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Where Can I Get A Diabetic Alert Dog

Diabetes Alert Dogs

Diabetes Alert Dogs

Breanne Harris, 25, first encountered a diabetes alert dog when she was a counselor at a camp for children with diabetes. Two people from Dogs4Diabetics, Inc., (D4D) – a nonprofit organization that trains assistance dogs to detect hypoglycemia in people with diabetes – brought an alert-dog-in-training to camp. Every night, the counselors would make midnight rounds to check campers’ blood glucose levels. In the dormitory, the dog tore free from the trainer, ran to one teenager, jumped on the bed, and tried to awaken the girl. “We checked her blood sugar immediately, and her sugar was 32 mg/dl, which is severely low,” says Harris, who has lived with Type 1 diabetes since she was 4. “I was sold at that point and applied for a dog.” Kristen Beard, 24, who also has Type 1 diabetes, got a golden retriever puppy named Montana when she was about 19. One night Montana would not leave her alone as she slept. “He was crying and pawing at me. I was mad because he woke me up, but once I became aware, I thought maybe I should test my blood sugar. I tested it, and it was low,” Beard says. “I thought it was a fluke, but he started doing it regularly.” Now he wakes her at least twice a month to warn about her falling blood glucose. “He just started doing it on his own, and I reinforce the behavior with treats,” she says. Veterinarian Nicholas Dodman recalls a client who had a German shepherd that was afraid of men, including the woman’s husband. The dog would avoid him even if they were in the same room. But one night, the dog woke him. The man realized that his wife, who had diabetes, was becoming hypoglycemic. After that, if the woman’s blood glucose dropped dangerously low, the dog would overcome his fear and wake up the man to help her. “It was the on Continue reading >>

Diabetic Alert Service Dogs

Diabetic Alert Service Dogs

Service Dogs for Those with Diabetes Type 1 Service dogs can be an extremely important part of someones life who is living with diabetes. A fully formed partnership permits people who have a disability to have a higher level of independence within their lives, as well as better socialization skills, more stability, and a friend constantly by their side to experience lifes amazing moments. The Americans with Disabilities Act affirms that individuals with disabilities have the benefit of having their service dogs with them in public spaces, buildings, and facilities. 1.25 million Americans are living with Diabetes Type 1. This includes about 200,000 individuals less than 20 years old and more than 1 million adults over the age of 20. Each year in the United States there are 40,000 new diagnoses of Diabetes Type 1. It is common for the disease to impair individuals from living their lives due to the numerous symptoms such as extreme weakness, dehydration, nausea, irritability, and mood changes. CPL Alert Dogs offer those with diabetes greater freedom to improve their quality of lifeby alerting ahead of time that a blood sugar decrease is impending. By giving their partners time to take precautions, this helps prevent serious injuries from falls and other related complications. How Do Diabetic Alert Dogs Help Their Partner? Alert Individual if Blood Sugar is Dropping CPL Alert Dogs for Diabetes are trained to detect low or high blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia & hyperglycemia) in their early stages, before the blood sugar levels become too dangerous. The dogs are able to do this through smell. There various distinctodors that accompany different blood sugar levels. In order to train our dogs to help those with diabetes, the future partner will take a sample of their saliva Continue reading >>

Type You Support Group

Type You Support Group

Frequently asked questions about Medical Assistance & Diabetic Alert Dogs What is a Service dog and why does it have special rights for access? Service dogs are individually trained to perform tasks for people with disabilities – such as guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling wheelchairs, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, or performing other special tasks. The Americans with Disabilities Act provides public access rights for these dogs and their disabled handlers. What is the difference between a Medical Assistance Dog, a Diabetic Alert Assistance Dog and a Medical Response Dog? Medical Assistance Dogs are service dogs that have been trained to respond to an identifiable element that is available to their senses in order to support the medical condition of their handler. Diabetic Alert Assistance Dogs are a specific type of Medical Assistance Dog that has been trained to use their highly sensitive scent capabilities to identify the changes in blood chemistry that occur during rapid changes in blood sugar levels. Medical Response Dogs are another type of Medical Assistance Dog that has been trained to assist persons based on recognition of symptoms pertaining to a specific medical condition. The differences between medical alert and medical response training is the trigger that the dog has been trained to identify. In the case of a Diabetic Alert Dog, the trigger is the change in blood chemistry, allowing the diabetic to treat hypoglycemia prior to becoming symptomatic. A Medical Response Dog for diabetes responds to the handler as symptoms are occurring. D4D’s testing and experience with its clients has shown that there is a 15 to 30 minute difference in this response. How can the dog notify its handler when it se Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Diabetic Alert Dogs

What You Need To Know About Diabetic Alert Dogs

Dogs possess an incredibly powerful sense of smell. That’s why we use these impressive animals to detect the presence of drugs, explosives, and other contraband, ultimately helping to keep society safer. Dogs’ sense of smell is also being used to help people with diabetes. A recently published paper found that trained diabetic alert dogs (DADs) were able to detect odors that diabetic individuals produce when in a hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) state. Some experienced DAD trainers suggest that trained dogs can identify changes in a diabetic’s chemistry derived from his breath or sweat 15-30 minutes before it can be detected by traditional intermittent glucose monitoring (the type of monitoring used by most people with diabetes). However, another recently published paper found that there was a high false positive rate of dog alerts in Type 1 diabetics and that the less commonly used continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was able to detect hypoglycemia much earlier. Despite this finding, the same study showed that dog users were very satisfied and largely confident in their dog’s ability to detect hypoglycemia. Once the service dog detects the potential problem, they alert their owner by pawing, barking, or other behaviors. The dog can even be taught to fetch a cell phone for his person. This allows the owner to take the necessary steps and precautions to prevent an issue. He is also taught to alert other people in the household if his owner experiences an issue and cannot respond because he is confused or even unconscious. Such highly trained canines could save many lives. Typical breeds Theoretically, any dog could learn to become a diabetic service dog, but in reality, several breeds dominate the field. These include: Golden retrievers Labrador retrievers Poodles Continue reading >>

Diabetic Alert Dog - 4 Paws For Ability

Diabetic Alert Dog - 4 Paws For Ability

Diabetic Alert Dog, Pip sensing a change in Megans blood sugar There are many tools to use in dealing with diabetes, and the Diabetic Alert Dog is one more tool to add to the toolbox used to help families deal with their child who has diabetes. With the use of a Diabetic Alert Dog the child can gain the independence they need as they grow up and mature and the parents are not afraid to allow them to do so. Here at 4 Paws we place Diabetic Alert Dogs with children who have insulin-dependent Type 1 Diabetes. As with all medical alert dogs, Diabetic Alert Dogs are trained to smell the chemical body changes that occur as the insulin levels increase or drop. When a child is experiencing a high or low, their body is releasing chemicals that change their typical scent. A 4 Paws Dog with the right training in scent-based work is able to respond to those chemical changes, at the onset of the changes long before any adverse medical reactions occur, by alerting the parents or caregivers to the change at its onset. The parents and/or child are then able to check their blood sugar level and take appropriate action. Training Diabetic Alert Dogs for children means that we must train a dog that is unique in its ability to meet the needs of both the child with diabetes and the childs family. Most agencies do not work with children, especially very young children. Here at 4 Paws we have no minimum age requirement and believe strongly in early intervention. In addition to the alert work, these dogs provide a measure of comfort for the child, increased self-esteem and confidence, a distraction during unpleasant medical procedures, and of course companionship. USA WEEKEND recently published an article on Megan Rittingerand her service dog, Pip. Full story . . . Continue reading >>

$25,000

$25,000 "diabetic-alert" Dogs Just Ill-trained Puppies, Suit Claims

By Kate Gibson MoneyWatch May 10, 2018, 5:43 AM $25,000 "diabetic-alert" dogs just ill-trained puppies, suit claims A Virginia business is accused of netting tens of thousands of dollars for "poorly trained puppies" sold nationwide and billed as able to detect life-threatening fluctuations in blood sugar in diabetics. The company, called Service Dogs by Warren Retrievers, misled consumer by selling so-called "diabetic-alert dogs" that in reality were often poorly trained and ill-behaved, making them "little more than incredibly expensive pets," Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring said in a statement . "Our investigation shows that, in many instances, Service Dogs was simply selling a $25,000 pet, leaving customers with a huge bill and no protection against a potentially life-threatening blood sugar situation," added Herring, who filed suit against the company on Tuesday. The company is accused of violating the state's Consumer Protection Act by charging $18,000 to $27,000 for three-month-old Labrador retriever puppies that were unable to perform their supposed duties or even to respond when called. Customers told by that company that they'd get "scent training" support were routinely ignored when they requested assistance, the suit alleges. That scenario reportedly bore out for a Florida mother who sought four-footed protection for her 13-year-old diabetic son. "In hindsight, now, maybe I should have been a little bit smarter, but you're looking for any bit of hope," Jovana Flores told the ABC affiliate WJLA in 2015 . Touting as being able to use their highly attuned sense of smell to detect fluctuations in blood-sugar levels, studies on the effectiveness of diabetic-alert dogs has been less than definitive . Service Dogs by Warren Retrievers claimed its dogs had a Continue reading >>

Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr Diabetic Alert Dogs | Service Dogs By Warren Retrievers

Diabetic Alert Dogs By Sdwr Diabetic Alert Dogs | Service Dogs By Warren Retrievers

Living a balanced life as a Diabetic or diabetes care taker isnt always easy. With the unconditional support of a Diabetic Alert Dog, that balance becomes a possibility. SDWRs alert dogs for diabetics provide the stability, safety and support that more Diabetics desire in their life.SDWR places golden retrievers and labrador retrievers, in EXTREME cases due to doctor-verified allergies, we can also place doodles. As service dog providers, weve seen first hand how Diabetes can affect not only the individual, but his or her family as well. Constant care, a lack of sleep, and unshakable fear from highs and lows are all realities a diabetes care taker faces. Diabetic individuals themselves might have a hard time living life fully, due to the limitations of coping with diabetes. Through SDWRs highly-trained Diabetic Assistance Dogs, thousands of individuals and families lives have been touched. With our service dogs, those struck by invisible illness can find independence from fear and around-the clock care. Having a service dog as a companion promotes freedom, and keeps you safe from hitting sharp highs and lows. As we know, investing in a Diabetic Alert Dog is a solid investment in your mental and physical health. We Train Our Diabetic Alert Dogs To Help With The Following: To fulfill our mission as accessible service dog providers, SDWR does not have any geographic limitations. We service those with invisible illnesses around the world by traveling to each of our clients directly. No travel is ever required by our clients to us. Our program involves every family in our service dog training program for over 1 year to 18 months. Our initial delivery time is 4 5 consecutive days, with each subsequent visit every 90 120 days for durations of 2 4 days. Offering our services o Continue reading >>

There Are 5 Core Foundations Of The Diabetic Alert Dog 101tm Program

There Are 5 Core Foundations Of The Diabetic Alert Dog 101tm Program

1. Stably temperamented dogs. Dogs need to be free from all signs of aggression and anxiety. 2. Affordable training. It shouldnt cost you $25,000 to train your own dog for diabetic alert. There has to be a better way. Thats where the Diabetic Alert Dog 101TM program comes in handy. 3. Ensuring that our dogs are happy and are allowed to be dogs. Some service dog organizations have a 75% drop out rate. Some of these dogs are dropped from the program for being unable to shut down everything that is dog about a dog. We think dogs should be allowed to play with other dogs, that dogs should be allowed to play with a ball or engage in a little telephone pole sniffing every once and a while. What is so wrong with that? We think there has to be a middle ground between robot dogs and ill behaved dogs. 4. Training using strict positive reinforcement methodologies. Dominance methodology creates a confrontational relationship with your dog. Do you really want to train a dog that is supposed to be saving your life in a confrontational manner? No way! If you wouldnt do it to your two year old, why would you do it to your dog? What the Diabetic Alert Dog 101TM training methodology creates is a dog that who thinks you are the sun, moon and the stars, a dog that thinks you are the granter of all good things in their life, a dog that not only enjoys his job but is obsessed over it 5. Creation of a THINKING dog Have you ever had a low blood sugar before? What does it feel like? It seems like the first thing to go is critical thinking skills. What type of dog would you rather have? A dog that you have to tell what to do when you are in a state of brain dysfunction or a dog who assesses the situation a responds to it again and again and again trying to get your attention in many different wa Continue reading >>

Pre Trained Diabetic Alert Dogs Available | Service Dog Academy

Pre Trained Diabetic Alert Dogs Available | Service Dog Academy

Already Trained Dogs Mary McNeight, CPDT-KA, CCS, BGS 2018-01-16T21:06:55+00:00 After the success of a trial diabetic alert dog puppy board and train session during Christmas of 2011 the Service Dog Academy has launched our already trained diabetic alert training program. If you would rather receive a pre trained diabetic alert dog instead of spending the next year going through our train your own diabetic alert dog classes , please fill out the information below and we will get you on our list to be contacted when the program starts. Dogs should be available as soon as March of 2018 and will be for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics over the age of 8. The puppies have been trained from 8 weeks of age in the hands of head trainer Mary McNeight. From 8 weeks of age these dogs will be taken out in public every day, be obedience trained and worked with diabetic alert scent EVERY SINGLE DAY. Dogs will be delivered from anywhere between 8 month to 2 years of age depending on the maturity level of the dog so that they can go through their first fear period in the hands of certified trainer to ensure they are enjoying their jobs and are suitable for service work in public. We are not using the typical puppy raiser training philosophy due to the fact that our success rate is exponentially higher if a service dog candidate lives and trains 24 hours a day 7 days a week with a certified service dog trainer from puppyhood. Since this is such an intense training process, we will only be able to provide anywhere between 4 and 6 dogs per year. Please be aware that purchasing a dog does not mean you will never have to train your dog ever again. You will have to continue training for the rest of your life in order to maintain the dog at the level at which we provide them to you at. These dogs Continue reading >>

Diabetes Alert Dog

Diabetes Alert Dog

Diabetes detection dog Tinker, and his diabetic owner A diabetic alert dog is an assistance dog trained to detect high (hyperglycemia) or low (hypoglycemia) levels of blood sugar in humans with diabetes and alert their owners to dangerous changes in blood glucose levels.[1] This allows their owners to take steps to return their blood sugar to normal, such as using glucose tablets, sugar and carbohydrate rich food. The dog can prompt a human to take insulin.[2] When owners with diabetes begin to experience hypoglycemia, the detection dogs perform a predetermined task (e.g. bark, lay down, sit) to inform the person.[3] Dogs may be directly smelling something related to the abnormal glucose concentration, or may be reacting to the owner's symptoms which are caused by hypoglycemia, such as sweating or shaking.[4] History[edit] The first dog trained to detect hypoglycemia was a Californian dog called Armstrong in 2003.[5] In 2009, a dog named Tinker from Durham City became the first British assistance dog to be officially registered for a type 2 diabetic owner. He was able to give his owner Paul Jackson up to half an hour warning before an attack occurred.[6] Training[edit] Diabetic alert dogs are trained to detect blood glucose changes using the saliva of diabetic patients. The diabetic person collects samples using gauze or dental cotton during a time when their blood sugar is just starting to get too low, or too high. Samples must be collected when the patient has not eaten within 30 minutes, brushed their teeth or used anything with a strong smell such as mouth wash in order to get the strongest scent for diabetes alert. Once the samples are collected, they are frozen and used in training dogs to alert to blood sugar changes. [7][8] Like all service dogs, diabetic respon Continue reading >>

What Is A Diabetic Alert Dog?

What Is A Diabetic Alert Dog?

Can dogs do the same job as advanced medical testing equipment? When it comes to blood glucose meters for diabetes, it appears they can. Thanks to our canine companions incredible sense of smell , diabetic alert dogs can function as blood sugar level detectors. Although dogs cant provide exact measurements like a blood glucose meter, and are not meant to replace them, they can alert their owners when those levels are out of range. Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease affecting the bodys ability to regulate blood sugar levels. It involves the hormone insulin which has the role of controlling the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood stream. Diabetic people either cannot produce insulin or cannot properly use the insulin their body produces. This results in blood sugar levels that are too high, a condition known as hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia results in severe, and sometimes life-threatening complications such as chronic kidney disease, eye diseases that can lead to blindness, nerve damage, and heart attack or stroke. In 2015, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Also, over 30 million Americans were living with the disease. Diabetes has no cure, and requires careful management such as regular monitoring of blood sugar and sometimes treatment with insulin. Unfortunately, although insulin is essential for some diabetics, it can occasionally result in hypoglycemia, a condition where blood sugar levels go too low. Low blood sugar has complications just as dangerous as high blood sugar, making blood sugar monitoring even more critical. Interestingly, low and high sugar levels both release chemicals into the body that have distinct smells. Humans cant detect these odors, but dogs can. So just as a dog can be trained for bomb or drug Continue reading >>

$25k Diabetic Alert Dogs Were Untrained, Un-housebroken Puppies, Lawsuit Says

$25k Diabetic Alert Dogs Were Untrained, Un-housebroken Puppies, Lawsuit Says

Sign up or login to join the discussions! $25K diabetic alert dogs were untrained, un-housebroken puppies, lawsuit says The dogs were said to detect owners low blood sugar, but they werent even housebroken. Dogs supposedly trained to detect and respond to potentially life-threatening blood sugar levels in people with diabetes were, in reality, often untrained, un-housebroken puppies with hefty pricetagscurrently set at $25,000. At least, thats according to a lawsuit filed this week by Attorney General Mark Herring on behalf of the Commonwealth of Virginia. According to the lawsuit, the non-profit company Service Dogs by Warren Retrievers and its owner Charles Warren Jr. made extraordinary claims about their diabetic alert dogs. The company and Warren said that the dogs were highly trained and that their performance was backed by science. The SDWR website advertised the animals as being able to: detect low/high blood sugar levels through scents in skin and breath; retrieve needed food and medications, such as insulin; seek help when required; and even dial 911 in an emergency. Diabetic Alert Dogs are 100% accurate and often alert as much as 20-45 minutes before a meter shows theres even a problem, the company boasted. And customers were promised regular access to trainers as needed to help personalize the dogs' training. For these remarkable tricks and services, SDWR has charged customers anywhere from $18,000 to $27,000 per dog through the years. The current cost is around $25,000, and the company encourages customers to fundraise to help pay for the animals. Virginia has a bone to pick about almost all of that. Though the prices were real, the dogs abilities were not, according to the lawsuit. Customers said they received ready dogs that were not at all trained to det Continue reading >>

What Are Diabetic Alert Dogs (dads)?

What Are Diabetic Alert Dogs (dads)?

Diabetic Alert Dogs — affectionately known as DADs — are service dogs that are trained specifically to assist diabetics. Their primary task as service dogs is to alert diabetics of an oncoming hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic event (low or high blood sugar!) DADs are able to do this by reacting to particular smells that are emitted from the human body due to chemical shifts caused by either hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia (undetected by a human nose). There are various ways that the dog can alert their human of a low or high blood sugar, which all depends on how it is trained. These skills require rigorous training from professional service dog trainers. In addition to being on alert for blood sugar malfunctions, Diabetic Alert Dogs are known to provide a tremendous amount of love and emotional support to its owner, resulting in an increased sense of security and balance in the daily life of someone with Type 1. How can I find my own DAD? Getting a Diabetic Alert Dog of your very own is a process. The first step is to find a legitimate, accredited organization made up of trainers that will assist you in both the acquiring and the training of your new DAD. Alternatively, there are Diabetic Alert Dog Training schools that will assist in the training and development of the dog of your own choosing. After being matched with the right dog for you, you may be asked to provide a “scent collection kit” so that your dog can learn your body chemistry during its training. Home visits are scheduled in order to begin the bonding process. Organizations & Resources How long do I have to wait for my dog? The average wait time for your DAD to be ready to come home with you for good is approximately six months to a year. What is the cost? The exact cost will depend on the particular o Continue reading >>

Service Dogs That Can Monitor Their Owners’ Diabetes

Service Dogs That Can Monitor Their Owners’ Diabetes

Hypoglycemia unawareness is a common — and dangerous — condition that can develop in those with type 1 diabetes. This condition means you don’t experience the symptoms most people do when their blood sugar gets too low. Normal symptoms of low blood sugar include sweating, shaking, or confusion. At very low levels, you may experience seizures, or go into a coma if your blood sugar is too low for too long. One of the solutions for this condition is man’s best friend: a diabetes service dog. Dogs have a naturally heightened sense of smell that makes them excellent hunters. Professional trainers have learned to harness these skills by training dogs to recognize certain smells. These could include the fruity smelling ketones a person’s body produces when they are experiencing a hyperglycemic episode when blood sugar is too high, or the unique scent a person gives off during a hypoglycemic episode when blood sugar is too low. A diabetes service dog isn’t a replacement for checking blood sugar levels. However, it is a safeguard for those who experience episodes low or high blood sugar, especially if they do not have warning symptoms. There are several service dog-training programs across the country. Examples include the National Institute for Diabetic Alert Dogs (NIDAD) and Diabetic Alert Dog University. These organizations train a dog to recognize the difference between certain scents. This includes the scent a person releases when their blood sugar is high or low. According to Dogs 4 Diabetics, there are two different levels of service dogs for people with diabetes. Medical response dogs for diabetes are trained to respond to signs that an owner may be experiencing low blood sugar levels, once they have become symptomatic. A diabetic alert dog, on the other hand Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Alert Dogs Help Sniff Out Low Blood Sugar?

Can Diabetes Alert Dogs Help Sniff Out Low Blood Sugar?

For people with diabetes who take insulin, the risk of losing consciousness from low blood sugar is a constant fear. Devices called continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) can alert wearers to dropping levels, but not everyone has access to them. And even among those who do, some prefer a furrier and friendlier alert option: a service dog with special training to alert owners when their blood sugar reaches dangerously low levels. These dogs are trained in a variety of ways, and although they receive certification, there is no universally accepted test to ensure their competence. Fully trained dogs can cost in the $20,000 range and typically aren't covered by insurance, although some nonprofit organizations can help offset the cost. But as the popularity of diabetes alert dogs to detect hypoglycemia has increased dramatically, their effectiveness is largely unknown, according to Evan Los, a pediatric endocrinologist at Oregon Health & Science University who has studied their use. "Though dog trainers and dog users are generally enthusiastic," he notes. Moreover, it's not clear exactly what the dogs may be detecting. Are they actually "smelling" low blood sugar, or are they reacting to typical hypoglycemia symptoms in their owner, such as sweating or shaking? Two new studies add scent to the trail. One, published in the journal Diabetes Care, suggests that the dogs may be smelling a particular substance in the person's breath that rises as blood sugar falls. But a second study, presented by Los at the recent meeting of the American Diabetes Association in New Orleans, found that although the dogs do appear to detect low blood sugar, they also often alerted owners when they didn't have low blood sugar, and were usually slower than a CGM to alert to actual low blood sugar. Sniff Continue reading >>

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