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When To See A Doctor For Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Testing

Diabetes Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Testing

Thanks to the way diabetes is dramatized on television and in movies, many associate it with its more dramatic symptoms. Many think of the weakness and confusion that comes with a hypoglycemic episode, or the disabilities, like vision and circulation problems, associated with uncontrolled blood sugar. Some may even associate obesity with Type II diabetes. Not everyone with diabetes knows they have it, however. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), more than a quarter of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. If you suspect you have diabetes, or are worried that someone in your life may have the illness, you should certainly watch out for symptoms, and if you see persistent signs of diabetes, you should seek a definitive diagnosis. The greatest threat diabetes poses is the damage that high blood sugar does to a person’s health over time, and the best treatment seeks to keep blood sugar at a healthy level. Left undiagnosed, high blood sugar will gradually degrade a person’s health. But once it’s diagnosed, a diabetic can begin to safeguard their lives against the disease. Symptoms of Diabetes How do people know if they have diabetes? Many of them don’t know, and they’re walking around with an undetected and untreated health problem. Even if you don’t have any diabetes symptoms, it’s important for you to have your blood sugar tested with your yearly checkup, just to be sure your blood sugar numbers are still in a good range. If you do see the following symptoms—in yourself, or in one of your loved ones—you should see a doctor as soon as possible. All of these symptoms can have causes besides diabetes, but no matter what, it’s important to find out what the cause is so it can be treated appropriately. Because everyone is different, Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Symptoms You Shouldn’t Ignore

7 Diabetes Symptoms You Shouldn’t Ignore

Blood sugar that’s consistently out of whack increases your risk of health problems throughout your body, including your heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Resulting complications could lead to disabling, even life-threatening, conditions — and that’s why, if you have type 2 diabetes, practicing good diabetes management and maintaining blood sugar control is a must. Being aware of possible complications and their symptoms is one of the first steps to successfully managing diabetes, says Gerald Bernstein, MD, director of the diabetes management program at Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital in New York City. Educating yourself may help you delay or prevent complications from happening. Start here, by reading about seven signs of diabetes complications that should never be ignored. Confusion, dizziness, and shakiness. These symptoms are often a sign of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). “People describe it as feeling nervous or anxious,” says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Blood sugar is usually considered low when it falls below 70. If left untreated, blood sugar that goes too low could cause you to pass out and need emergency medical treatment. If you feel any of the symptoms of hypoglycemia, check your blood sugar. If your number is less than 70, eat 15 grams of carbohydrate such as 3 glucose tablets, 4 ounces of orange juice, or 2 tablespoons of raisins. Wait 15 minutes and then check your blood sugar again. If it hasn’t gone above 70, eat 15 more grams of carbohydrate, wait 15 minutes, and recheck your blood sugar. If you continue to experience symptoms, call your doctor or seek medical treatment. Zanini advises carrying hard candy or glucose tablets with you so you can react as soon as you feel you Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes Symptoms: Early Signs, Advanced Symptoms, And More

Diabetes symptoms may occur when blood sugar levels in the body become abnormally elevated. The most common symptoms of diabetes include: increased thirst increased hunger excessive fatigue increased urination, especially at night blurry vision Symptoms can vary from one person to the next. They also depend on which type of diabetes you have. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes tend to begin abruptly and dramatically. Type 1 diabetes is most often seen in children, adolescents, and young adults. However, type 1 diabetes can develop at any age. In addition to the symptoms listed above, people with type 1 diabetes may notice a quick and sudden weight loss. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. Although it primarily develops in adults, it’s beginning to be seen more frequently in younger people. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include being overweight, being sedentary, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 2 diabetes don’t experience any symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms are slow to develop. Oftentimes, your symptoms may seem harmless. The most common symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst and fatigue, are often vague. When experienced on their own, symptoms such as these may not be anything to worry about. If you’re experiencing one or more of these symptoms, you should speak with your doctor about being screened for diabetes. Frequent thirst You’ve had glass after glass of water, but you still feel like you need more. This is because your muscles and other tissues are dehydrated. When your blood sugar levels rise, your body tries to pull fluid from other tissues to dilute the sugar in your bloodstream. This process can cause your body to dehydrate, prompting you to drink more water. Frequent urination Drinking excessive amou Continue reading >>

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes symptoms Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90% of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. "Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don't know it," says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, see your doctor. Watch the video: 5 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Increased urination, excessive thirst If you need to urinate frequently—particularly if you often have to get up at night to use the bathroom—it could be a symptom of diabetes. The kidneys kick into high gear to get rid of all that extra glucose in the blood, hence the urge to relieve yourself, sometimes several times during the night. The excessive thirst means your body is trying to replenish those lost fluids. These two symptoms go hand in hand and are some of "your body's ways of trying to manage high blood sugar," explains Dr. Collazo-Clavell. Weight loss Overly high blood sugar levels can also cause rapid weight loss, say 10 to 20 pounds over two or three months—but this is not a healthy weight loss. Because the insulin hormone isn't getting glucose into the cells, where it can be used as energy, the body thinks it's starving and starts breaking down protein from the muscles as an alternate source of fuel. The kidneys are also working overtime to eliminate the excess sugar, and this leads to a loss of calories (and can harm the kidneys). "These are processes that require a lot of energy," Dr. Collazo-Clavell notes. "You create a calorie deficit." Hunger Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Signs And Symptoms - Healthxchange

Diabetes: Signs And Symptoms - Healthxchange

Dr Teh Ming Ming, Senior Consultant from The Department of Endocrinology at Singapore General Hospital, a member of SingHealth group, shares the signs and symptoms of diabetes. through increased urination is one sign of diabetes. Early symptoms of diabetes may not be obvious, orthere may not be any symptoms at all. Some of the symptoms of diabetes are listed below. You may want to consider seeing your doctor to find out whether you have diabetes if you have some of the following symptoms. What are the signs and symptoms of diabetes? Excessive thirst and urination are classic symptoms of diabetes. When you have diabetes, there is too much glucose in your blood. Your kidneys usually filter glucose, but most of the glucose is reabsorbed, so that in those without diabetes, no glucose appears in the urine. But if the blood glucose levels are too high, the kidneys are unable to keep up and excess glucose will appear in the urine, explains Dr Teh Ming Ming , Senior Consultant, at the Department of Endocrinology , Singapore General Hospital (SGH), a member of the SingHealth group. Glucose excretion into the urine will also draw out water into the urine. This increases urination and leads to dehydration, with more thirst to compensate for this fluid loss. This can be due to many factors. Dehydration as a result of increased urination can cause fatigue. Moreover, the bodys inability to use sugar for energy needs can cause fatigue. Uncontrolled diabetes with high bloodglucose levelscan lead toweight loss. This is because you lose glucose (and therefore calories) through your urine. High levels of bloodglucose pulls the fluid from the lenses of your eyes. This can affect the ability to focus. In addition, uncontrolled diabetes for prolonged periods of time can cause significant da Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms To Never Ignore

Diabetes Symptoms To Never Ignore

One of the keys to leading a healthy life with diabetes is to keep your glucose levels, or blood sugar, in check. As your main source of energy, glucose plays a big role in keeping your body working like it should. If you have either type of diabetes, you need to be aware of symptoms that may mean your glucose is out of balance. If your blood sugar is too low: Symptom: Acting Drunk or Losing Consciousness Your brain can be affected if your sugar level drops too low. Low glucose can cause you to stagger, slur words, or even pass out. What to do: It's smart to wear a medical bracelet or necklace that lets people know you have diabetes. If your blood sugar gets too low, taking in about 15 to 20 grams of a simple carb may help. Some examples are a half a cup of orange juice, 2 tablespoons of raisins, or a tablespoon of sugar. Glucose tablets and gel tubes are also available. Some people keep an injectable hormone called glucagon on hand and tell their friends how to give them the shot in case they faint or can’t swallow. Ask your doctor if keeping glucagon on hand is right for you. If you can, check your fingerstick 15 minutes after 15 grams of sugar. If you are still low (less than 70 or less than 100 with symptoms), eat another round of carbs. When your blood sugar returns to your target range, eat a meal or snack to prevent if from dropping again. If you've gone 3 rounds and your sugar is still low, or your symptoms persist, call 911. Always let your doctor know if you've had an episode of low blood sugar. Your treatment plan may have to be adjusted. If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High: High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, usually causes its damage slowly over time. But there are some instances when more urgent care is needed. If you have any of the following symptoms, chec Continue reading >>

If You Suspect Diabetes

If You Suspect Diabetes

What If You Do Nothing? If untreated, either type of diabetes will lead to abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood (hyperglycemia). In the case of type 1 diabetes, this can quickly become an emergency. Letting type 2 diabetes go uncontrolled will eventually precipitate a number of serious long-term complications, including cardiac and other vascular diseases, hypertension, stroke, and diseases of the eyes, nerves, and kidneys. Home Remedies for Diabetes Mellitus There are no home remedies, per se, for diabetes. Lifestyle measures, especially exercise and dietary modifications, play a crucial role in controlling diabetes, but anyone diagnosed with the disorder should be under the care of a physician. Your doctor needs to monitor the progress of your symptoms, be alert to possible complications from diabetes, prescribe appropriate medications, and instruct you in the use of those medications. At the same time, the most intelligent step a person with diabetes can take is to become well educated about the condition. The American Diabetic Association and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases are excellent starting points for information. In addition, your doctor or health plan may refer you to a diabetes educator - a specialist who is skilled in teaching you about healthful eating, exercise, medications, insulin administration, and overall psychological adjustment. Beyond Home Remedies: When To Call Your Doctor You need to call your doctor if you experience any of the symptoms of diabetes, especially a sudden or gradual increase in hunger, thirst, or urine output. If you have diabetes, you should contact your doctor if you contract an illness with fever and chills, such as flu, urinary infections, dental infections, or wintertime bronchi Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 7 Symptoms You Don’t See

Diabetes: 7 Symptoms You Don’t See

African Americans have the highest rate of diabetes, but get this: it’s a preventable disease. We can actually win the fight against it. Genetic traits, the prevalence of obesity, and insulin resistance all contribute to the risk of diabetes in the African American community. African Americans also have a high rate of diabetic complications, because of poor glycemic control and racial disparities in health care in the USA. As with most preventable diseases, if you catch them early, then you have a better chance of survival and possibly reversing the disease. Here are symptoms you may not know, but are indicators in pinpointing the disease: You Have To Go To The Bathroom More When you have diabetes, your body becomes less efficient at breaking food down into sugar, so you have more sugar sitting in your bloodstream, says Dobbins. Your body gets rid of it by flushing it out in the urine. That’s why you’re going to the bathroom a lot. Most patients aren’t necessarily aware of how often they use the bathroom But one red flag is whether the need to urinate keeps you up at night. Once or twice might be normal, but if it’s affecting your ability to sleep, that could be a symptom to pay attention to. You’re More Thirsty Urinating a lot will also make you feel parched. A common symptom Dobbins sees with patients is that they use drinks like juices, soda, or chocolate milk to quench their thirst. These sugary beverages then pack the bloodstream with excess sugar, which can lead to the problem all over again. You’re Moody and Grumpy When your blood sugar is out of whack, you just don’t feel well and might become more short-tempered. In fact, high blood sugar can mimic depression-like symptoms. You feel very tired, you don’t feel like doing anything, you don’t w Continue reading >>

When To See Doctor

When To See Doctor

Early on in the course of prediabetes and diabetes, the fact is that the signs and symptoms can be very subtle and very easily missed. While there is lots going on in your body’s cells, tissues and organs, often there is very little along the lines of signs and symptoms. If you have any of the risk factors for diabetes (see below), yearly check-ups can be critically important for your health. Technically, signs are objective measured characteristics such as blood glucose levels while symptoms are subjective evidence of a disorder or disease. Symptoms may be pain, frequent thirst and fatigue. Early Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes Early diabetes is known as insulin resistance which can proceed to pre-diabetes. Not everyone exhibits these signs and symptoms. If you have any of the risk factors for diabetes, it would be a good idea to stay alert for any of the symptoms. A condition known as acanthosis nigricans, a darkening of the skin, particularly at the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and at the knuckles. If you notice any of this skin darkening, call your physician or dermatologist. This can signal prediabetes or diabetes. Increased thirst and more frequent urination. If you notice that you are more often thirsty and use the bathroom even more frequently than you might expect, make an appointment with your physician. Blurry vision is often a later sign of diabetes, but in some, it may occur early. If you notice any blurry vision, see your ophthalmologist or call your physician. You should also get your eyes checked by an optometrist to see if you need glasses or a new prescription. The factors or characteristics that you should be aware put you at a higher risk for prediabetes and diabetes include:1 Obesity or being overweight. This is generally meant as having a “Body Continue reading >>

10 Common Symptoms Of Diabetes You Need To Know

10 Common Symptoms Of Diabetes You Need To Know

Phil is an Editor at LittleThings. He loves writing and the outdoors. You can often find him at the movies or the park. According to the American Diabetes Association, 29.1 million Americans had diabetes in 2012. But of those 29.1 million, only 21 million were aware of their diagnosis. A shocking 8.1 million people went undiagnosed entirely. Now, I know my body better than anybody else. So I am always paying attention for any signs or symptoms that something major might be wrong . But when I heard howmany Americans had diabetes and werent aware of it yet, I knew I had to find out exactly what the symptoms were. Just like paying attention for symptoms of cancer , looking out for the signs of pre-diabetes or full-blown diabetes is absolutely crucial. With type 2 diabetes, quite often the symptoms can be very mild, meaning that they go unnoticed for a long time while the disease wreaks havoc on your body. And with type 1 diabetes, the symptoms are often very severe and can come on quite quickly. In any case, knowing when something is wrong with your body, and when itmight be a sign of diabetes, is critically important togetting the proper medical care as soon as possible.Prompt diagnosis ofdiabetescan help enormously with treatment. And spottingdiabetes right before it starts can help you avoid the full-blown disease altogether! Scroll through to see these vital and evensurprising symptoms of diabetes and pleaseSHARE with friends and family. While losing weight might sound positive, unexplained weight loss of10 or more pounds in a short period of time could be a sign of something wrong with your body. Dr. Andrew Bremer of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases says, Id be concerned if youre eating more and losing weight. When your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes develops gradually, but the symptoms may seem to come on suddenly. If you notice that you or your child have several of the symptoms listed below, make an appointment to see the doctor. Here’s why symptoms seem to develop suddenly: something triggers the development of type 1 diabetes (researchers think it’s a viral infection—read this article on what causes type 1 diabetes, and the body loses its ability to make insulin. However, at that point, there’s still insulin in the body so glucose levels are still normal. Over time, a decreasing amount of insulin is made in the body, but that can take years. When there’s no more insulin in the body, blood glucose levels rise quickly, and these symptoms can rapidly develop: Extreme weakness and/or tiredness Extreme thirst—dehydration Increased urination Abdominal pain Nausea and/or vomiting Blurry vision Wounds that don’t heal well Irritability or quick mood changes Changes to (or loss of) menstruation There are also signs of type 1 diabetes. Signs are different from symptoms in that they can be measured objectively; symptoms are experienced and reported by the patient. Signs of type 1 diabetes include: Weight loss—despite eating more Rapid heart rate Reduced blood pressure (falling below 90/60) Low body temperature (below 97º F) There is an overall lack of public awareness of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Making yourself aware of the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes is a great way to be proactive about your health and the health of your family members. If you notice any of these signs or symptoms, it’s possible that you have (or your child has) type 1 diabetes. A doctor can make that diagnosis by checking blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

10 Silent Diabetes Symptoms You Might Be Missing

10 Silent Diabetes Symptoms You Might Be Missing

Diabetes has plenty of early signs, but they're subtle enough that you might not notice. Syda Productions/shutterstock "It's not like you wake up one day and all of a sudden you're thirsty, hungry, and [going to the bathroom] all the time," says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RD, a certified diabetes educator in Illinois and a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. "It picks up gradually." Indeed, "most people are unaware that they have diabetes in its early or even middle phases," says Aaron Cypess, MD, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and staff physician at Joslin Diabetes Center. Just because you're not keyed in doesn't mean you're immune from problems associated with diabetes, he adds. The longer you go without controlling diabetes, the greater your risk for heart disease, kidney disease, amputation, blindness, and other serious complications. "We recommend that people with risk factors for diabetes, such as a family history or being overweight, get evaluated on a regular basis," Dr. Cypess says. If you've been feeling off, talk to your doctor about getting a simple blood test that can diagnose the disease. And pay attention to these subtle diabetes symptoms and signs. Try these simple tricks for living well with diabetes from people who actually have it. Iryna Kolesova/shutterstock When you have diabetes, your body becomes less efficient at breaking food down into sugar, so you have more sugar sitting in your bloodstream, says Dobbins. "Your body gets rid of it by flushing it out in the urine." So going to the bathroom a lot could be one of the diabetes symptoms you're missing. Most patients aren't necessarily aware of how often they use the bathroom, says Dr. Cypess. "When we ask about it, we often hear, 'Oh yeah, I guess I Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms: See A Doctor If You Have These High Blood Sugar Signs | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms: See A Doctor If You Have These High Blood Sugar Signs | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes type 2 symptoms: See a doctor if you have these high blood sugar signs Hyperglycaemia can cause the eyes lens to become swollen. Getting your blood sugar under control can help correct vision problems, said the medical website. If blood sugar levels remain high for a long time, othereye problemscan occur. Diabetes type 2: These are the signs you should see a GP Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups. Diabetes type 2: See a GP if you have any of these signs of high blood sugar Seeing as glucose isnt converted into energy, and remains in the blood, more fluid is forced from cells. That means more fluid is delivered to the kidneys, which makes patients urinate more frequently. Urinating more often could also lead to dehydration. While everyone becomes thirsty if you havent had enough water, diabetes patients suffer excessive thirst, even after drinking lots. As the body urinates more frequently, your tissues become dehydrated quicker. Increased thirst is another common diabetes symptom. The more you urinate, the more you need to drink, and vice versa, said Healthline. Diabetes type 2: Having an unquenchable thirst could be a sign of diabetes Diabetes type 2: Frequent urination could be a sign of diabetes Small cuts and sores may take longer to heal in diabetes patients. High blood sugar makes it harder for the body to heal injuries. Open sores are more likely to develop infections. If the body isnt producing enough insulin, or the body isnt reacting to the hormone, glucose stays in the blo Continue reading >>

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