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Where Can More Information Be Found About Prediabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes – where the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin type 2 diabetes – where the body doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. During pregnancy, some women have such high levels of blood glucose that their body is unable to produce enough insulin to absorb it all. This is known as gestational diabetes. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as pre-diabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor Visit your GP as soon as possible if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes, which include: urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. Causes of diabetes The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's broken down to produce ene Continue reading >>

Doihaveprediabetes.org | Faq

Doihaveprediabetes.org | Faq

What exactly is prediabetes and how common is it?+ One in three American adults has prediabetes, but only 10 percent of them know they have it. Prediabetes means a person's blood glucose (sugar) level is higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed with diabetes. People with prediabetes are on the road to develop type 2 diabetes within several years, and are also at increased risk for serious health problems, such as stroke and heart disease. There are some prediabetes risks you can't control, like age and family history. But there are things you can do to reduce your risk, such as increased physical activity and weight loss. And making these lifestyle changes can also help prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. There are not usually symptoms when you have prediabetes. Talk to your doctor to know for sure. A simple blood test can confirm if you have prediabetes. I got a high score on the online risk test. Do I have prediabetes?+ A high score on the online risk test means you most likely have prediabetes, but only a blood test can tell you for sure, so talk to your doctor. Your doctor will do a simple blood test to check your blood sugar levels. If those levels are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes, it means you do have prediabetes. But the good news is... as you have just learned... that prediabetes can often be reversed. How close is prediabetes to having type 2 diabetes?+ Without making changes, many people with prediabetes can develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. If you don't make lifestyle changes, it puts you at greater risk. Studies show that losing just 5-7 percent of your body weight, by eating healthier and doing regular exercise can help prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. For a person who w Continue reading >>

Diagnosing, Treating And Preventing Prediabetes

Diagnosing, Treating And Preventing Prediabetes

Before developing the serious health condition of type 2 diabetes, a person will almost always have prediabetes first. But prediabetes is a condition without symptoms, meaning that many people can have it without even knowing it. Left unchecked, prediabetes can lead to full-blown type 2 diabetes, which increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Luckily, prediabetes can be diagnosed with a simple test, and treatment can prevent many health problems and complications. Here's what you need to know to control prediabetes before it gets control of you. Diabetes Basics Under normal circumstances, the glucose (sugar) levels in your blood rise after you eat a meal or snack. In response, your body produces a hormone called insulin, which is needed for the body to convert the glucose in your bloodstream into usable energy. But if insulin isn’t available, or if the body isn’t using it correctly, your blood glucose will remain elevated, and that can be harmful to your body. This is a condition known as diabetes. People who have higher-than-normal blood glucose levels that aren’t quite high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes have prediabetes. In the past, individuals with prediabetes would have been considered "borderline diabetic." Who's at Risk? Over 50 million Americans over the age of 20 have prediabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. If you have any of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes, including uncontrollable factors like age and race, and/or controllable risk factors like obesity and physical inactivity, then you are also at risk for prediabetes. Most of the time, prediabetes is asymptomatic (shows no symptoms), but some people will experience some general diabetes symptoms like extreme thirst, frequent urination, fatigue and/or blurred Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes - Did You Know Insulin Resistance Can Be Reversed?

Pre-diabetes - Did You Know Insulin Resistance Can Be Reversed?

What you're about to read could transform your health forever. If you have been diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes or believe you have this condition, we are so glad you found us. We are here to help. Our website is dedicated to helping you better understand your condition and the specific steps you can take to reverse it. The information on this site is not about fad diets, magic pills or fantasy claims to transform the way you look and feel overnight. It is about accurate scientific information that can help you change the way your body responds to food and reverse a condition called Insulin Resistance. This important information cannot be easily explained in a brief way. So we urge you to take a little time to read the next few pages to learn why and how you can finally achieve your goals of losing weight and feeling healthy. Insulite Laboratories firmly believes that information is power when it comes to managing your health. We put your health first, ahead of making business success. Our primary aim and commitment is to support your efforts toward health and wellbeing. You can contact us at any time to have your questions about Pre-Diabetes answered. As part of our pledge to do all we can to help you feel better, we offer free consultations with our Consulting and Advisory teams about any issues you might have concerning your condition. You can take advantage of a free consultation without commiting to start the multi-level Insulite System. If you do begin the System, however, you will enjoy the reassurance of knowing you can continue to contact our experts for free advice. To learn about Pre-Diabetes and Insulin Resistance, continue reading below. To learn about a system that is specifically designed to help you manage Pre-Diabetes and reverse insulin resistance Click he Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is the precursor stage before diabetes mellitus in which not all of the symptoms required to diagnose diabetes are present, but blood sugar is abnormally high. This stage is often referred to as the "grey area."[1] It is not a disease; the American Diabetes Association says,[2] "Prediabetes should not be viewed as a clinical entity in its own right but rather as an increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Prediabetes is associated with obesity (especially abdominal or visceral obesity), dyslipidemia with high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension."[2] It is thus a metabolic diathesis or syndrome, and it usually involves no symptoms and only high blood sugar as the sole sign. Impaired fasting blood sugar and impaired glucose tolerance are two forms of prediabetes that are similar in clinical definition (glucose levels too high for their context) but are physiologically distinct.[3] Insulin resistance, the insulin resistance syndrome (metabolic syndrome or syndrome X), and prediabetes are closely related to one another and have overlapping aspects. Classification[edit] Impaired fasting glucose[edit] Main article: Impaired fasting glycaemia Impaired fasting glycaemia or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) refers to a condition in which the fasting blood glucose or the 3-month average blood glucose (A1C) is elevated above what is considered normal levels but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes mellitus. It is considered a pre-diabetic state, associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology, although of lesser risk than impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG sometimes progresses to type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a 50% risk over 10 years of progressing to overt diabetes. Many newl Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage Found In Prediabetics

Nerve Damage Found In Prediabetics

The pain shot across the tops of Michael Jackson's feet as if someone was pounding him with a sledgehammer, sometimes becoming so unbearable he couldn't sleep. The aerospace engineer blamed it on arthritis until his primary care physician ruled that out. Tests for Lupus and Lou Gherig's disease also came back negative. Finally, a doctor cut a small sample of skin from one of Jackson's feet and counted the nerve fibers under a microscope. Jackson suffered from significant nerve damage stemming from prediabetes — a condition in which people have high blood glucose levels but not enough to be classified as diabetes. Doctors have known for a while that those with prediabetes can experience mild weakness, numbness and pain from nerve damage, but a new Johns Hopkins study suggests that so-called neuropathy is much more significant than once thought. Like Jackson, patients can experience excruciating pain more typically associated with full-blown diabetes. About 50 percent of people with diabetes have neuropathy, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The numbness associated with neuropathy can contribute to some diabetics' eventual need for amputation. Diabetics tend to have poor blood circulation, which can lead to infection and ulcers. A patient may not notice an injury or infection due to lack of feeling, leading to amputation. The Johns Hopkins researchers say their findings provide evidence that patients should be screened for prediabetes and neuropathy much earlier than once thought. The medical community also needs to do a better job at treating and diagnosing those with prediabetes, the researchers concluded. An estimated one in three Americans — 86 million people — have prediabetes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Co Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Topic Overview What is prediabetes? Prediabetes is a warning sign that you are at risk for getting type 2 diabetes. It means that your blood sugar is higher than it should be, but not high enough to be diabetes. Prediabetes is also called impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose. Most people who get type 2 diabetes have prediabetes first. What causes prediabetes? The food you eat turns into sugar, which your body uses for energy. Normally, an organ called the pancreas makes insulin, which allows the sugar in your blood to get into your body's cells. But when your body can't use insulin the right way, the sugar doesn't move into cells. It stays in your blood instead. This is called insulin resistance. The buildup of sugar in the blood causes prediabetes. People who are overweight, aren't physically active, and have a family history of diabetes are more likely to get prediabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes are also more likely to get prediabetes. What are the symptoms? Most people with prediabetes don't have any symptoms. But if you have prediabetes, you need to watch for signs of diabetes, such as: Feeling very thirsty. Urinating more often than usual. Feeling very hungry. Having blurred vision. Losing weight without trying. How is prediabetes diagnosed? A blood test can tell if you have prediabetes. You have prediabetes if:2 How is it treated? The key to treating prediabetes and preventing type 2 diabetes is getting your blood sugar levels back to a normal range. You can do this by making some lifestyle changes. Watch your weight. If you are overweight, losing just a small amount of weight may help. Reducing fat around your waist is particularly important. Make healthy food choices. Limit the amount of unhealthy fat you eat, such as saturated Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

When you have prediabetes that means your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. Having prediabetes means that you face an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and other serious conditions. With prediabetes blood sugars are not normal, but they are not quite in the diabetes range. In this video, Steven Edelman, MD, director of Taking Control of Your Diabetes, explains why people should take a prediabetes diagnosis seriously. If your blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, then you are likely "prediabetic." If you are prediabetic, you have a higher than normal chance of developing type 2 diabetes. However, research shows that you can lower your risk for type 2 diabetes by losing weight and exercising moderately. Even losing 10 to 15 pounds has been shown to be effective in controlling blood glucose levels. Most adults who are overweight, have high blood pressure, or have a family history of diabetes should be tested by their primary care physician during annual check-ups. Most people are familiar with the "fasting plasma glucose test" (FPG) to determine blood sugar levels. There is also the "oral glucose tolerance test" (OGTT) or the A1C test to detect prediabetes. Normal FPG is below 100 mg/dl. A person with prediabetes has a fasting blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl. If the fasting blood glucose level rises to 126 mg/dl or above, or if the A1C is 6.5% or greater a person has diabetes. Prediabetes is a state where the blood glucose is higher than normal, however not high enough to be classified as diabetes. It can be diagnosed with basic blood work that is typically monitored by your primary care physician. What it demons Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: Deal With It Now, Lower Your Risk Of Getting The Full-blown Disease

Prediabetes: Deal With It Now, Lower Your Risk Of Getting The Full-blown Disease

Prediabetes is an incredibly common condition in which blood sugar is higher than it should be, but isn't quite high enough to be type 2 diabetes. An estimated 84 million people in the United States, including more than a third of adults 18 and older and nearly half of adults 65 and up, are thought to have prediabetes. If you have prediabetes, you don't have diabetes. But don't relax just yet. Prediabetes is a serious condition in and of itself. Prediabetes is linked to a great risk of heart disease and stroke due to the chronic damage that elevated blood sugar can cause to your heart and blood vessels. Studies have show that most people with prediabetes–but not allwill have type 2 diabetes within a decade. On the upside, taking steps to lower your blood sugar now can help prevent or delay the onset of full-blown diabetes. If you lose 5 to 7 percent of your body weight through lifestyle changes, you can considerably diminish your likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. Impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose Prediabetes is characterized by two conditions: impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose. If you have one or both conditions, you are considered prediabetic. (Both tests can also be used to diagnose diabetes.) In both cases, your blood sugar is elevated, but falls short of diabetes. For example, if your blood sugar is between 140 and 199 mg/dl two hours after an oral glucose test, you have impaired glucose tolerance (a diabetes diagnosis requires a blood sugar of 200 mg/dL or higher after an oral glucose test). If you had a blood sugar between 100 and 125 mg/dl after an overnight fast, you would have impaired fasting glucose (a diabetes diagnosis would be 126 mg/dl or higher). "Now, neither of those conditions are actually diabetes Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diagnosis?

Prediabetes Diagnosis?

Turn things around before diabetes occurs In 2012, 86 million Americans over age 20 had prediabetes – a nearly 9 percent increase over 2010 stats, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you’re among the 86 million with prediabetes, you need to know there are steps you can take to manage your condition and avoid developing type 2 diabetes. The risks are real Prediabetes occurs when your fasting blood glucose, or sugar, level is above normal. Prediabetes can progress to type 2 diabetes, in which the body does not produce or use enough of the hormone insulin to turn glucose into energy. Diabetes is linked to high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, eye problems and other serious health conditions. “One of the biggest things to remember with prediabetes is that it does not automatically turn into type 2 diabetes or heart disease,” explained Novant Health Diabetes Center Diabetes Educator Cathy Thomas, MSN, RN, CDE. People with prediabetes are definitely at a much higher risk of developing either one or both, though. People with prediabetes have nearly double the risk of developing cardiovascular disease than people with normal glucose levels. And those who have diabetes have a two to four times greater risk of cardiovascular disease. “The risks are very real, especially if you ignore your diagnosis,” Thomas said. “But there’s no reason to panic. Prediabetes acts as a really good early warning system for the body, signaling people to make some lifestyle changes to avoid more serious conditions.” An “early warning system” “I found out about my prediabetes two years ago when I was diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which puts me at greater risk for diabetes,” said Regan White, 33, Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes And Why Does It Matter?

What Is Prediabetes And Why Does It Matter?

When I’m seeing a new patient, I am especially alert to certain pieces of their history. Do they have a strong family history of diabetes? Are they of Latino, Asian, Native-American, or African-American ethnicity? Did they have diabetes in pregnancy? Are they overweight or obese? Do they have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)? Why do I care about these things? Because they may be clues that the patient is at risk for developing adult-onset (type 2) diabetes, and that can lead to multiple major medical problems. Many people have heard of type 2 diabetes, a disease where the body loses its ability to manage sugar levels. Adult-onset diabetes most often affects people with known risk factors and can take years to fully develop, unlike juvenile (type 1) diabetes, which can develop randomly and quickly. Here is why high blood sugar is a problem Untreated or undertreated diabetes means persistently high blood sugars, which can cause horrible arterial blockages, resulting in strokes and heart attacks. High blood sugars also cause nerve damage, with burning leg pain that eventually gives way to numbness. This, combined with the arterial blockages, can result in deformities and dead tissue, which is why many people with diabetes end up with amputations. The tiny blood vessels to the retina are also affected, which can cause blindness. And don’t forget the kidneys, which are especially susceptible to the damage caused by high blood sugar. Diabetes is a leading cause of kidney failure requiring dialysis and/or kidney transplant. But wait! There’s more. High blood sugar impairs the white blood cell function critical to a healthy immune system, and sugar is a great source of energy for invading bacteria and fungi. These factors put folks at risk of nasty infections of all kin Continue reading >>

Have You Got Pre-diabetes? One In Three Of Us Is On The Brink Of Full Diabetes - Which Cuts Six Years Off Your Life. And Fat Or Slim, You May Be A Victim

Have You Got Pre-diabetes? One In Three Of Us Is On The Brink Of Full Diabetes - Which Cuts Six Years Off Your Life. And Fat Or Slim, You May Be A Victim

The figures are grim. More than one in three adults has ‘pre-diabetes’ and has no idea they’re at risk, according to research just published in the British Medical Journal. As a result, Britain is facing a type 2 diabetes epidemic of unprecedented proportions. Type 2 diabetes, the kind that develops in adulthood and is linked to lifestyle, is not a condition to be dismissed lightly— it can reduce life expectancy and lead to complications such as blindness and amputation that seriously affect quality of life. Pre-diabetes is a term used to indicate you have raised blood sugar levels and are therefore at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in future. The rapid rise in the numbers said to be affected by pre-diabetes — three times what they were a decade ago — has come as a shock even to medics. Scroll down for video ‘This study has taken us all by surprise — it’s been a bit of a health bombshell,’ says Dr Stephen Lawrence, a GP and clinical adviser on diabetes to the Royal College of General Practitioners. The figures are ‘alarming’, says Simon O’Neill, director of policy at Diabetes UK. ‘It’s worse than we expected.’ It must be acknowledged that some specialists aren’t convinced that pre-diabetes exists. ‘It’s nonsense,’ says Craig Currie, professor of applied pharmacoepidemiology, Institute of Primary Care and Public Health at Cardiff University. ‘Either you have type 2 diabetes or you don’t have type 2 diabetes. I think this is simply a scare tactic to make people take notice.’ However, the consensus is that raised blood sugar levels, whether they’re labelled pre-diabetes or not, are not healthy. So, how can you tell if you are at risk — and what can you do to protect yourself? We talked to the experts... HOW CAN Continue reading >>

Bmj: Can We Trust The Numbers That Define Pre-diabetes?

Bmj: Can We Trust The Numbers That Define Pre-diabetes?

Editor’s note: The following post is by Michael Joyce, MD, who joined HealthNewsReview.org this week as a full-time writer/producer. Michael is a Mayo-trained physician who has transitioned into multimedia journalism. He has written and produced video, radio, and photojournalism in both the US and Asia. We are excited about the new capabilities and insight that he brings to our team. He tweets as @mlmjoyce. Numbers, numbers, numbers. They can impress, legitimize, and (supposedly) don’t lie. Some of the biggest numbers you’ll see in healthcare have to do with projections regarding diabetes. Some examples: the American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that by 2050, 1 out of 3 Americans will have diabetes; the World Health Organization (WHO) projects 100 million diabetics in India by 2030, and 150 million in China by 2040. Faced with such impressive numbers, our media messengers struggle to communicate the scale of what we’re up against. We have grown accustomed to hearing about a Type 2 diabetes “epidemic” or “crisis.” Adding gravitas to this perception of catastrophe is the growing acceptance of a condition called “pre-diabetes” in which blood sugar levels that were previously considered marginally elevated are now considered harbingers of inevitable (?) disease. This essentially elevates what was once considered a risk factor into a pre-disease. We are now told that 1 out of 3 Americans are pre-diabetic and 90 percent of us don’t even know it. Given current ADA thresholds for pre-diabetes over half the population of China – nearly 500 million people – would be labeled as vulnerable. According to the the ADA, a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dL qualifies as pre-diabetic. Likewise, a glycated hemoglobin (commonly referred to as Continue reading >>

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