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When Will Diabetes Type 1 Be Cured

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

9 Diabetes Breakthroughs You Need To Know About

Diabetes is not just one condition - but whether your body is struggling with blood sugar levels due to type 1, or type 2, or even only during pregnancy, it's a serious condition that requires daily care and still doesn't have a cure. But scientists have been working hard to find cures, new treatments, and better management techniques for the millions of people worldwide dealing with diabetes. Here are some of the latest developments you need to know about. 1. Brand new beta cells. Type 1 diabetes develops when a person's immune system wipes out insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. But it turns out that another type of immature beta cell has been hiding in our pancreases all along, and scientists think it might be possible to use these 'virgin beta cells' to restore the functionality of the pancreas. 2. A preventative vaccine. Finnish researchers are about to embark on the first-ever clinical trial for a type 1 diabetes prevention vaccine. While it's not a cure for those who already have the condition, a successful vaccine could potentially prevent thousands of cases each year, as the vaccine targets a virus linked with the development of an autoimmune reaction in the pancreas. 3. A unique transplant. One woman with severe type 1 diabetes has spent a year without insulin injections thanks to an experimental transplant. Doctors implanted insulin-producing cells into a fatty membrane in the stomach cavity, and the success of the operation is paving the way towards more people receiving artificial pancreases. 4. New pancreas tissue. Earlier this year scientists announced that they reversed type 1 diabetes in mice by giving them a transplant of pancreatic tissue. The tissue was grown using stem cells from non-diabetic mice, and the success of this method suggests i Continue reading >>

Targeting A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Targeting A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

How Long Will We Have To Wait? about the book Every person touched by diabetes wants to know when there will be a cure. A lot of work is going on, but what are the chances of a breakthrough? Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes is diaTribe's comprehensive overview of where we are and where we're headed in that search. Rich in detail and written for patients and their families, the report features the latest information on the most promising approaches for curing diabetes. These include immune therapeutics, islet and pancreas transplantation, beta cell regeneration and survival agents, and the artificial pancreas. With an introduction by Dr. Aaron Kowalski of the JDRF, and with concluding remarks by our Editor in Chief, Kelly Close, Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes is essential reading for anyone who wants to know more about what a cure might look like or when it will be available. Although a cure may not be right around the corner, this book lays bare the possibilities of all the exciting research now underway. To buy a copy of Targeting a Cure, visit the ADA's store. critical acclaim "Targeting a Cure for Type 1 Diabetes will give you hope that someday struggling with the management of type 1 diabetes will only be a memory."- Richard M. Bergenstal, MD (Executive Director, International Diabetes Center, Minneapolis, MN) “After reading about Kelly Close and her teams’ incredible journey of discovery, we cannot only continue to dream, but we can open our eyes each morning to a reality that brings us closer, inch by inch, discovery by discovery, to a day when glucose control will be automatic and people with type 1 diabetes will be ‘cured.’”- Francine R. Kaufman, MD (Chief Medical Officer and Vice President, Global Medical, Clinical & Health Affairs, Medtroni Continue reading >>

Scientists May Have Found A Functional Cure For Type-1 Diabetes

Scientists May Have Found A Functional Cure For Type-1 Diabetes

Type-1 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects an estimated 42 million people worldwide, and occurs when the pancreas produces little to no insulin. Those with the condition must take supplemental insulin so their bodies can process sugars. But now, researchers at ViaCyte, a regenerative medicine company, have some good news: They're working on a therapy based on stem cells that can automatically release insulin into the body when it's needed. The treatment is specifically aimed at patients with high-risk type-1 diabetes. ViaCyte estimates that around 140,000 people in the US and Canada suffer from the condition, which can cause life-threatening events. The use of stem cells to replace pancreatic insulin cells has been tried before, but without much success. ViaCyte's approach shows promise because the stem cells can mature within the body itself through an implant the company calls PEC-Direct. There has already been a round of clinical trials to test whether the stem cells could fully grow into the type of cells necessary to produce insulin -- called islet cells. That was a success. But the number of cells within the implants wasn't enough to actually treat the patients; it was solely to test whether the cells could, in fact, be grown. Now, in coordination with JDRF, an organization that funds type-1 diabetes research, ViaCyte has implanted PEC-Directs into two patients as a trial. It's important to note that this isn't a full cure. It's what ViaCyte President and CEO Paul Laikind calls "a functional cure." It doesn't address and treat the specific causes of the condition. Additionally, patients using this treatment would be required to take immunosuppressive drugs to protect the created cells from the body's immune system, according to New Scientist. Regardless, Continue reading >>

Will Diabetes Go Away?

Will Diabetes Go Away?

There is no cure for diabetes. Neither type 1 (juvenile onset or insulin-requiring) diabetes or type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes ever goes away. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period" shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period" diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months to a year. The patient's insulin needs are minimal and some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin. It would be a mistake to assume that the diabetes has gone away, however. Basically, type 1 diabetes occurs when about 90 percent of the body's insulin-producing cells have been destroyed. At the time that type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most patients still are producing some insulin. If obvious symptoms of type 1 diabetes emerge when the patient has an illness, virus or cold, for example, once the illness subsides the body's insulin needs may decrease. At this point, the number of insulin-producing cells remaining may be enough — for the moment — to meet the person's insulin needs again. But the process that has destroyed 90 percent of the insulin-producing cells will ultimately destroy the remaining insulin-producing cells. And as that destruction continues, the amount of injected insulin the patient needs will increase — and ultimately the patient will be totally dependent on insulin injections. Scientists now think that it is important for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to continue taking some insulin by injection even during the honeymoon period. Why? Because they have some scientific evidence to suggest that doing so will help preserve the few remaining insulin-producing cells for a while longer. Patients diagnosed wi Continue reading >>

Dr Bart Roep: The Man Who Wants To Cure Type 1 Diabetes Within Six Years

Dr Bart Roep: The Man Who Wants To Cure Type 1 Diabetes Within Six Years

'The C-word is controversial within diabetes circles, yet the City of Hope had no reticence about making the claim.' - Jack Woodfield. Dr Bart Roep is the director of the diabetes research facilityat the City of Hope's Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute. Born in the Netherlands, he leads a team whose mission is to cure type 1 diabetes, and while their ambitions are lofty, so is their early success. In March, Dr Roep's team published the results of a 14-year-boy with type 1 diabetes who underwent stem cell transplantation. The boy has since been free from insulin without any side effects for eight years. This, Dr Roep said, was the first definitive proof that type 1 diabetes can be cured. But there are still several critical questions to be answered. Dr Roep acknowledges that cure is "a dangerous word to use" in regard to type 1 diabetes research. "What we are trying to do is understand why people get type 1 diabetes and to translate this to find a cure," Roep said. "That is, of course, a dangerous word to use. But we think that we are onto a couple of leads." One of these leads is islet cell transplantation, a procedure that involves transplanting islet (insulin-producing) cells into patients from donor pancreases. In some cases, the transplants can help a patient come off insulin, but other times the cells are rejected or attacked by the immune system unless immunosuppressant drugs are also given, which can cause side effects. Dr Roep's team made a significant discovery along the way: by reading the immune signatures of patients they were able to predict how successful transplantation would be. Dr Roep says this is the first step towards personalising medicine in type 1 diabetes. "It turns out we can predict before surgery who has a fantastic chance of lasting Continue reading >>

Harvard And Mit Close To Cure For Type 1 Diabetes Which Will End Daily Injections

Harvard And Mit Close To Cure For Type 1 Diabetes Which Will End Daily Injections

Harvard and MIT close to cure for Type 1 diabetes which will end daily injections Sufferes of type 1 and type 2 diabetes may have to inject insulin dailyCredit:Alamy A cure for type 1 diabetes is closer than ever after scientists showed they can switch off the disease for six months in animals which would equate to several years in humans. In 2014, researchers at Harvard University discovered how to make huge quantities of insulin-producing cells , in a breakthrough hailed as significant as antibiotics. Now a team at MIT has proven that planting the cells into mice can completely restore insulin function for a long time. "These treatments aim to effectively establish long-term insulin independence and eliminate the daily burden of managing the disease for months, possibly years, at a time" Julia Greenstein JDRF, the type 1 diabetes research charity It could mean the end of daily insulin injections for the 400,000 people in Britain living with Type 1 diabetes. Instead they would simply need a transfusion of engineered cells every few years. Researchers say human trials are just a few years away. We are excited by these results, and are working hard to advance this technology to the clinic, said Dr Daniel Anderson, professor of applied biology at MIT. These results lay the groundwork for future human studies using these formulations with the goal of achieving long-term replacement therapy for type one diabetes. We believe (the cells) have the potential to provide insulin independence for patients suffering from this disease. "It has the potential to provide diabetics with a new pancreas that is protected from the immune system, which would allow them to control their blood sugar without taking drugs. Thats the dream. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that causes Continue reading >>

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

City Of Hope Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes In Six Years

It’s an extraordinary goal powered by an extraordinary gift. City of Hope’s Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute is committed to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D) within six years, fueled by a $50 million funding program led by the Wanek family. It seems an audacious goal for a comprehensive cancer center, but City of Hope has a long history of groundbreaking work in diabetes. Research conducted by City of Hope led to the development of synthetic human insulin, which is still used today by many of the estimated 1.5 million Americans with T1D and 27 million with type 2 diabetes (T2D). “City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge,” said Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer of City of Hope. “This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes.” The funding for the transformative research needed to embark on such an endeavor is led by a gift from the Wanek family, which owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world’s largest home furniture manufacturer. “City of Hope scientists’ research has revolutionized the understanding and treatment of diabetes,” said Todd Wanek, chief executive officer of Ashley Furniture, speaking on behalf of his family. “It continues today as physicians and scientists gain systemic understanding of diabetes as a complex, multifaceted disease.” Through the generosity of the family and gifts from an anonymous donor, City of Hope will be able to devote more than $50 million over the next six years to an unprecedented research effort: The Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes at City of Hope. A Multifaceted Approach The Wanek Family Project will result in the creation of a series of highly focused programs at City of Hope. The Continue reading >>

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years now. The relentlessness of type 1, and the fact that I will probably live with this non-preventable condition for the rest of my life never goes away, but I have almost made peace with it. A few days ago, I saw something that gave me pause. “British man with type 1 diabetes to receive tests after coming off insulin,” read Diabetes.co.uk’s headline. The article goes onto say that, “Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again.” My first thoughts upon reading this were, “this can’t be true,” and “what’s the real explanation here?” There are many types of diabetes including type 2, LADA, and monogenic. Maybe he actually had one of those types instead of type 1. Usually, tests can determine this quickly though, so why was it not the case with Dan? I live in the UK and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. I managed to get in touch with ‘Miracle Dan’, as he’s been called by his friends. Although he is saving the specific details of his recent test results from the U.S. for an upcoming exclusive interview with another media outlet, he spoke to me and answered some of my questions about everything that has been happening. Please tell us a bit about yourself and your diabetes. When were you diagnosed? I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in February 2011 at the age of 23, after just leaving the army. I started a new engineering job and within two weeks of starting, I noticed the traditional symptoms of type 1 diabetes: thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, and a lot of vomiting. I collapsed and was taken by ambulance to hospital where I wa Continue reading >>

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

What If There Was A Cure For Diabetes

Dreaming of a cure for diabetes: Fact or Fiction? With tears in her eyes but a faint smile, Camp Director Maura Prescott, approached the podium. I would like to say that I am overjoyed that we are closing our Diabetes Camp with the announcement from the CDC that Type 1 Diabetes has now been eradicated, and that the services of our camp are no longer needed. I look forward to continuing to work in the diabetes world, but with the older Type 2 population, helping to fine tune their diabetes control with the Bionic Pancreas and increase their quality of life and time on this earth. I have given my life to working with and improving the lives of those with diabetes, and I will continue to do so. By the end of my life, I hope to see that there is not one single person with diabetes on this planet, and that our children and grandchildren are taught about this debilitating chronic illness in history class. We have come so far since the 1920’s, where we saw the discovery of insulin. We have come to the point of cure. Here, in 2056, we can say that on the horizon, we can see a world without diabetes. I stand before you today in awe at the shear genius of scientists who have worked tirelessly in efforts to make this day come. From the introduction of the vaccine for Type 1 diabetes in 2032, we have seen worldwide eradication similar to that seen many years ago with polio. The camp closes because there are no more children with diabetes to attend it, and is that not what we have all been working for? Honestly, I never expected to be able to say those words in my lifetime. But here we are. Tania Prescott read the scribbled notes from her mother’s speech some 25 years before. She had just read a news article online explaining how there are now only a few people left on the earth Continue reading >>

Clinical Trials And The Type 1 Diabetes Cure

Clinical Trials And The Type 1 Diabetes Cure

WRITTEN BY: Stephen Gitelman, MD I am often asked the question, “Where is the cure for Type 1 diabetes (T1D)?” For those with long-standing diabetes, we are very close to replicating insulin producing beta cell functionality or the actual replacement of those cells — either with closed loop systems with continuous glucose sensor driving an insulin pump, or use of replacement beta cells derived from stem cells. However, as a Pediatrician, I think the ultimate cure for T1D will be prevention. Why can’t we screen and predict who is at risk, and then prevent someone from getting Type 1 diabetes in the first place? It turns out that T1D occurs in about 1 in 300 people in the general population, but if you already have someone in your family with diabetes, like a brother or sister, then the risk jumps to a 1 in 20 chance of developing Type 1 diabetes. This is why researchers in an NIH sponsored international research effort called TrialNet have been focusing prevention efforts on families with at least one T1D. T1D results from both underlying genetic risk and environmental exposures, but researchers are still working to determine these specific factors. Thanks to some of this work, we now have the ability to predict who will get T1D, in some cases as long as 10-20 years before it happens (see figure). Researchers use three different pieces of information for prediction. First, we look at the immune system. This is done with a simple blood test, measuring up to five different autoantibodies that the immune system might produce against beta cells. If no abnormality is found, then your risk of developing Type 1 diabetes in the near future is very low. However, if there is any abnormality found in the antibody profile, then additional tests are necessary to further defin Continue reading >>

Us Facility Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes Within Six Years

Us Facility Aims To Cure Type 1 Diabetes Within Six Years

A diabetes research facility in the US has set the goal of curing type 1 diabetes within six years. The City of Hope's Diabetes and Metabolism Research Institute, based in California, is aiming to cure type 1 diabetes using $50 million (£40m) of funding from the Wanek family, who owns Ashley Furniture Industries, the world's largest home furniture manufacturer. City of Hope will be collaborating with the Wanek Family Project for Type 1 Diabetes on the six-year project, using an integrated approach to curing type 1 diabetes. These techniques include: Immunotherapy: Unlocking the immune system's role within diabetes and how stem cell-based therapies could reverse the immune attack on pancreatic beta cells Beta cell transplantation: Improving ways of boosting beta cells and encouraging their long-term survival following transplantation Preventing diabetes complications: Intervening at a genetic level to reverse complications and predict their development Dr Bart Roep, director of City of Hope's research team, says that the key to curing type 1 diabetes will be to understand what causes it to develop. From there, research can begin on treatments, which could vary from person to person. "[It's] something we call personalised medicine or precision medicine, which is very much in vogue in cancer. That means we need to understand where patients differ and then tailor the immune therapies to their specific needs," said Roep. Robert W. Stone, president and chief executive officer at City of Hope, added: "City of Hope is best positioned to take on this challenge. This is thanks to our 40-year institutional legacy of pioneering treatment and research advances in diabetes." City of Hope is an independent research and treatment centre for diabetes, cancer and other life-threatening Continue reading >>

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Image Point Fr/Shutterstock A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes means a lifetime of constant diligence. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 usually develops early in life. Those diagnosed have to check blood sugar several times a day and take insulin as needed; the process is difficult, expensive, and potentially dangerous. That helps explain the excitement about a potential cure for type 1 diabetes using an already approved treatment. Doctors diagnose more than 18,000 children and teens with type 1 diabetes every year, according to the CDC. These kids lack the ability to make enough insulin, the hormone that processes blood sugar. Using insulin injections to control blood sugar with insulin is tricky because diet, exercise, and stress can quickly alter levels. Without enough insulin, kidney, heart, and nerve damage can be the result. Get too much, and blood sugar levels will plummet dangerously low. (This is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes.) Researchers in Israel have tried treating type 1 diabetics with an immune system protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha-1)—it helps target germs. Normally, insulin gets lower and lower over time in diabetics, but extra alpha-1 seems to help the body produce more. Researchers gave 12 recently diagnosed type 1 diabetics an alpha-1 drip once a week for eight weeks in a study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. For a year and counting following treatment, two of the participants have been making more of their own insulin. Another three saw only minor decreases—which is a good sign. “Compared to the natural course of the disease, which is downhill, even a flat line is considered success,” says study co-author Eli C. Lewis, PhD, biochemical and pharmacology professor at Ben-Gurion University of the N Continue reading >>

The Long Road To A Cure

The Long Road To A Cure

Checking blood sugar levels with a finger-stick device. “Well, I hope for the best cause I’m 26 and I’ve been type 1 for like 2 to 3 years. I’ve been looking for a cure and a way out of using needles every day. I will say that it’s made me healthy, but I just want to be the old great person I was before this all came along into my life. … Right now I finally got health insurance from my job and I’m thinking about getting the pump but I just don’t like the idea. Well anyway, I hope the best in your research and for a day that I don’t have to use a pump or needles anymore.” Finding a cure for type 1 diabetes has been a roller-coaster of high hopes and deep disappointments. At the time of the great discovery of insulin, people thought that surely a permanent cure couldn’t be far off? Decade by decade we learned more about this complex disease and how to control it, so that diabetics could live long and productively. Yet close to a century after that great breakthrough, living with type 1 is still a formidable challenge, and the promise of a real cure seems to retreat into the indefinite future. Diabetes is unlike other diseases where the cause is unknown and a cure might not be easily recognized. We know what conditions cause diabetes and we know how to recognize a cure, but still none has been found. In diabetes, the parameters are clearly defined: a therapy that results in normal blood sugars all the time is a cure. This makes it all the more frustrating when the available therapies are so imperfect. What Is a Cure? People define a “cure” for type 1 in different ways. Some insist that the only true cure would be to eliminate the cause—to somehow turn off the immune system malfunction that attacks the insulin-producing beta cells. Much effort i Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Could Modified Blood Stem Cells Lead To A Cure?

Type 1 Diabetes: Could Modified Blood Stem Cells Lead To A Cure?

Increasing levels of a certain protein in blood stem cells so that the immune system stops attacking insulin cells in the pancreas could be a way to halt type 1 diabetes, according to a new study reported in Science Translational Medicine. Researchers led by those at Harvard Medical School's Boston Children's Hospital in Massachusetts found that they could reverse hyperglycemia in diabetic mice by modifying their defective blood stem cells to increase production of a protein called PD-L1. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin. Without sufficient insulin, the body cannot convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy for cells, with the result that it builds up in the bloodstream. Over time, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, leads to serious complications such as vision problems and damage to blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. Immune system attacks beta cells Around 5 percent of the 23.1 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States have type 1 diabetes. The body produces insulin in the pancreas, which is an organ that sits just behind the stomach. It contains insulin-producing beta cells that normally sense glucose levels in the blood and release just the right amount of insulin to keep sugar levels normal. In type 1 diabetes, a fault in the immune system makes inflammatory T cells — which usually react to "foreign" material — attack beta cells in the pancreas. Nobody knows exactly how this comes about, but scientists suspect that a virus, or some other trigger in the environment, sets it off in people with certain inherited genes. The "holy grail" of scientists seeking a cure for type 1 diabetes is to find a way to prevent or stop the immune attack on the beta cells. Several approaches have been tried, including "cytostatic Continue reading >>

Looking To Cure Type 1 Diabetes, Investors Front $114m To Launch A Pioneering Human Study At Semma

Looking To Cure Type 1 Diabetes, Investors Front $114m To Launch A Pioneering Human Study At Semma

Three years ago, Harvard’s Doug Melton published a landmark study outlining how he had successfully used stem cells to create insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells that were inserted in bulk into mice and successfully protected from an immune response — a breakthrough in regenerative medicine that bore real promise to provide a curative approach for Type 1 diabetes that could conceivably end a lifetime of insulin shots. It was the culmination of 23 years of lab work, launched when his son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. And that achievement marked the beginning of something new in biotech. That same year Semma Therapeutics would be launched — with a $44 million A round landing in 2015 — in pursuit of a mission to complete one of the most ambitious preclinical programs in the regenerative med field. And after working on all the nitty gritty research needed to see if this tech could be scaled up to human size, an expanded syndicate of venture investors have put together a whopping $114 million round with plans to take this into humans for a first-of-its-kind proof-of-concept study. One of the big challenges Semma faced in scaling up, Melton tells me, was to create a membrane specifically designed with pores that were large enough for molecules to pass through but too small for immune cells to penetrate. Using some calculations from the lab, Melton and his colleagues estimated that they would need some 150 million cells — possibly ranging up to three times that amount — in order to provide the natural insulin needed to eliminate the shots. Melton compares the membrane to a tea bag, but one that couldn’t be overloaded. The replacement cells, he said, “will only secrete the right amount depending on the level of sugar in the blood.” The big round mark Continue reading >>

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