugar servings Most ice cream has a lot of added sugar, making it something a person with diabetes should avoid. Because of this, one of the first things they should consider when choosing an ice cream is the sugar content. People with diabetes need to understand how their ice cream indulgence fits into their overall diet plan. Here are a few facts for people with diabetes to consider: Every 4 grams (g) of sugar is equivalent to 1 teaspoon. The more sugar that is in the ice cream, the more carbohydrates it has. An ice cream serving with 15 g of carbohydrates is equal to 1 serving of carbohydrates. Any carbohydrates in ice cream will count towards the total carbohydrate goal for the day, which will be different for each person. Protein and fat found in ice cream can help slow absorption of sugar. Choosing an ice cream higher in protein and fat may be preferable to choosing a lower fat option. A suitable portion of ice cream for somebody with diabetes is very small, usually half a cup. But most people serve much more than this. It is crucial that a person with diabetes sticks to the proper portion size, so they kn Continue reading >>

Diabetic Chocolate. - Page 4

Diabetic Chocolate. - Page 4

I'd also suggest that you test later than 1 hours and even later than 2 hours. The high fat content of chocolate often makes your BG peak later. It's like pizza, while you may be ok at 1 hour you'll get the really high BG at 3 hours or later since it's slower to digest. realy???? fatty foods will do that? Friend Pre-D probably T2. no meds yet, diet and exercise. Yeah, I have had a few chocolates since my Dx. I'm usually fine with JELLO but we all have a craving once in a while. I buy this stuff called Valor Dark Chocolate with Almonds, 70% cocoa. I have a square of that stuff once in a while. I still have the original bar I bought 4 months ago.... I guess I don't have it as often as some. It's odd and probably bad for my teeth but when I have it, I break the little square in half and suck on it until it melts away. I guess it makes it feel like I stretched it out. I also bought a tin of these dark chocolate truffles and have them in the drawer of my office. I thought I might get a craving at work one day and I really can't sneak out of my work place. I still haven't opened it and it's been 3 weeks. I guess my sweet tooth has rotted away a little. I was really hoping the carb count on those dark chocolate M and Ms would be lower but..... alas it isn't. My favorite snack on the face of the planet was Peanut M and Ms. I would buy a bag and take them to football games all the time. American football for all you UK folks... I have noticed if says dark chocolate but does not have a percentage of cocoa on the front it's probably not really dark chocolate, or probably just borders on the edge of what dark chocolate is. I have not had diabetic chocolates I just have dark chocolate. I have changed my view on how I eat now a days. I figure if I'm going to eat something that is no Continue reading >>

Boots Diabetic Chocolate

Boots Diabetic Chocolate

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Wife bought me a bar of this,I know we are told to avoid "diabetic" food products but she loves me etc.so I ate some earlier now it did warn of possible laxitive effect but the flatulance produced I could of flown a kite,very embarising be warned Lethal stuff!!Should have a government health warning on it!! :lol: :lol: I noticed that Boots had started selling "Diabetic Chocolate" they used to sell quite a range of stuff when I was a kid. My grandparents and well meaning relatives used to buy loads of stuff for me and my brother (we were both diagnosed type 1 back in the 70s). Everyone used to think (including us at the time) that because it was labelled "diabetic", we could eat it freely. This wasn't (and of course still isn't) the case. Boots stopped selling the products for quite a few years. I was very disappointed to see they had started selling it again :x . Of course I realise that this is my personal opinion and some people may not share that opinion, I just worry about those who may be misled, especially young or people inexperienced with diabetes (as we were 30 years ago). Wow i feel bad that diabetics get the short straw when it comes to the sweet stuff i.e. chocolate but i come here with good news i have found a chocolate that diabetics can eat and can be very good for you in so many ways i would not say this if it was not true here is more info below. Xoai products are produced with cacao that is unfermented, sun-dried, non-roasted, non-alkalized, non-lecithinized, and cold-pressed. Because these processes are closely monitored, Xoai delivers the optimum amount of the antioxidants naturally found in Xoai products are the perfect delivery s Continue reading >>

Dark Chocolate And Diabetes: The Benefits Of This Tasty Snack

Dark Chocolate And Diabetes: The Benefits Of This Tasty Snack

Hardly a day goes by without a media source advising us to "Eat a tomato each day for better skin," "have a glass of red wine each night with dinner" — or some other dietary directive. Perhaps you've heard about the potential health benefits of dark chocolate and diabetes. But is it true? Chocolate fans, rejoice! Yes, in fact, this snack could lower your diabetes risk according to Endocrine Abstracts. Daily consumption of dark chocolate is associated with positive effects on insulin sensitivity and blood sugar — two key factors in developing diabetes. But before you jump and start incorporating chocolate into meals, make sure you know the facts. The Link Between Dark Chocolate and Diabetes The secret of how dark chocolate works against diabetes lies within the sweet snack's makeup. Dark chocolate contains polyphenols, which are naturally occurring compounds that have antioxidant properties (which protect the body from damage caused by harmful molecules). Polyphenols in dark chocolate may improve insulin sensitivity, or how well insulin works in the body. This, in turn, may help control blood sugar, according to research published in Endocrine Abstracts. Such improved insulin sensitivity may delay, or even prevent, the onset of diabetes. A study published by the journal Appetite found that people who eat chocolate, including dark chocolate, at least once a week had a lower prevalence of diabetes and were at lower risk for diabetes four to five years later. The analysis of 908 nondiabetic people and 45 people with diabetes discovered that people who ate such chocolate less than once weekly were at twice the risk of diabetes versus those who ate it more than one day per week. But what if you already have diabetes? Well, there may be some benefits of dark chocolate cons Continue reading >>

Sugar Free/low Carbs | Schakolad Chocolate Factory

Sugar Free/low Carbs | Schakolad Chocolate Factory

* Online Price Only. If you are planning on purchasing directly from a local Schakolad Store, please be aware that Store pricing may vary from Online Pricing. We experienced Schakolad Chocolate this past weekend in Columbus. We were very surprised! Great chocolate and great concept. ... Thank you for having such wonderful chocolates. My husband is a dark chocolate fan and he has been very pleased with everything ... I felt compelled to drop you a line to let you know that I just sampled my "schakolads" that WGGB-News 40was kind ... I wanted to let you know that the truffles were a BIG hit at the dinner. One of the groomsmen was facing us ... Your chocolate is wonderful! I enjoy the service I receive when I come in. You don't try to rush me and it's hard in this ... I wanted to send you a quick email message to THANK YOU for the fabulous Schakolad chocolates that really added the finishing ... Carolyn R. - Kronos, Inc. - Massachussetts I would like to say that I am very impressed in the timely fashion that I received my truffles. I think I placed my order ... I totally love your store and all the people in it! The franchise owners in San Antonio are wonderful. They have worked with me to create great gifts that have been throughly ... I went back into the store on 2/16/06. This is some of the best candy that I have tasted. Ilike the way you personalize each purchase for me! You make the best chocolate covered strawberries I have ever had. Keep up the good work. Thank you for the second shipment. It arrived as promised and my wife enjoyed them immensely. You have now officially ... Love your chocolate and the rewards program! Thank you I absolutely love theSchakolad store. Especially the dark chocolate. I intend to be a loyal customer for a long time. Thanks!!... Delicio Continue reading >>

Sugar-free Chocolate Pecan Fudge

Sugar-free Chocolate Pecan Fudge

When chocolate fudge is this rich, soft and dense, it's hard to believe it's sugar freebut it is. Blending it with pecans adds a delightful hint of flavor and texture to this scrumptious treat. These Sugar-free Products are intended for use by those who wish to restrict their intake of sugars and are not reduced calorie foods. If you have any doubts as to whether or not this product may be restricted from your diet, you should always consult your physician. Consume in moderation. Please refer to product guide. Bought this item during Christmas. I believe it made me sick. I would not purchase again. Very good and will probably buy this again. Both of my parents had diabetes and I have a sibling who suffers. So sadly, I cannot enjoy the many wonderful sweet treats out there at Christmas time or whenever. This fudge was DELICIOUS, I felt like I was eating regular food! Thank you for making such wonderful sugar free treats! Diabetic issues and this fudge, in moderation, is delicious! I will purchase this again as well as your other no sugar options. Continue reading >>

No Sugar Added | Callebaut

No Sugar Added | Callebaut

Callebaut offers a great chocolate alternative for your customers who are into solid cocoa and chocolate flavour, yet at the same time want to avoid sugar. This stevia chocolate is a real power bomb with about 86% cocoa solids. The pleasant hints of sweetness in taste come from the stevia plant. Moreover, this chocolate has a very pleasant mouth feel thanks to the dietary fibre that replaces sugar. Stevia chocolate is at its best for flavouring ganaches, pastry mousses, crmes and desserts like ice cream. It also gives drinks a solid chocolate boost, without the sugar. Stevia chocolate enables you to promote your finished products with labels such as 'no added sugar', 'sweetened by stevia' or 'made with chocolate without added sugar'. Contact your local Callebaut representative for more information about the criteria for applying this labelling. With this chocolate, you support cocoa farmers The Finest Belgian Chocolate needs the finest cocoa beans. Today and tomorrow. For every pack of Finest Belgian Chocolate you buy, we reinvest a part in sustainable cocoa farming through the Cocoa Horizons Foundation. Continue reading >>

So Good...it's Unbelievably Sugar Free!

So Good...it's Unbelievably Sugar Free!

The secret to our incredibly good diabetic chocolate is...well, it’s a secret. No, not really, but it is simple. We use only the finest quality natural ingredients from exotic places like Africa, South America, and Belgium. There are no fillers, preservatives, or substitute oils. And an important part of our award-winning diabetic chocolate recipe is the sweetener. Maltitol is the sweetener used in Amber Lyn diabetic chocolate. It is a reduced calorie and reduced carbohydrate sweetener that has 90% the sweetness of sugar. Maltitol is a member of a family of sweeteners known as sugar alcohols or polyols. Most of the Maltitol used to sweeten other diabetic chocolate is derived from corn, but ours comes from wheat. Our observation is that wheat based Maltitol may reduce the mild laxative effect that is sometimes experienced after excessive consumption. And, it’s gluten-free. While Amber Lyn chocolate confections have proven a godsend for diabetics and others who must limit their intake of carbohydrates, it’s not just for diabetics. Our diabetic chocolate is the perfect chocolate for anyone who loves chocolate but wants a healthier lifestyle. Amber Lyn products are much more than diabetic chocolate and we guarantee you won’t be able to tell that it has had no sugar added. Continue reading >>

Dark Chocolate & Diabetes

Dark Chocolate & Diabetes

Dark chocolate is different from milk chocolate. It isn't just the color or the taste. Dark chocolate is chemically different from milk chocolate, because it doesn't contain milk solids and usually doesn't have a high percentage of sugar. Because of the low sugar content, dark chocolate doesn't spike blood sugar the way other sweets and candies do, making it an acceptable as an occasional sweet for the diabetic. Video of the Day Diabetes is a chronic disease that is marked by high levels of sugar in the bloodstream, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas, is used to usher glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be burned for energy. When you have diabetes your body produces too little insulin or none at all or doesn't use it correctly. This increases the amount of sugar or glucose in the bloodstream, which can lead to hypertension, stroke, heart attack, loss of eyesight, kidney damage and peripheral vascular disease. The good news for chocolate fans is that dark chocolate has been linked to improved insulin sensitivity and reduced resistance. A study published in 2005 in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" found that dark chocolate improved insulin sensitivity in healthy study participants. The authors recommended larger studies to confirm this finding. The improvement in insulin sensitivity may help prevent the onset of diabetes, but you must also eat dark chocolate that has not undergone processing that removes the flavanoids or overeat dark chocolate, which can increase your caloric intake and lead to weight gain. Scientists presented a review of 21 studies at the conference of the American Heart Association in 2011. They linked improved health of blood vessels and levels of good cho Continue reading >>

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

I used to say chocolate tasted great, but if you thought it was a health food, you were kidding yourself. But research shows that chocolate helps manage diabetes, prevents heart disease, and improves mood. Is this too good to be true? Next week, I’ll get back to toxic chemicals. This week, I felt like something tastier. According to nutritionist Amy Campbell, chocolate is made from cacao (cocoa) beans. The insides of the roasted beans, or the “nibs,” are crushed into a paste. So right there is a good start. We’ve written before about the diabetes benefits of beans, so chocolate has a good pedigree for health. Most of chocolate’s healing power seems to come from “flavonoids,” biological chemicals that Campbell says “are thought to help lower cholesterol and lower the risk of blood clots.” Other studies show chocolate can relax blood vessels; lower blood pressure, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and blood glucose; and improve insulin function. Unfortunately, pure chocolate is bitter. You have to add sugar to make it taste good. And pure chocolate is powdery and dry. You have to add an emulsifier, like fat, to give it an enjoyable texture. So authorities have long called chocolate harmful and told people, especially people with diabetes, to avoid it. Is there a way to get the benefits, minimize the harmful sugars and fats, and still have something you want to eat? The healing flavonoids and flavonols are in the dark part of the chocolate. About.com guide Elizabeth LaBau defines “dark chocolate” as “chocolate without milk solids added…The cocoa content of commercial dark chocolate bars can range from 30%… to 70%… or even above 80% for extremely dark bars. Common terms used to distinguish the cocoa content of dark chocolate bars [from bitterest to Continue reading >>

Sugar Free Chocolate Recipe Made With Stevia

Sugar Free Chocolate Recipe Made With Stevia

This post may be sponsored or contain affiliate links. We may earn money from purchases made through links mentioned in this post, but all opinions are our own. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliates sites. A sugar free chocolate recipe made with stevia. It contains no added sugar alcohol. It uses natural sweeteners along with cocoa butter and unsweetened cocoa. Although I have another recipe for homemade low carb chocolate bars made with stevia that I’ve used for several years, this new recipe has about the same net carbs. But is also has much more fiber. I omitted the need for an unsweetened chocolate bar and used unsweetened cocoa with additional cocoa butter instead. And, this new sugar free chocolate recipe with stevia has no added sugar alcohol. There are some folks who are sensitive to all sugar alcohols, including erythritol, so it’s nice to have some options for them. I find that stevia by itself does not taste as good as when it is mixed with another low carb sweetener. That’s why most stevia sold is blended with the sugar alcohol erythritol. Stevia is also much easier to measure and use as a sugar replacement when bulked up with another sweetener like erythritol. However, I find that erythritol often forms insoluble crystals in chocolate that can make a chocolate bar texture crunchy when it should be smooth and silky. My new sweetener of choice to blend with stevia for my sugar free chocolate recipe is VitaFiber powder or inulin. Neither of these will form crystals like erythritol so the chocolate remains smooth as it should be. I discovered VitaFiber while reading the Low Carb Friends Forum and decided to Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Chocolate For Diabetes

The Benefits Of Chocolate For Diabetes

Ohhhhhhhhhh….Chocolate! Chocolate! How many times have you just had that sometimes nearly overwhelming urge to have some chocolate—in any form! You can have a chocolate bar, chocolate milk, chocolate cake, brownies, a chocolate ice cream sundae or a cup of hot cocoa just to list a few forms of chocolate. Oh wait—you can have dark chocolate, milk chocolate, orange, mint or raspberry-flavored chocolate or white chocolate….so much to choose from! But….should you? And if you should, just how much is enough and how much is overdoing it? Are there “healthier” forms of chocolate? Many of us sure as shootin’ hope there is! The “Dark” History of Chocolate Chocolate comes from the fruit and seeds of the cacao tree and is native to the Amazon forest. Botanically, the cacao tree is known as Theobroma cacao – this tree has three major varieties; the Forastero, the Trinitario and the Criollo. The Forastero is the most commonly used variety while the rarest and most prized for its aroma and its delicate taste is the Criollo variety. Christopher Columbus is credited with being the first European to come in contact with the cacao bean—he and his crew found—and stole, apparently—a canoe filled with various food items, including baskets of cacao beans. The cacao beans were actually used as local currency, but their chocolate quality was missed for another twenty years until Hernando Cortez brought 3 chests of cacao beans, this time stolen from the Aztecs, back to the court of the Spanish king—and the popularity of cacao and chocolate took off![1] The history of chocolate though, actually appears to be much older, going back to at least the Mayan civilization and possibly the Olmec civilization that predates the Mayan civilization. The traditional chocolate be Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

If you have diabetes, you can eat anything -- although possibly not in the quantities you'd like. That includes chocolate. Some types of chocolate, such as dark chocolate, might even have health benefits, in moderation. Portion control is the key to enjoying foods like chocolate if you have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association reports. Dark chocolate is rich in polyphenols, plant substances that act as antioxidants and that might also help prevent heart disease and lower blood glucose levels. Types of Chocolate All chocolate is not created equal in terms of health benefits. When it comes to foods high in simple sugars, less is better if you have diabetes. Dark chocolate contains more cocoa and less sugar than milk chocolate, so you can eat a little more of it if you're controlling your calories or sugar intake. With dark chocolate, the higher the cocoa percentage, the better it is for you. Look for dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cocoa, registered dietitian Mitzi Dulan recommends. White chocolate contains no cocoa and is higher in calories and saturated fat than dark or milk chocolate. Potential Benefits According to a study that appeared in the January, 2015 issue of ARYA Atherosclerosis, high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate lowers blood pressure and insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. Insulin resistance restricts the uptake of glucose into cells, which causes blood glucose levels to rise. People who ate white chocolate did not experience a decrease in blood pressure or insulin resistance. In a British study published in the November 2010 issue of Diabetic Medicine, diabetics who consumed chocolate high in cocoa for 16 weeks experienced a decrease in total cholesterol and an increase in high-density lipoprotein, the so-c Continue reading >>

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