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Where To Buy Chocolate For Diabetics

Dark Chocolate & Diabetes

Dark Chocolate & Diabetes

Dark chocolate is different from milk chocolate. It isn't just the color or the taste. Dark chocolate is chemically different from milk chocolate, because it doesn't contain milk solids and usually doesn't have a high percentage of sugar. Because of the low sugar content, dark chocolate doesn't spike blood sugar the way other sweets and candies do, making it an acceptable as an occasional sweet for the diabetic. Video of the Day Diabetes is a chronic disease that is marked by high levels of sugar in the bloodstream, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas, is used to usher glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be burned for energy. When you have diabetes your body produces too little insulin or none at all or doesn't use it correctly. This increases the amount of sugar or glucose in the bloodstream, which can lead to hypertension, stroke, heart attack, loss of eyesight, kidney damage and peripheral vascular disease. The good news for chocolate fans is that dark chocolate has been linked to improved insulin sensitivity and reduced resistance. A study published in 2005 in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" found that dark chocolate improved insulin sensitivity in healthy study participants. The authors recommended larger studies to confirm this finding. The improvement in insulin sensitivity may help prevent the onset of diabetes, but you must also eat dark chocolate that has not undergone processing that removes the flavanoids or overeat dark chocolate, which can increase your caloric intake and lead to weight gain. Scientists presented a review of 21 studies at the conference of the American Heart Association in 2011. They linked improved health of blood vessels and levels of good cho Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chocolate

Diabetes And Chocolate

Tweet A diabetic eating chocolate may raise eyebrows amongst some people but within reason, chocolate needn’t be completely cut out of your diet. In most cases, chocolate will cause blood sugar levels to rise and in light of this it’s best to limit chocolate consumption to small amounts and to avoid eating when blood sugars are already higher than the recommended blood glucose levels. Is eating chocolate good or bad for you? Chocolate contains a number of beneficial nutrients, some of which called flavonoids are thought to guard against heart disease. However, it should be noted that larger quantities of chocolate can be disadvantageous to health in other ways. If a larger amount of chocolate is consumed, it will raise blood sugars which increases the risk of complications, of which cardiovascular problems is one. Secondly, the calorific content of chocolate is relatively high and therefore overconsumption of chocolate could lead to weight gain which also raises the risk of heart problems. How much chocolate should I eat? For most people with diabetes, chocolate is best restricted to a few squares to prevent too much of an increase in sugar levels. For people with diabetes without weight problems, chocolate can be appropriate to have before exercising. For more strenuous activity, however, even shorter acting carbohydrate may be required. Which chocolate is best for me? Chocolate with higher amounts of cocoa solids are best, as the sugar and fat content will often be lower as a result. For high cocoa solids content, dark chocolate is usually a good pick. Is diabetic chocolate better for my sugar levels? Generally speaking, diabetic chocolate is made by replacing some or all of the sugar content with an alternative source of sweetener, such as the polyols (sugar alco Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

Can Diabetics Eat Chocolate?

If you have diabetes, you can eat anything -- although possibly not in the quantities you'd like. That includes chocolate. Some types of chocolate, such as dark chocolate, might even have health benefits, in moderation. Portion control is the key to enjoying foods like chocolate if you have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association reports. Dark chocolate is rich in polyphenols, plant substances that act as antioxidants and that might also help prevent heart disease and lower blood glucose levels. Types of Chocolate All chocolate is not created equal in terms of health benefits. When it comes to foods high in simple sugars, less is better if you have diabetes. Dark chocolate contains more cocoa and less sugar than milk chocolate, so you can eat a little more of it if you're controlling your calories or sugar intake. With dark chocolate, the higher the cocoa percentage, the better it is for you. Look for dark chocolate with at least 70 percent cocoa, registered dietitian Mitzi Dulan recommends. White chocolate contains no cocoa and is higher in calories and saturated fat than dark or milk chocolate. Potential Benefits According to a study that appeared in the January, 2015 issue of ARYA Atherosclerosis, high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate lowers blood pressure and insulin resistance in patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. Insulin resistance restricts the uptake of glucose into cells, which causes blood glucose levels to rise. People who ate white chocolate did not experience a decrease in blood pressure or insulin resistance. In a British study published in the November 2010 issue of Diabetic Medicine, diabetics who consumed chocolate high in cocoa for 16 weeks experienced a decrease in total cholesterol and an increase in high-density lipoprotein, the so-c Continue reading >>

The Dieter’s (and Diabetic Person's) Guide To Buying Chocolate

The Dieter’s (and Diabetic Person's) Guide To Buying Chocolate

How can you get your daily chocolate fix -- and eat less sugar or calories, too? That's a million-dollar question that several companies are banking on people asking. Over the past few years, the sugar-free and portion-controlled chocolate market has exploded. There are all sorts of sugar-free versions of favorite chocolate bars. And you can now buy individually wrapped chocolate bars or sticks in 60- to 100-calorie portions, along with the ever-popular kisses. To help you decide among all the options out there, we taste-tested a number of sugar-free chocolate products (and some portion-controlled ones, too). But first, let's talk about how having a little chocolate every day could actually be good for you. Can Chocolate Really Be Good For You? Yes, it's true -- chocolate does appear to have some health benefits. Though more research needs to be done, studies have indicated that cocoa and darker types of chocolate may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, decrease blood pressure, and relax blood vessels. Many of the health benefits of chocolate seem to stem from the antioxidant flavanols (a type of flavonoid), which are also found in other plant foods including tea, grapes, grapefruit, and wine. The cocoa bean happens to be extraordinarily rich in them. The flavanol content of chocolate depends on the flavanol content of the cacao plant used, and the way the cocoa was turned into chocolate. But here are three general rules of thumb: Cocoa powder and baking chocolate contain more flavonoids than dark chocolate. Dark chocolate has more flavonoids than milk chocolate. White chocolate has none. Of course, there's a catch to all this -- you don't want to cancel out all these potential health benefits of dark chocolate and cocoa by eating too many calories or too mu Continue reading >>

My Love Of Chocolate And My Diabetes

My Love Of Chocolate And My Diabetes

One of my favorite things to eat is chocolate. As a diabetic, I set out to find if eating chocolate was a treat I needed to give up. Not only did I look into it, but I was very surprised at what I found. In fact, I ended up creating my own line of sugar-free chocolate. One of my favorite things to eat is chocolate. As a diabetic, I set out to find if eating chocolate was a treat I needed to give up. Not only did I look into it, but I was very surprised at what I found. In fact, I ended up creating my own line of sugar-free chocolate. There are over 350 million people suffering from diabetes. One of the most frequently asked questions regarding diabetes and diet is whether diabetics must give up chocolate and other candy treats for good. The good news, however, is that those suffering from diabetes can enjoy an occasional chocolate treat if they exercise restraint and moderation. And with many new products on the market that are sugar-free, it makes it that much easier to have a treat every now and then. One of the reasons that an occasional chocolate bar is okay for diabetics is the fact that the sugar in chocolate is absorbed more slowly than that found in many other foods, such as white bread and even mashed potatoes. This means that the body has a bit more time to deal with the rise in blood sugar caused by chocolate. It is important to keep in mind, however, that too much chocolate can lead to excess weight gain that could complicate ones diabetes. Many diabetics wonder about the special chocolates made with diabetics in mind. Like any other type of food, these diabetic chocolates can be either good or bad, depending on how they are consumed. When eaten as part of an overall healthy diet, diabetic chocolate can be an awesome treat, but when consumed in excess, it c Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Chocolate With Gestational Diabetes?

Can You Eat Chocolate With Gestational Diabetes?

Chocolate is a sweet treat that has added refined sugar and so many ladies may prefer not to push the boundaries and choose not to eat chocolate with gestational diabetes. Too much, or the wrong kind of chocolate can easily spike blood sugar levels too high. However, for many it is an extremely hard thing to avoid and a small amount of the right kind of chocolate, paired well can be a safer small sweet treat that keeps blood sugar levels at safe levels. Due to the fat in chocolate it means the glucose from it releases slower than some other sweets and sugary treats and it is for this reason that chocolate is no longer recommended to be used to raise blood sugar levels when insulin dependant diabetics are having hypos. If you are a chocoholic who feels they will not be able to control the amounts eaten, then you may want to make the choice to abstain completely, or only buy chocolate in treat size amounts to prevent overindulging. Chocolate can be eaten as a treat with gestational diabetes but here are a few tips to make it more tolerable: Control of levels - Only have chocolate treats if you have control of your blood sugar levels. If you are seeing erratic levels (high and/or low), then leave treats until you have gained better control first. Snack - Eat it as a 'snack', rather than straight after a meal so that you don't over eat too many carbohydrates at one time OR if eating straight after a meal bear this additional carb amount in mind! Quantity - Eat only small amounts of chocolate. If you struggle to be restrained with eating chocolate then purchase treat size individual bars so that you don't overindulge e.g. a Cadbury's Freddo which is 18g in weight and 10g total carbs, or the Green & Black's 35g 70% dark chocolate minature bars, or treat size chocolate buttons Continue reading >>

Dark Chocolate And Diabetes: The Benefits Of This Tasty Snack

Dark Chocolate And Diabetes: The Benefits Of This Tasty Snack

Hardly a day goes by without a media source advising us to "Eat a tomato each day for better skin," "have a glass of red wine each night with dinner" — or some other dietary directive. Perhaps you've heard about the potential health benefits of dark chocolate and diabetes. But is it true? Chocolate fans, rejoice! Yes, in fact, this snack could lower your diabetes risk according to Endocrine Abstracts. Daily consumption of dark chocolate is associated with positive effects on insulin sensitivity and blood sugar — two key factors in developing diabetes. But before you jump and start incorporating chocolate into meals, make sure you know the facts. The Link Between Dark Chocolate and Diabetes The secret of how dark chocolate works against diabetes lies within the sweet snack's makeup. Dark chocolate contains polyphenols, which are naturally occurring compounds that have antioxidant properties (which protect the body from damage caused by harmful molecules). Polyphenols in dark chocolate may improve insulin sensitivity, or how well insulin works in the body. This, in turn, may help control blood sugar, according to research published in Endocrine Abstracts. Such improved insulin sensitivity may delay, or even prevent, the onset of diabetes. A study published by the journal Appetite found that people who eat chocolate, including dark chocolate, at least once a week had a lower prevalence of diabetes and were at lower risk for diabetes four to five years later. The analysis of 908 nondiabetic people and 45 people with diabetes discovered that people who ate such chocolate less than once weekly were at twice the risk of diabetes versus those who ate it more than one day per week. But what if you already have diabetes? Well, there may be some benefits of dark chocolate cons Continue reading >>

Diabetic Chocolate | Ebay

Diabetic Chocolate | Ebay

Contains natural occurring sugars. Currently not available. BELGIAN NO ADDED SUGARS MILK CHOCOLATE SWEETENED WITH MALTITOL. THESE SUPERB ALL NEW SUGAR FREE DIABETIC INULIN LOW CARB DIET CHOCOLATE BARS... 2kg Bags,Tubs & Boxes Sweets. Boiled Sweets. Candy Sweets. Wedding Buffet Kits. Christmas Sweets. Easter Sweets. Fizzy Sweets. Haribo Sweets. PERLEGE MILK CHOCOLATE BAR. Delicious Sugar Free Belgian Milk Chocolate Bar, 85g, with Stevia. Including Sugar Free, Diabetic, Vegetarian, Vegan, Dairy Free, Gluten Free etc. Buying as a gift?. Ideal unique gifts or as joint place settings and favours at weddings. These bars can also be made using Vegan chocolate or Diabetic chocolate. Sweetener (Maltitol), Cocoa Butter, Whole Milk Powder (Milk ), Cocoa Powder, Emulsifier (Sunflower Lecithin), and natural flavouring (vanilla). Sweetener (Maltitol), Cocoa Paste, Cocoa Butter, Inulin,... Cocoa solids: 55% minimum. energy: 1859kJ/ 444kcal, fat: 32.2g, of which saturates: 20.2g, carbohydrate: 42.4g, of which sugars: 0.5g, of which polyols: 39.2g, fibre: 14.4g, protein: 5.3g, salt: 0.01g... Sugar Free Traditional Sweet Hamper Gift Box. 1 x Devon Toffee 100g. 1 x Sherbet Lemons 100g. 1 x Assorted Toffee 100g. 1 x Chocolate Eclairs 100g. DEVON TOFFEE (Sugar Free). ASSORTED TOFFEE (Sugar Fr... Diablo no added sugar chocolate spread 350g. This product contains all the great taste with no sugar added! It is delicious on its own as a sneaky spoonful, you could even use it to liven up a steamy ... Chocolate topped with freeze dried strawberry pieces. It is an exclusive recipe of chocolate and tastes just like regular chocolate but without the sugar. sweet creamy chocolate without the need for ... A selection of reduced sugar Belgian chocolates. A beautiful selection of reduced sugar milk, wh Continue reading >>

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

Chocolate As Diabetes Medicine

I used to say chocolate tasted great, but if you thought it was a health food, you were kidding yourself. But research shows that chocolate helps manage diabetes, prevents heart disease, and improves mood. Is this too good to be true? Next week, I’ll get back to toxic chemicals. This week, I felt like something tastier. According to nutritionist Amy Campbell, chocolate is made from cacao (cocoa) beans. The insides of the roasted beans, or the “nibs,” are crushed into a paste. So right there is a good start. We’ve written before about the diabetes benefits of beans, so chocolate has a good pedigree for health. Most of chocolate’s healing power seems to come from “flavonoids,” biological chemicals that Campbell says “are thought to help lower cholesterol and lower the risk of blood clots.” Other studies show chocolate can relax blood vessels; lower blood pressure, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and blood glucose; and improve insulin function. Unfortunately, pure chocolate is bitter. You have to add sugar to make it taste good. And pure chocolate is powdery and dry. You have to add an emulsifier, like fat, to give it an enjoyable texture. So authorities have long called chocolate harmful and told people, especially people with diabetes, to avoid it. Is there a way to get the benefits, minimize the harmful sugars and fats, and still have something you want to eat? The healing flavonoids and flavonols are in the dark part of the chocolate. About.com guide Elizabeth LaBau defines “dark chocolate” as “chocolate without milk solids added…The cocoa content of commercial dark chocolate bars can range from 30%… to 70%… or even above 80% for extremely dark bars. Common terms used to distinguish the cocoa content of dark chocolate bars [from bitterest to Continue reading >>

9 Ways Diabetics Can Still Enjoy Chocolate

9 Ways Diabetics Can Still Enjoy Chocolate

9 ways diabetics can still enjoy chocolate Its a myth that diabetics cant eat chocolate but they need to eat it in moderation, so these tips will help them, and non-diabetic chocoholics, resist too much choc temptation. Chocolate can be a real treat, but for diabetics it can be a real danger. The high sugar and fat content in our favourite indulgent snack means the nations four million diabetics may have a dangerous, and possibly even fatal, reaction if they eat too much chocolate, which can raise blood sugar to dangerous levels. But happily, that doesnt mean diabetics cant eat chocolate at all they just need to eat it in moderation - a mantra most of us should follow. [ Revealed: Calories and age - How much should you be eating?] Diabetes UK says: Its a myth that you cant eat chocolate if you have diabetes. Just eat it in moderation, rather than using it to satisfy hunger, and dont eat a lot in one go as it affects your blood sugar levels. Here are a few tips and reminders to help curb your chocolate consumption. Try eating a good-quality dark chocolate (70% cocoa if possible). It has a stronger taste than milk chocolate, so you shouldn't need to eat as much to satisfy chocolate cravings. If you want a chocolate bar with a filling, choose fruit rather than nuts because fruits lower in calories and fat than nuts - but check the fruit isnt coated in sugar. [ Read more: The 6 worst fruit and vegetables for your waistline and 4 to eat instead] Satisfy chocolate cravings by munching on chocolate-coated rice cakes or chocolate chip rice and corn. They tend to be lower in fat and calories than chocolate, but check labels as youll still need to be careful with the portion sizes if youre diabetic. Try lower-fat chocolate alternatives, such as lower-fat chocolate yoghurts and d Continue reading >>

Chocolate And Diabetes

Chocolate And Diabetes

Easter is a time for family, friends, new beginnings and, of course, chocolate… If you – or a child in the family – has diabetes, you might be wondering if it’s OK to eat chocolate and other sweet treats. How could eating chocolate affect your diabetes? Is ‘diabetic’ chocolate a good choice? We’re here to answer all your chocolate questions, plus there are eight top tips on how to eat chocolate in moderation and and some chocolate recipes. Can you eat chocolate if you have diabetes? When you have diabetes it’s important to eat a healthy, balanced diet and only include sugary, high-fat foods occasionally as a treat. That said, Easter only comes once a year, so don’t worry about the odd one or two indulgences as these will not affect your long-term blood diabetes management. It’s a myth that you can’t eat chocolate if you have diabetes, just eat it in moderation, rather than using it to satisfy hunger, and don’t eat a lot in one go as it affects your blood sugar levels. Should I buy ‘diabetic’ chocolate? In a word, no! Here’s why: Chocolate labelled ‘diabetic’contains a type of sweetener, such as fructose or sorbitol, which can affect blood sugar levels. It also tends to contain just as much fat as ordinary chocolate – and is often high in the really bad type of fats – saturated and trans fat. It usually has as many calories, if not more, than normal chocolate. It can a laxative effect and make you need the loo more often. It is also more expensive. Children and chocolate Easter is a fun time for children. There are Easter eggs to be eaten and Easter egg hunts they’ll want to be part of, so it’s important that they don’t feel that their diabetes excludes them from any of this. They’ll also want to enjoy a chocolate treat like Continue reading >>

Diabetics Guide To Sugar Free Chocolate

Diabetics Guide To Sugar Free Chocolate

People who are diagnosed with diabetes frequently fear that they will have to completely forsake their favorite desserts and tasty treats. While they definitely will have to follow a sound nutritional plan, there is room in most diabetic diets for the occasional splurge. Even better, there are companies that produce sugar free chocolate that is every bit as scrumptious as its white-sugar filled counterpart. Asher’s Chocolates has been in business for four generations, thereby perfecting the art of crafting fine chocolate products using a variety of recipes and techniques. Here’s what to look for to ensure that you’re getting the best possible sugar free chocolate: High-Quality Sweeteners Modern methods of crafting fine chocolates generally involve the use of a substance called maltitol that is particularly beneficial for diabetics because it’s absorbed slowly by the human digestive system, therefore minimizing chances of significant blood sugar spikes. Better yet, only part of it is absorbed. Perhaps the best bonus of all is that malitol contains about one-half the calories of standard white sugar. Malitol also doesn’t cause dental cavities the way that other sweetening agents do. There should be little, if any, difference in taste between high quality sugar free chocolate and its traditional counterparts. If you sample sugar free chocolate that has a noticeable “off taste,” the chances are excellent that you’ve encountered low quality product. You can guarantee superior taste experience by sticking with reputable companies such as ours! Cocoa Butter and Cocoa Powder Proper sweetness isn’t the only factor involved in selecting a sugarless chocolate. Connoisseurs of fine chocolates also appreciate a certain creamy texture, and this is where cocoa butter Continue reading >>

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Top 5 Diabetic Chocolate Picks

Are you a chocolate lover? And more importantly are you a diabetic on the lookout for your best chocolate options? I tend to make my own chocolate (and we have quite a few recipes for that), but I know most people aren't as motivated as me and prefer to buy something prepackaged. So to save you time and energy I went on a search for some ‘healthy' diabetic chocolate brands, ones I thought stood out of the crowd. When I did my search I was looking for ones low in carbs and preferably sugar free and made with stevia (my preferred natural sweetener). So I came up with a few good contenders for you to choose from and have gathered all the info below so you can make your own comparisons. 1. Dante's Confection This brand is a very popular top seller on Amazon, and I like it because it only contains 3 ingredients! Any ‘product' that has 5 or less ingredients, with ingredients we can recognize, gets the T2DT seal of approval It's also low in carbs and is excellent value for money. Another reason this one is the chocolate of choice is because it is the lowest in total carbs as well. Ingredients: Organic Fair-Trade Cocoa, Stevia, Natural Vanilla. Nutrition – Serving size: 45 g (1 bar) Calories: 260 Fat: 24 g Carbs: 12 g Fiber: 7 g Sugars: 0 g Net carbs: 5 g Protein: 7 g Cost: $16.99 for 4 x 45 g (1.5 oz) bars and many people say that eating just half a bar is all you need to feel satisfied. Check Out Dante's Confection on Amazon Here 2. Lily's Sweets Lily's Sweets has a variety of chocolate blends to choose from, dark chocolate, dark chocolate almond, milk chocolate, milk chocolate almond and more. These are sweetened with stevia and erythritol and have lots of good reviews on Amazon. They do contain a few more ingredients but some of their flavors might be worth exploring. Continue reading >>

Chocolate For Diabetics? Here’s What You Need To Know.

Chocolate For Diabetics? Here’s What You Need To Know.

The existence of chocolate dates as far back as 1900 BCE, and it used to only be available in Mesoamerica. Not only that, it existed in a form quite different from the ones we are familiar with now. Presently, the variety of chocolate has grown so much, it could fill up shelves after shelves. Spoilt for choice, how do you know which is the best chocolate for diabetics? Fret not! Here’s the lowdown on all the chocolatey goodness. Dark, milk or white? Here are the three most common blends of chocolate: dark, milk and white. But what constitutes each blend of chocolate? Here are the basics: Dark Chocolate — Made with more cocoa solids (i.e cocoa mass and cocoa butter) than milk products and sugar. Dark chocolate could contain anywhere between 35% to 100% of cocoa solids. It’s usually dark and bitter due to the high levels of cocoa. Milk Chocolate — Contains more milk products than cocoa solids, it’s sweeter and creamier than dark chocolate. The concentration of cocoa solids could be less than 35%. White Chocolate — It’s actually not classified as a genuine chocolate! This is due to the fact that white chocolate does not contain any cocoa solids (powder) at all. Instead, it contains cocoa butter, milk solids, milk fats and sweeteners. So…which is the best chocolate for diabetics? Chocolate may not really be the healthiest snack for people with diabetes. But the best chocolate for diabetics would be dark chocolate. And here is why. Dark chocolate has slightly fewer calories Comparing 100g of each blend of chocolate, dark chocolate (with 60% cocoa) has the least amount of calories. It is 21kcal less than milk chocolate and 28kcal less than white chocolate. Hence, if you’re watching your weight, it’s better to nibble on some dark chocolate instead. Dark cho Continue reading >>

Review: Choczero Low-carb Chocolates

Review: Choczero Low-carb Chocolates

If chocolates your thing (versus fries or ice cream) and youre in search of a low-carb alternative that is made with high-quality ingredients and real cocoathis might be the treat for you. ChocZero is sold by SnapFita company Id certainly never heard of before that actually sells ready-to-eat dinners for their transformation program , fiber supplements for your water, frozen yogurt andChocZero. About ChocZero: While cocoa offers several wonderful health benefits, most of us know that sugar does not, explains their website. Because of this, we set out to make a sinfully healthy indulgence that is not onlysuitable for diabetics, butwont hurt your waistlineeither. After spending several years perfecting our recipe, we were finally ready to bring ChocZero to the world: a natural, artisan-style,sugar-free chocolate. Rather than replacing sugar with sugar alcohols or artificial sweeteners, ChocZero uses a natural, solublevegetable fiberandmonk fruit extractto craft a guilt-free chocolate confection that tastes just as good as the next artisan chocolateif not better. My Review: Not so bad! If you want low-carb chocolate Made with pretty wholesome, real-food ingredients, these little chocolate bars consist of: dark chocolate, soluble corn fiber, sunflower lecithin, monk fruit extract, Madagascar bourbon vanilla beans, and natural flavor. The serving sizes arevery small, so keep that in mind when youre looking at the nutritional information. These little bars areabout as thick as 2 quarters stacked together.Not big. They are each wrapped in paper so the presentation really is trying to imply that these are not the kind of chocolates you buyto eat half the bag during an episode ofThe Walking Dead. These are high-end low-carb chocolates. Cost: Sold through Amazon , they cost $16. Continue reading >>

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