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Where Do I Begin Diabetes Booklet

How Can You Avoid The Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can You Avoid The Type 2 Diabetes?

If there is type 2 diabetes in the family, the risk of developing an illness increases. But this is only half the truth. Can the type 2 diabetes be avoided completely by healthy lifestyle? Type 2 diabetes is a number of diseases where the body's sugar, and usually also fat metabolism, is disturbed. Type 2 diabetes is a common cause of genome and lifestyle. It is not a disease caused by lifestyle alone, as it always requires hereditary susceptibility. Scientists are familiar with one hundred of the genes susceptible to diabetes, most of which affect pancreatic insulin secretion. When insulin is excreted too low or the cells that produce it work poorly, blood sugar rises. Overweight and internal body fat increases the insulin requirement, and again blood sugar rises. In lifestyle, diabetes risk can be reduced and some people can even completely prevent type 2 diabetes. When is the last moment to improve lifestyle? It's never too late. It is best to start improve your lifestyle, especially if there is overweight and type 2 diabetes found in parents or siblings. High blood sugar should trigger a lifestyle change. When glucose is 6 mmol / l, the body's sugar tolerance is weakened. Unless at this stage you make any lifestyle improvements, the state progresses gradually into diabetes. Healthy lifestyle can prevent, but also treat diabetes, and no drug is as effective as good lifestyle choices. The lifestyle change is never too early. Unlike many people think, type 2 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed on working age people. Why is waist obesity particularly dangerous? Waist obesity goes in hand in hand with the inner body fat. When the liver grows fat, it starts to produce more sugar. The internal fat also increases the risk of coronary heart disease. The waist of the woman h Continue reading >>

Patients: Register For Diabetes Education, Insurance Information And More - Inova

Patients: Register For Diabetes Education, Insurance Information And More - Inova

(Intended for use with inpatient care during your stay at the hospital and preparing for discharge) The following forms and information are required for all programs except the Pre-diabetes Program. If you have questions, contact the Inova Diabetes Center location where you will be receiving services. Ask your physician to complete an order form. for diabetes education to take to your doctor. Inova Diabetes Center requires an order form from your doctor to provide services. Find the location for the class or program that interests you and call to reserve a spot. Check with your insurance company about coverage. Some insurance companies also require pre-authorizationto cover our services. Print out and complete an assessment form Print the appropriate forms below that you need for your first appointment. If you have not completed the assessment form prior to your appointment, please arrive 20 to 30 minutes early to allow adequate time to complete the form. Assessment forms: (All in PDF format Continue reading >>

Managing My Diabetes

Managing My Diabetes

Sub Navigation for Preventing complications Sub Navigation for Kids, teens & diabetes We have an assortment of healthy living resources, educational webinars, information and much more available to help you live well with diabetes. Diabetes Canada's collection of healthy living resources will share the latest information to help you live well with diabetes. View tools & resources - Tools & resources Whether you are looking for diabetes-friendly recipes for yourself or for someone with diabetes, you can search our delicious collection of savoury and sweet recipes. If left untreated or improperly managed, diabetes can lead to a variety of complications including heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and blindness. Understand all complications how to prevent them here. Whether your child has been recently diagnosed with diabetes or has been living with diabetes for some time, you may both have questions about diabetes management, diet, and how diabetes may affect your child's ability to just be a kid. Continue reading >>

Getting Started On Insulin

Getting Started On Insulin

You Can Make The Difference In Your Diabetes Care! Your doctor has told you it is time to begin injecting insulin as part of your overall diabetes therapy. This website and BD patient education booklets are designed to help you learn the new skills you need to lead a healthy life with diabetes: What diabetes is all about What you need to know to begin taking insulin How to recognize and treat low blood sugar reactions How to check your blood glucose levels Make you aware of the medical tests or tasks needed to manage your diabetes. You will find out why it is important to work closely with your diabetes health care team members as they help develop a treatment plan especially for you. You will also discover why you need to stay with your treatment plan and follow up regularly with your doctor. If your diabetes goes untreated, over time high levels of blood glucose can damage your vital organs. This could lead to heart disease and stroke; high blood pressure;vision problems or blindness; kidney disease; nervous system disease; problems with your teeth and gums; amputations of feet or toes; and complications of pregnancy. However, recent advances in diabetes treatment that you will read about on these pages have helped people to control their diabetes successfully and live healthily. Regular visits to your doctor are essential. This information is based on the Diabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines. Important Note Not all products or therapies are approved in Canada. Please consult your local health care provider in Canada. Continue reading >>

Teaching Girls With Diabetes About Pregnancy

Teaching Girls With Diabetes About Pregnancy

Teaching Girls With Diabetes About Pregnancy As a nurse and public health expert working with teens in the 1980s, Denise Charron-Prochownik, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN, a professor at the University of Pittsburghs School of Nursing and Graduate School of Public Health, found that many girls with diabetes werent aware of the additional risks high blood glucose posed to pregnant women and their babiesor even that pre-conception counseling for women with diabetes was an option. At the same time, questionnaires showed that more than a quarter of the teen girls Charron-Prochownik worked with were sexually active. That convinced her that education about contraception and pre-conception counseling needed to start at puberty. Thats whats tricky, she says. You never know when youre going to get pregnant. With the help of grants from the ADA, Charron-Prochownik developed an education program called Ready Girls, which consisted of a DVD and booklet targeted at teens. The program emphasizes the importance of family planning, contraception, and tight metabolic control starting at conception. An updated version of the bookletDiabetes and Reproductive Health for Girls is available for free . Follow-up studies with some of the programs early participants were encouraging: Girls who had been through the program started having sex two years later than girls who hadnt and were much more likely to use contraception and raise the topic of diabetes and pregnancy with their health care providers. ADA funding has also made it possible to adapt the Ready Girls material to address the rising numbers of girls with type 2 diabetes . Theres very little difference: A lot of women with type 2 will go on to use insulin, Charron-Prochownik says. Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease where your body cannot control its blood sugar levels properly – either because your body doesn’t make enough (or any) insulin, or because your cells have become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a chemical produced in the pancreas. It helps your body process sugars. If blood sugar levels aren’t kept under control, diabetes can be life-threatening. Diabetes can lead to other health conditions, including kidney failure, eye disease, foot ulceration and a higher risk of heart disease. Keeping your blood sugar at a safe level means you’re less likely to have other health problems. There’s no cure for diabetes, but there are things you can do to stay well. Support from your friends, whānau and health care providers can help. Heart and diabetes checks Diabetes is our largest and fastest growing health issue we face in New Zealand. Diabetes is closely linked with heart disease (also known as cardiovascular disease or CVD), and together they are responsible for the deaths of more New Zealanders each year than cigarettes are. Many of these deaths are preventable. The More Heart and Diabetes Checks Health Target has been established to help save these lives – aiming to have regular heart and diabetes checks for at least 90 percent of those at risk of developing these conditions. Find out more about heart and diabetes checks. How common is diabetes? There are over 240,000 people in New Zealand who have been diagnosed with diabetes (mostly type 2). It is thought there are another 100,000 people who have it but don’t know. Diabetes is most common among Māori and Pacific Islanders. They’re three times as likely to get it as other New Zealanders. South Asian people are also more likely to develop diabetes. The number of people with both types of Continue reading >>

My Diabetes

My Diabetes

This section provides information on diabetes, the different types and what to consider when managing diabetes, as well as specific information for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and carers of people with diabetes. There is also more general health and wellbeing information, covering topics such as nutrition, exercise, travel and more. The information in this section is of a general nature only and should not be substituted for medical advice or used to alter medical therapy. It does not replace consultations with qualified healthcare professionals to meet your individual medical needs. When someone has diabetes, the body cant maintain healthy levels of glucose in the blood. Glucose, which is a form of sugar, is the main source of energy for our bodies. It comes from foods we eat such as breads, cereals, fruit, starchy vegetables, legumes, milk, yoghurt and sweets. Glucose can also be made by your liver for times when youre not eating, like overnight. Glucose is carried around the body in the blood stream. The levels of blood glucose are controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. As glucose enters the blood stream, the pancreas releases more insulin. The role of insulin is to help glucose go from the blood stream into the cells, such as your muscles, where it is needed for energy. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas cant make insulin, or when there is not enough insulin, or insulin cant work effectively. In this section, you will find information on diabetes, printable fact sheets, and a list of useful links. Diabetes information is targeted by type of diabetes, as well as being directed toward specific groups such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, culturally and linguistically diverse communities and carers for people with Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Eyes, Heart, Nerves, Feet, And Kidneys

Diabetes And Your Eyes, Heart, Nerves, Feet, And Kidneys

Diabetes is a serious disease that can affect your eyes, heart, nerves, feet and kidneys. Understanding how diabetes affects your body is important. It can help you follow your treatment plan and stay as healthy as possible. If your diabetes is not well controlled, the sugar level in your blood goes up. This is called “hyperglycemia” (high blood sugar). High blood sugar can cause damage to very small blood vessels in your body. Imagine what happens to sugar when it is left unwrapped overnight. It gets sticky. Now imagine how sugar “sticks” to your small blood vessels and makes it hard for blood to get to your organs. Damage to blood vessels occurs most often in the eyes, heart, nerves, feet, and kidneys. Let’s look at how this damage happens. Eyes. Having high levels of sugar in your blood for a long time can harm the tiny blood vessels in your eyes. This can result in vision problems or blindness. Heart. High blood sugar may also harm larger blood vessels in your body that supply oxygen to your heart and brain. Fat can build up in the blood vessels as well. This can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Nerves. Nerves carry important messages between your brain and other parts of your body. Having high levels of sugar in your blood for many years can damage the blood vessels that bring oxygen to some nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending pain signals. Feet. Diabetes can harm your feet in two ways. First, it can damage your body’s nerves. Nerve damage stops you from feeling pain or other problems in your feet. Another way that diabetes can cause damage to your feet is from poor blood circulation. Poor blood flow makes it hard for a sore or infection to heal. If sores don’t heal and get infected, it can lead to amputation. Kidneys. Think of your kidneys like Continue reading >>

Nkf Brochures

Nkf Brochures

For multiple copies and distribution or commercial use, please contact NKF for copyright permission. Copyright Information The information, text, logos, images, pictures, video or audio (collectively, the Content) included in and constituting the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) Website are protected by applicable U.S. and international copyright and trademark laws, and may not be used in any form in whole or in part without prior written permission of the Foundation. Single copies of the Content of the NKF Website may be printed for personal or educational purposes without permission, and must include the original copyright notice. General Topics Health Issues Lifestyle Nutrition Organ and Tissue Donation Palliative Care Treatments for Kidney Failure NKF Brochures - Spanish ACERCA DE LA ENFERMEDAD RENAL CRÓNICA: UNA GUÍA PARA PACIENTES About Chronic Kidney Disease: A Guide for Patients CENAR AFUERA CON CONFIANZA: Una guía para pacientes con enfermedad renal​ Dining Out With Confidence: A Guide for Patients With Kidney Disease DIABETES: Los ojos, el corazón, los nervios, los pies y los riñones Diabetes: The Eyes, Heart , Nerves, Kidneys and Feet EL CONTROL DEL HIERRO: Cuando Tiene Enfermedad Renal o Insuficiencia Renal IRON CONTROL: When You Have Kidney Disease or Renal Failure Lo que Necesita Saber sobre el ACCESO VASCULAR Hemodialysis Access: What You Need to Know NUTRICIÓN Y ENFERMEDAD RENAL CRÓNICA (ETAPAS 1 A 4) - ¿Está obteniendo lo que necesita? Nutrition and Chronic Kidney Disease: Stages 1–4 NUTRICIÓN E INSUFICIENCIA RENAL (E TA PA 5) - ¿Está obteniendo lo que necesita? Nutrition and Kidney Failure (Stage 5): Are You Getting What You Need? Continue reading >>

Sms Education For The Promotion Of Diabetes Self-management In Low & Middle Income Countries: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial In Egypt

Sms Education For The Promotion Of Diabetes Self-management In Low & Middle Income Countries: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial In Egypt

SMS education for the promotion of diabetes self-management in low & middle income countries: a pilot randomized controlled trial in Egypt Due to the ubiquity of mobile phones in low and middle income countries, we aimed to examine the feasibility of SMS education among diabetic patients in Egypt, and assess the impact of educational text messages, compared to traditional paper-based methods, on glycemic control and self-management behaviors. We conducted a 12-week randomized controlled trial at Misr University for Science & Technology hospital in Cairo-Egypt. Known as MUST diabetes awareness program, patients were included if they had diabetes, owned a mobile phone, and could read SMS messages or lived with someone that could read for them. Intervention patients received daily messages and weekly reminders addressing various diabetes care categories. We expected greater improvement in their glycemic control compared to controls who only received paper-based educational material. The primary outcome was the change in HbA1c, measured by the difference between endpoint and baseline values and by the number of patients who experienced at least 1% reduction from baseline to endpoint. Key secondary outcomes included blood glucose levels, body weight, treatment and medication adherence, self-efficacy, and diabetes knowledge. Data were analyzed using ANCOVA, chi-square, and t-tests. Thirty four intervention and 39 control patients completed the study. Over 12weeks, 3880 messages were sent. Each intervention patient received 84 educational and 12 reminder messages plus one welcome message. Our primary outcome did not differ significantly ( 0.290; 95% CI -0.402 to 0.983; p = 0.406) between groups after 3months, demonstrating a mean drop of 0.69% and 1.05% in the control and int Continue reading >>

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease. Follow these steps to get started on your game plan. If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds. Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day. Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week. Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active. Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity. It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your friends and family involved by asking them to support your changes. You can also join a diabetes prevention program to meet other people who are making similar changes. Set a weight-loss goal If you are ov Continue reading >>

Patient Booklets - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

Patient Booklets - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

NCEC NATIONAL CLINICAL GUIDELINE NO. 17 ADULT TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS On the 25th of June 2018, the Minister for Health will launch the first National Clinical Guideline for Adults living with Type 1 Diabetes. The publication of the guideline will see an agreed framework that will ensure all adults with type 1 diabetes regardless of where they live in Ireland, have equitable access to high quality care. The guideline will also act as a driver to standardise type 1 diabetes care nationally. This booklet contains general information on Type 1 diabetes. It is for adults living with Type 1 diabetes and aims to support you in managing your type 1 diabetes well on a daily basis. The contents are divided into three sections, an introduction to Type 1 diabetes, ongoing care of Type 1 Diabetes and Living well with Type 1 diabetes. You can dip into the different sections of the booklet as they apply to you and it will be an additional resource for you when managing your diabetes. This is your one stop Type 2 diabetes information booklet covering daily management, health eating guidelines, physical activity recommendations, preparing for your diabetes appointments, medications, entitlements and other lifestyle issues. The complete reference guide and essential reading for all people with Type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Insulin | Fda

Insulin | Fda

Insulin helps to take the sugar in your blood to other parts of your body. Diabetes affects how your body makes or uses insulin. Diabetes can make it hard to control how much sugar is in your blood. There are different kinds of insulin that people with diabetes can use every day to help them stay healthy. This booklet gives some basic facts about insulin. Use this booklet to help you talk to your doctor about the kind of insulin that you are taking. Do not wait. Diabetes is a serious illness. Diabetes can cause a heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and other serious health problems. This is why it is so important for you to get treatment for your diabetes. Treatment can help prevent or slow some of these serious health problems. Exercise, eat a balanced diet, and take your diabetes medicines. You can do it. Ask your healthcare provider these questions before you start using your insulin. How will my insulin affect my blood sugar? What do I do if I start having side effects? What are the signs that my blood sugar might be too low or too high? Should I carry glucose tabs with me and how should I use them? What should I do if I am pregnant, planning to get pregnant, or breastfeeding? What else should I know about my diabetes medicines? Write down the facts about your insulin the next time you talk to your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Name: ____________________________________________________________ People with type 1 diabetes make very little or no insulin in their bodies. They must take insulin every day to stay alive. People with type 2 diabetes do not make enough insulin or do not use it well enough. Some people with type 2 diabetes can use pills or other medicines that are injected into the body. Other people with type 2 also need insulin t Continue reading >>

College Diabetes Networks Creates New Booklets For Students And Parents

College Diabetes Networks Creates New Booklets For Students And Parents

If you’re familiar with me or my blog, then you probably know about my history with the the non-profit organization College Diabetes Network (CDN). I went from attending meetings as a member, to leading them as chapter president, and now I participate as much as possible as an alum. This incredible organization’s mission is to provide innovative, peer-based programs which connect and empower students and young professionals to thrive with diabetes. Over the years, CDN has grown into a full-blown network with chapters at colleges and universities across the country. As CDN has flourished, the hard-working team at its Boston headquarters has established numerous tools and resources for use by young adults with type one diabetes. Recently, the Off to College Event Hosting Guide (OTC Guide) received an exciting revitalization to better address the need for information to help incoming college freshmen. The OTC Guide is a step-by-step guide for individuals who want to hold an event to prepare high school students with diabetes for the transition to college. Initially, Lilly Diabetes provided a grant that made it possible for CDN to create 200 Event Hosting Kits with the guide, brochures, and handouts for the hosts to give to attendees. This year, the guide was adapted into audience-specific booklets—one for parents and one for students, covering essential information from accommodations to having “the talk” with friends and roommates about diabetes. The booklets were medically and scientifically reviewed and approved by the American Diabetes Association, and thanks to support from Lilly, Dexcom, and Tandem, CDN is able to make them available to any family in the United States at no cost. While the student booklet focuses on logistics—for example, how and why to r Continue reading >>

In Milestone Trial, Experimental Drug Delays Type 1 Diabetes

In Milestone Trial, Experimental Drug Delays Type 1 Diabetes

In milestone trial, experimental drug delays type 1 diabetes Marking the culmination of a 33-year odyssey, scientists today report a milestone in type 1 diabetes: the first time the disease has been markedly delayed in young people at high risk. Presenting at the American Diabetes Association meeting in San Francisco, California,and publishing simultaneously in ), researchers found that 2 weeks of an experimental intravenous (IV) drug held off disease by an average of about 2years. The mainstay of type 1 diabetes treatment is insulin, discovered 97 years ago. These results open a new chapter, says Jeffrey Bluestone, an immunologist at the University of California, San Francisco, and part of the research team. On the one hand, the outcome is pretty exciting, Bluestone says. On the other hand, now the real hard work begins. That will mean considering how to move this treatment forward and probing whom its most likely to help. The clinical trial began 8 years ago and included 76 people, the youngest of whom were 8 years old and the oldest in their 40s. Nearly three-quarters were 18 and under. Each had an extremely high risk of type 1 diabetes. In this autoimmune disease, the body attacks cells in the pancreas that make insulin, which helps keep blood glucose levels in check. By the time diabetes is diagnosed, most of these insulin-producing cells, called beta cells, are gone. More than 1million people in the United States have type 1 diabetes, which requires constant attention to blood sugar levels and insulin injections to stay alive. The condition carries a risk of long-term complications, including heart disease, blindness, and kidney failure. (People with the more common type 2 diabetes generally produce their own insulin, but their bodies cant use it properly.) Over Continue reading >>

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