diabetestalk.net

When To Take Diabetes Medications

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Check with your provider; usually taken once a day. Combines the actions of each pill used in the combination. Side effects are the same as those of each pill used in the combination. Some combinationpills may lead to low blood glucose levels if one of the medications contained in the combination has this effect. May decrease the number of pills you need to take. Other drugs are on the horizon as well, as scientists work to improve the variety of medications to treat type 2 diabetes. Frequently physicians will prescribe one type of oral medication and discover it isn't really helping to control blood glucose that much. In the past, this would have meant that the patient would likely be put on insulin. Now, physicians can try another type of medication to see if it helps correct problems. Physicians often notice that a particular medication works well for a period of time and then begins to work less well for a patient. Now they can mix and match medications that work on different aspects of the diabetes problem to see if that will improve blood glucose control. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications

Diabetes Medications

While making lifestyle changes can go a long way in managing diabetes, as well as related conditions such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, your doctor may prescribe medications depending on your health needs. Your diabetes treatment plan may include insulin, oral diabetes medication or a combination approach, as determined by your doctor. In some cases, patients may require multiple-drug therapy if they have additional cardiovascular risk factors with diabetes. Adherence to your medication plan is very important. Insulin The pancreas normally secretes a hormone called insulin, which helps the body's cells take in glucose from the blood to use it for energy. When functioning as it should, the pancreas produces the ideal amount of insulin. In people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn't produce insulin. People with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies do not use it properly. Over time people with type 2 diabetes may produce less insulin as well. Insulin may be prescribed for both types of diabetes to help regulate blood glucose so the body can work properly. There are many types of insulin on the market, all of which must be injected into the fat under the skin in order for it to reach the bloodstream. (Insulin is not currently available in pill form because it would be broken down during the digestive process.) Injections can be done using a: Syringe: A needle connected to a hollow tube that holds the insulin and a plunger that pushes the insulin down into and through the needle Insulin pen: A device that looks like a pen and holds insulin but has a needle for its tip Insulin pump: A small machine (worn on a belt or kept in a pocket) that holds insulin, pumps it through a small plastic tube and through a tiny needle inserted under the skin w Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Tweet Diabetes medications are a common form of treatment for people with diabetes. There are many different types of diabetes medicines, or anti-diabetic drugs, and this includes insulin, which has its own area within the site. Whilst each drug is unique in the way it works to help patients with diabetes keep their condition under control, some act similarly to one other and are grouped in the same class of drugs. The way in which they are administered can also differ, with some medicines taken orally and others injected directly into the blood. Are diabetes drugs suitable for all diabetics? Most diabetes drugs are designed for people with type 2 diabetes who are unable to control their blood sugar levels through strict diet and exercise alone. But some, such as metformin, are sometimes taken alongside insulin treatment for people with type 1 diabetes. Medication guides Explore the 18 most common medications for diabetes: Assists insulin in controlling post-meal glucose levels. Can more than one drug be taken at the same time? Depending on individual circumstances, a GP may prescribe more than one anti-diabetic drug to help treat a patient’s diabetes. Watch the video below for more information on the types of diabetes medication available. What are the side effects of anti-diabetic medicines? As with any type of medication, blood glucose-lowering drugs can have a number of side effects. These potentially harmful effects are listed in the patient information leaflet that accompanies the medication, so make sure you check this before starting your drug treatment. You may not experience any of the adverse effects listed, but if you do, consult your doctor and/or diabetes care team as they may be able to suggest another suitable medication for your condition. They will a Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Help You Take Your Diabetes Medications On Time

10 Tips To Help You Take Your Diabetes Medications On Time

10 Tips to Help You Take Your Diabetes Medications on Time To keep your blood sugar levels controlled, it's vital to take your diabetes medications as prescribed. Follow these strategies to ensure you take them on time, every time. A pill box is just one of the many handy ways to make taking diabetes meds easier. When Carol Gee, 67, of Stone Mountain, Georgia, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes nine years ago, she implemented a system to take her medications and never once veered off course. A retired inventory management specialist in the military and a teacher, Gee was familiar with the efficacy of regimens, so she knew sticking to a schedule would help ensure she would always take her diabetes medications as prescribed. In the morning after she wakes up, showers, and brushes her teeth, Gee immediately takes Metformin (glucophage ), Victoza (liraglutide) , and a medication for high blood pressure. Depending on her fasting blood sugar, shell also take fast-acting insulin and eat within 15 minutes. At night, after she brushes her teeth, shell repeat the same process but replaces the fast-acting insulin with a long-lasting insulin. Ive always been organized, and I believe that organization is also important when youre taking medication, she says, explaining that practice and repetition have enabled her to follow the plan. Thanks to this routine, Gee is the exception: Between 38 and 93 percent of people with diabetes struggle to take their medications, according to a review published in June 2015 in Diabetes Medicine . Obstacles to Taking Diabetes Meds on Time If youre taking medication for diabetes whether its pills or injections it can be challenging to do it exactly the way your doctor prescribed and on the same schedule every day. If you take more than one medication Continue reading >>

3 Answers - What Is The Best Time To Take A Medicine For Diabetes? - Quora

3 Answers - What Is The Best Time To Take A Medicine For Diabetes? - Quora

What is the best time to take a medicine for diabetes? It is advisable to take the dose of your diabetes medicines as prescribed by your doctor. Some people require to take the medicine once in a day and same are advised to take it twice, depending on their condition. Mostly diabetes medications are taken with or before a meal. Type 2 diabetes treatment involves medicines that are taken twice in a day are usually eaten in the morning with breakfast and in the evening with dinner. These medicines help in decreasing the amount of glucose that is released from the liver. Some diabetes medicines that are taken with meals also help in stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin in the body. Your doctor may recommend you to skip the medicine if you skip the meal. If a patient does not eats a meal after having the diabetes medicine, he or she may suffer from hypoglycaemia. This is a condition in which the blood glucose level decreases to a great extent. The patient then has to consume at least 10 to 15 grams of carbohydrate to normalize the blood glucose level in the body. If the condition still doesnt improves, then the body must be given more 15 grams carbohydrates. Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

What Oral Medications Are Available for Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes results when the body is unable to produce the amount of insulin it needs to convert food into energy or when it is unable to use insulin appropriately. Sometimes the body is actually producing more insulin than is needed by a person to keep blood glucose in a normal range. Yet blood glucose remains high, because the body's cells are resistant to the effects of insulin. Physicians and scientists believe that type 2 diabetes is caused by many factors, including insufficient insulin and insulin resistance. They increasingly believe that the relative contribution each factor makes toward causing diabetes varies from person to person. It is important to know the name of your diabetes medicine (or medicines), how it is taken, the reasons for taking it and possible side-effects. Diabetes Pills How to Take How They Work Side Effects Of Note Biguanides Metformin (Glucophage) Metformin liquid ( Riomet) Metformin extended release (Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Glumetza) Metformin: usually taken twice a day with breakfast and evening meal. Metformin extended release: usually taken once a day in the morning. Decreases amount of glucose released from liver. Bloating, gas, diarrhea, upset stomach, loss of appetite (usually within the first few weeks of starting). Take with food to minimize symptoms. Metformin is not likely to cause low blood glucose. In rare cases, lactic acidosis may occur in people with abnormal kidney or liver function. Always tell healthcare providers that it may need to be stopped when you are having a dye study or surgical procedure. Sulfonylureas Glimepiride (Amaryl) Glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase) Glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Micronized glyburide (Glynase) Take with a meal once or twice Continue reading >>

Should I Use Diabetes Pills Or Insulin?

Should I Use Diabetes Pills Or Insulin?

Diabetes affects the way your body breaks down food. Treatment depends on which type of diabetes you have. In type 1 diabetes, your pancreas stops producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate glucose, or sugar, in your blood. Type 2 diabetes starts with insulin resistance. Your pancreas no longer produces enough insulin or doesn’t use it efficiently. Every cell in your body uses glucose for energy. If insulin isn’t doing its job, glucose builds up in your blood. This causes a condition called hyperglycemia. Low blood glucose is called hypoglycemia. Both can lead to serious complications. A variety of pills are available to treat diabetes, but they can’t help everyone. They only work if your pancreas still produces some insulin. They can’t treat type 1 diabetes. They aren’t effective in people with type 2 diabetes when the pancreas has stopped making insulin. Some people with type 2 diabetes can benefit from using both pills and insulin. Some pills to treat diabetes include: Biguanides Metformin (Glucophage, Fortamet, Riomet, Glumetza) is a biguanide. It lowers the amount of glucose in your liver and boosts insulin sensitivity. It may also improve cholesterol levels and might help you lose a little weight. People normally take it twice per day with meals. You can take the extended-release version once per day. Potential side effects include: upset stomach nausea bloating gas diarrhea a temporary loss of appetite It may also cause lactic acidosis in people with kidney failure, but this is rare. Sulfonylureas Sulfonylureas are fast-acting medications that help the pancreas release insulin after meals. They include: People usually take these medications once per day with a meal. Potential side effects include: irritability low blood glucose upset st Continue reading >>

Taking Medication

Taking Medication

Like many people with diabetes, you may need to take medication to help keep your blood sugar (glucose) level steady. Diabetes increases your risk for other health conditions, such as heart or kidney related problems, so you may need to take medicine to help with those, too. Medications you may need to take for your diabetes include: Insulin, a hormone that helps your body use or store the food (carbs) you eat for energy Medications that that help your body release or use insulin better Anti-hypertensives, which lower blood pressure Statins, which lower cholesterol Aspirin, which lowers your risk of heart attack Vaccinations, including influenza and pneumonia, which help you stay healthy Because each medication can affect how the others work or cause other problems, it’s important to tell your doctor about all of the medications you are taking, including over-the-counter medications, dietary supplements, vitamins and herbs. A diabetes educator can play an important role in helping you with your medicines. After receiving the prescriptions from your doctor, talk to a diabetes educator and consider asking these questions: Medication tips: Don’t forget – To be sure you take your medication at the right time every day, time it to other daily activities (such as brushing your teeth or eating breakfast), or set your cell phone or watch alarm to remind you. Rotate your sites – If you inject insulin, rotate the sites every day from the fattier part of your upper arm to outer thighs to buttocks to abdomen. Otherwise, you can get lumps under the skin, making it harder for your body to absorb the insulin. You can also download a flyer on taking medication – including sample questions about things you should know about your medication and ask your doctor – here: Continue reading >>

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

Diabetes is a condition that leads to high levels of blood glucose (or sugar) in the body. This happens when your body can’t make or use insulin like it’s supposed to. Insulin is a substance that helps your body use the sugar from the food you eat. There are two different types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. People with both types of diabetes need medications to help keep their blood sugar levels normal. The types of drugs that can treat you depend on the type of diabetes you have. This article gives you information about drugs that treat both types of diabetes to help give you an idea of the treatment options available to you. Insulin Insulin is the most common type of medication used in type 1 diabetes treatment. It’s also used in type 2 diabetes treatment. It’s given by injection and comes in different types. The type of insulin you need depends on how severe your insulin depletion is. Options include: Short-acting insulin regular insulin (Humulin and Novolin) Rapid-acting insulins Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulins Combination insulins NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine-insulin aspart) Humalog Mix 75/25 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humalog Mix 50/50 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humulin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Novolin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Ryzodeg (insulin degludec-insulin aspart) Amylinomimetic drug Pramlintide (SymlinPen 120, SymlinPen 60) is an amylinomimetic drug. It’s an injectable drug used before meals. It works by delaying the time your stomach takes to empty itself. It reduces glucagon secretion after meals. This lowers your blood sugar. It also reduces appetite through a central mechanism. Most medications for type 2 diabetes are o Continue reading >>

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments

Taking insulin or other diabetes medicines is often part of treating diabetes. Along with healthy food choices and physical activity, medicine can help you manage the disease. Some other treatment options are also available. What medicines might I take for diabetes? The medicine you take will vary by your type of diabetes and how well the medicine controls your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar. Other factors, such as your other health conditions, medication costs, and your daily schedule may play a role in what diabetes medicine you take. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin because your body no longer makes this hormone. You will need to take insulin several times during the day, including with meals. You also could use an insulin pump, which gives you small, steady doses throughout the day. Type 2 diabetes Some people with type 2 diabetes can manage their disease by making healthy food choices and being more physically active. Many people with type 2 diabetes need diabetes medicines as well. These medicines may include diabetes pills or medicines you inject under your skin, such as insulin. In time, you may need more than one diabetes medicine to control your blood glucose. Even if you do not take insulin, you may need it at special times, such as during pregnancy or if you are in the hospital. Gestational diabetes If you have gestational diabetes, you should first try to control your blood glucose level by making healthy food choices and getting regular physical activity. If you can’t reach your blood glucose target, your health care team will talk with you about diabetes medicines, such as insulin or the diabetes pill metformin, that may be safe for you to take during pregnancy. Your health care team may start you on diab Continue reading >>

What Time Of Day Is Best To Take Diabetic Medication?

What Time Of Day Is Best To Take Diabetic Medication?

The best time to take your diabetic medication will vary depending on the medicine you're taking. For example, among pills for diabetes, some are meant to be taken before a meal, some at the first bite of a meal and some with food. Some are taken twice a day while others might be taken three times daily. Insulin may be taken as injections a few times a day or given by pump as a steady dose throughout the day. You and your doctor need to choose not only the best medications for controlling your diabetes, but also the best times to take those medications. If your doctor didn’t give you any specific instructions, or if you are confused, look at the bottle and the info sheet from the pharmacy. There are a few meds that need to be taken at certain times for maximum effectiveness or for comfort. For instance, the diabetes drug metformin gives some people nausea when taken on an empty stomach, but rarely causes trouble when taken with meals; while the diabetes medication Starlix needs to be taken right before a meal to work right. For the most part, however, most diabetes drugs have no special timing, so the best time to take them is whenever it will be easiest for you, or when you will be most likely to remember them. Two other non-diabetes drugs that are common to those of us with diabetes are statins for lowering cholesterol and thyroid meds. Statins should be taken in the evening, as most cholesterol is produced by the liver when we sleep and taking the med at bedtime maximizes its effect. Thyroid meds should be taken on an empty stomach, first thing in the morning, without any other pills. Questions Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used fo Continue reading >>

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Every Day

Taking Care Of Your Diabetes Every Day

There are four things you need to do every day to lower high blood sugar: Eat healthy food Get regular exercise Take your diabetes medicine Test your blood sugar If you have diabetes, you should try to keep your blood sugar level as close as possible to that of someone who doesn’t have diabetes. This may not be possible or right for everyone. Check with your doctor about what the right range of blood sugar is for you. You will get plenty of help in learning how to do this from your health care team, which is made up of your doctor, nurses, and dietitian. Bring a family member or friend with you when you see your doctor. Ask lots of questions. Before you leave, be sure you understand everything you need to know about taking care of your diabetes. Eat Healthy Food The foods on your diabetes eating plan are the same ones that are good for everyone. Try to stick to things that are low in fat, salt, and sugar and high in fiber, like beans, fruits, vegetables, and grains. Eating right will help you: Reach and stay at a weight that is good for you Keep your blood sugar in a good range Prevent heart and blood vessel disease Ask your doctor for the name of a dietitian who can work with you on an eating plan for you and your family. Your dietitian can help you plan meals with foods that you and your family like and that are good for you. If You Use Insulin Give yourself an insulin shot. Eat about the same amount of food each day at about the same time. Don't skip meals, especially if you’ve already given yourself an insulin shot. Your blood sugar may go too low. If You Don't Use Insulin Follow your meal plan. Don't skip meals, especially if you take diabetes pills. Your blood sugar may go too low. Skipping a meal can make you eat too much at the next meal. It may be better to Continue reading >>

When To Take Diabetes Medicines: Diabetes Questions & Answers

When To Take Diabetes Medicines: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Q. I have Type 2 diabetes, and I currently take 1,000 milligrams (mg) of metformin twice a day, 5 mg of Onglyza (saxagliptin) once a day, and 5 mg of glipizide once a day. Does it matter when I take the Onglyza and the glipizide? I used to take them both at breakfast, but I thought I might get better blood-glucose-lowering coverage if I took one of them with lunch and one with dinner. A. A couple of factors determine the optimal timing of medicine doses. Some drugs, such as rapid-acting insulin, are usually taken just before meals, and others must be taken on an empty stomach or with food. The way a drug works in the body, as well as the time it takes to start working and the duration of its action, may also determine the best time to take a medicine. Glipizide begins working in approximately 30 minutes to an hour. Since this drug increases insulin secretion, it is recommended that you take it before meals to reduce the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. If you take it only once a day, it’s best to do so prior to the largest meal of the day, or with breakfast. Saxagliptin starts working within hours and only achieves peak concentrations in the body after several hours. Saxagliptin, and other agents in the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor class, prevent the breakdown of a hormone called glucagon-like peptide (GLP) in response to the extra glucose in your blood after you eat, which increases the body’s insulin production. Although concentrations of GLP and other similar hormones are higher after eating, they are also released throughout the day under normal circumstances. So saxagliptin and other DPP-4 inhibitors can be taken without regard to meals. Another factor to consider when determining when to take your diabetes medicines is how well you can follow the reg Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Fact Sheet

Oral Diabetes Medications Fact Sheet

Summa Health System developed this fact sheet for patients who need to take oral medicine to manage their diabetes. Care providers give it to patients during diabetes planned visits, and it is part of the Diabetes Planned Visit Notebook. Oral Diabetes Medications Family Medicine Center of Akron Copyright © 2006 American Diabetes Association Adapted from the ADA Patient Information The first treatment for type 2 diabetes is often meal planning for blood glucose (sugar) control, weight loss, and exercising. Sometimes these measures are not enough to bring blood glucose levels down near the normal range. The next step is taking a medicine that lowers blood glucose levels. How they work In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are too high. These high levels occur because glucose remains in the blood rather than entering cells, where it belongs. But for glucose to pass into a cell, insulin must be present and the cell must be "hungry" for glucose. People with type 1 diabetes don't make insulin. For them, insulin shots are the only way to keep blood glucose levels down. People with type 2 diabetes tend to have two problems: they don't make quite enough insulin and the cells of their bodies don't seem to take in glucose as eagerly as they should. All diabetes pills sold today in the United States are members of five classes of drugs: sulfonylureas, meglitinides, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. These five classes of drugs work in different ways to lower blood glucose levels. Can diabetes pills help me? Only people with type 2 diabetes can use pills to manage their diabetes. These pills work best when used with meal planning and exercise. This way you have three therapies working together to lower your blood glucose levels. Diabetes pills Continue reading >>

More in diabetes