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When Should Lantus Be Given

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Lantus Solostar Pen

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Lantus Solostar Pen

This information describes how to prepare and give yourself an insulin injection (shot) with the Lantus® SoloStar® pen. Your nurse will review these steps with you and help you practice them. Storing Your Lantus® SoloStar® Pen Keep all new, unused insulin pen devices in the refrigerator. Do not freeze them. Never put the pen you are using back in the refrigerator. Keep it at room temperature, away from heat and sunlight. Discard the Lantus® SoloStar® pen 28 days after piercing the rubber stopper. Gather Your Supplies Clear off a clean, flat tabletop to work on and gather the following supplies: Lantus® SoloStar® pen A new single-use pen needle Alcohol swabs A wastebasket A sharps container (a strong, plastic container with a tight cap). Do not store your sharps in glass bottles, soda bottles, milk jugs, aluminum cans, coffee cans, or paper or plastic bags. For more information, please read How to Store and Dispose of Your Home Medical Sharps. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Open an alcohol swab and wipe the rubber tip at the top of the pen (see Figure 1). Remove the tabbed paper from the outer case of a new single-use needle (see Figure 2). Follow the steps below to prime the pen, set your dose, and inject the insulin. You must prime the pen before you set your dose and inject the insulin. You will do this by giving an “air shot.” This removes the air bubbles and ensures the pen and needle are working properly. Dial 2 units (to the number 2) on the dose selector dial by turning it clockwise (see Figure 6). You will hear and feel a faint click for each unit as you turn the dial. The punger button on the pen will also rise. If you dial past 2 units, turn the dose selector counterclockwise to correct it. Po Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. (lant-us) What is in this leaflet It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Lantus against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. What Lantus is used for Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Lantus is a long-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a rapid-acting human insulin or oral diabetes medication in combination with Lantus. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Lantus has been prescribed for you. Before you use Lantus When you must not use Lantus Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatment with your doctor. After the expiry date printed on the pack or if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering. If you use Lantus after the expiry date has passed, it may not work as well. If it has expired or is damaged, return it to your pharmacist for disposal. If the product appears cloudy, discoloured or contains particles, or if the injection pen/cartridge/vial appears damaged. If you are not sure whether you should start using this medicine, talk to your doctor. There is no experience with the use of Lantus in children less than 6 years. Before you start to use Lantus Tell your doctor if you have allergies to any other medicines, foo Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Not Only For Bedtime?

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Not Only For Bedtime?

Physicians are pursuing several different possibilities of dosing that deviate from the FDA-approved instructions for Lantus dosing. Lantus is approved only for bedtime dosing. That’s because the pre-approval studies were conducted only using bedtime dosing, therefore the FDA approved the drug that way. But from experience, patients can also use Lantus in the morning. Lantus is a “peakless” insulin…giving steady concentrations throughout the day. But for some patients, it doesn’t last the full 24 hours. Morning dosing might be preferred for these patients. That way, Lantus wears off at night when insulin requirements are lower. Some patients use BID dosing if Lantus doesn’t last all day. Explain that the big advantage to Lantus is once daily dosing. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a recombinant human insulin analog with a duration of action up to 24 hours.1 The microprecipitates that are formed in the subcutaneous tissue after injection slow the absorption of Lantus and provide a relatively constant level of insulin over 24 hours without a pronounced peak.1 This prolonged effect over 24 hours enables it to be administered once daily. Lantus is FDA approved for once-daily subcutaneous administration at bedtime for adults and children six years of age and older with type 1 diabetes mellitus or adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who require basal (long-acting) insulin for the control of hyperglycemia.1 When changing a patient (child >6 years or adult) from intermediate- or long-acting insulin to Lantus, the amount of short-acting insulin or oral antidiabetic agent may need to be adjusted. In premarketing studies, for patients using once-daily NPH or Ultralente insulin, the initial dose of Lantus was not changed. For patients using twice-daily NPH insulin, the in Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

Getting The Right Dosage

Getting The Right Dosage

Even for those on Lantus® for a while, it may take a little time to get to the right dose of insulin. Your doctor may change your Lantus® dose several times in the first few weeks. This is to be expected. For best results, keep taking your Lantus® as prescribed, and keep talking to your doctor. What if You Miss a Dose? Your doctor will guide you on when to take Lantus®. Ask him or her what to do if you forget to take your insulin, so you can be prepared in advance in case it ever happens. Here are a few ways to remember to take your Lantus® once-a-day: 3 Helpful Tips Make yourself a reminder If you take your Lantus® at night, it might also be a good idea to leave yourself a note on your nightstand as a way to remember. If you take it in the morning, put your supplies where you can't miss them—next to your toothbrush, for example. Keep out of reach of children. Add it to your other daily "to dos" Many people take Lantus® right after brushing their teeth in the evening or while making breakfast in the morning. Set an Alarm Some people set alarms on their wristwatches or mobile devices to remind them when to take their Lantus®. “We changed doses a couple of times when I started on Lantus®, until we found the right amount for me.” Continue reading >>

When Should I Inject Lantus?

When Should I Inject Lantus?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was just wondering at what time people inject their Lantus? I've been injecting 18 units of Lantus at 10pm every night. I find that it generally keeps my BS level stable through the night but recently i've been having high BS levels at about 4pm. I've been told that Lantus tends to be less effective after about 18 hours so i'm wondering if this could be the reason for my late afternoon peaks. Does anyone inject in the morning for exactly this reason? I'm worried that if i start doing this then my night time sugars levels will become unstable. Is two injections the answer?? I was always told that Lantus didn't actually drop off, it lasted pretty much the whole day at a constant rate, though I think other people here will probably testify differently. You CAN split your dose into two injections, though in all honesty that rather defeats the point of lantus given that it's not supposed to peak or trough and therefore only need one jab a day. If, however, we assume that lantus does trough, as you suggest, why not put it to good use? Maybe try doing your lantus dose in the morning - that way, when it drops off after 18 hours, it'll be in the middle of the night, when your bg's at it's lowest anyway, so theoretically with lantus you won't go too high, and you'll also prevent night-time hypos too. Obviously though, talk to the relevent medical people first though. For some people Lantus lasts longer/shorter then others, it's really something you can't help. If I were you though, I would continue to take Lantus at 10pm since it helps you though the night and most of the day, but when you bolus for Continue reading >>

Lantus Dosage

Lantus Dosage

Important Administration Instructions Administer LANTUS subcutaneously once daily at any time of day but at the same time every day. Prior to initiation of LANTUS, train patients on proper use and injection technique. Patient should follow the Instructions for Use to correctly administer LANTUS. Administer LANTUS subcutaneously into the abdominal area, thigh, or deltoid, and rotate injection sites within the same region from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Visually inspect LANTUS vials and SoloStar prefilled pens for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration. Only use if the solution is clear and colorless with no visible particles. Do not administer intravenously or via an insulin pump. Do not dilute or mix LANTUS with any other insulin or solution. General Dosing Instructions Individualize and adjust the dosage of LANTUS based on the individual's metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Dosage adjustments may be needed with changes in physical activity, changes in meal patterns (i.e., macronutrient content or timing of food intake), during acute illness, or changes in renal or hepatic function. Dosage adjustments should only be made under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Initiation of LANTUS Therapy In patients with type 1 diabetes, LANTUS must be used concomitantly with short-acting insulin.The recommended starting dose of LANTUS in patients with type 1 diabetes should be approximately one-third of the total daily insulin requirements. Short-acting, premeal insulin should be used to satisfy the remainder of the daily insulin requirements. Changing to LANTUS from Other Insulin Therapies If chan Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

When you eat, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells for energy or storage. If you take insulin, you may need some at mealtime to help lower your blood sugar after you eat. But even between meals, you need insulin in small amounts to help keep blood sugar stable. This is where long-acting insulin comes in. If you have diabetes, either your pancreas can’t produce enough (or any) insulin, or your cells can’t use it efficiently. To control your blood sugar, you need to replace or supplement the normal function of your pancreas with regular insulin injections. Insulin comes in many types. Each type differs in three ways: onset: how quickly it starts working to lower your blood sugar peak: when its effects on your blood sugar are strongest duration: how long it lowers your blood sugar According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the five types of insulin are: Rapid-acting insulin: This type starts to work just 15 minutes after you take it. It peaks within 30 to 90 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. Short-acting insulin: This type takes about 30 to 60 minutes to become active in your bloodstream. It peaks in two to four hours, and its effects can last for five to eight hours. It is sometimes called regular-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin: The intermediate type takes one to three hours to start working. It peaks in eight hours and works for 12 to 16 hours. Long-acting insulin: This type takes the longest amount of time to start working. The insulin can take up to 4 hours to get into your bloodstream. Pre-mixed: This is a combination of two different types of insulin: one that controls blood sugar at meals and another that controls blood sugar between meals. Lo Continue reading >>

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Once-daily Injection

Lantus® Can Still Be Your Choice For A Once-daily Injection

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Twice-daily Insulin Glargine For Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Twice-daily Insulin Glargine For Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Twice-daily insulin glargine for patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus Corresponding author at: Department of Medicine, Hamad Medical Corporation, P.O. Box 3050, Doha, Qatar. [email protected] Received 2018 Nov 12; Revised 2018 Dec 6; Accepted 2018 Dec 6. Keywords: Insulin glargine, Type 2 diabetes, Uncontrolled glucose This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (Insulin glargine is recombinant human insulin analog that is commonly used in patients with type 2 diabetes as well as those with type 1 diabetes. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics studies of insulin glargine had shown that it has an onset of action that ranged from 1.2 to 1.8h while its duration of action is 18 to 26h [1] . Because of its long duration of action insulin glargine is usually prescribed once daily. However, several reports have shown that the administration of insulin glargine once daily is not enough to achieve adequate glucose control in some patients requiring a twice daily dosing [2] , [3] , [4] , [5] , [6] , [7] , [8] , [9] . The first report on using insulin glargine twice daily was published shortly after its availability [2] . It described a patient with type 1diabetes who had consistently elevated bedtime glucose values on once daily insulin glargine administered in the evening. There was significant improvement in glucose values after changing the frequency of insulin glargine to twice daily as a split dose every 12h. Albright and colleagues found that twice daily glargine therapy was required in patients with type 1 diabetes who developed morning hypoglycemia and/or afternoon hyperglycemia while on once daily therapy [3] ; the twice daily regimen was associated with a significant reduction in HbA1c levels compared to patients who were on once daily Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Lantus Dosing

Lantus Dosing

Well, I never thought I’d say this, but it’s a great week to be a person with Type 1 diabetes. With all of the bad news surrounding the Type 2 drug Avandia (rosiglitazone), it’s a relief to know I don’t have to worry about it. I recommended you read my colleague Tara’s blog entry (“Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”) for the full story. That’s one of the first times in my life I’ve referred to someone as a colleague. What can I say? It’s just not a word in my describe-a-friend/coworker vocabulary. While all of the controversy surrounds Avandia, I’m way over in Type 1 land contemplating whether or not to lower my daily dose of Lantus (insulin glargine). I’ve just started a brand new bottle of Lantus and I’ve been taking my normal 15 units in the morning and then eating a rather normal breakfast and lunch, but I’m still going low in the midmorning and early afternoon. This happened Monday after eating Brussels sprouts and whole-wheat pasta for lunch and only taking one unit of rapid-acting NovoLog (insulin aspart) to help out the Lantus. I’ve known for a while that my body is sensitive to insulin, but lately it’s been a little more sensitive than usual. I took 13 units of Lantus yesterday and my blood glucose was 86 mg/dl before lunch. I often wonder how much of an adjustment two units of Lantus is. While I’m very much locked in on an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio with my NovoLog, it’s a bit tricky to judge how much the longer-lasting insulins affect your blood glucose. Is there a chart for your Lantus dose? I seem to remember something from when I was diagnosed. I wonder what Google will tell me to do. I realize that Lantus doesn’t have a true peak the way some of the other insulins do, but sometimes it su Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

Is There A Maximum Insulin Glargine (lantus) Dose?

Is There A Maximum Insulin Glargine (lantus) Dose?

Is there a maximum insulin glargine (Lantus) dose? Is there a maximum insulin glargine (Lantus) single-injection dose? Anecdotally, I have heard that patients receiving more than 50 units should split the dose from daily dosing to twice-daily. Whats the evidence? The question of a maximum insulin glargine dose is not straightforward because it encompasses several issues: How long does insulin glargine last? Does it ever need to be given twice-daily? Is there a difference in efficacy between daily and twice-daily insulin glargine dosing? Can you administer more than 50 units of insulin glargine as one single injection? Pharmacodynamics and Duration of Insulin Glargine In theory, insulin glargine should last a full 24 hours without a significant peak effect. Glargine forms a depot effect because it is only soluble at an acidic pH.1 In the vial (pH 4), the drug is completely soluble. Once injected, the solution is neutralized to biologic pH (7.4), which causes the insulin molecules to precipitate. These microprecipitates slowly dissolve over a 24-hour period. This slow dissolution results in a slower onset and a lack of a peak effect compared to other insulins, as shown below: Efficacy of Daily versus Twice-Daily Lantus Administration Although insulin glargine should last a full 24 hours, there is some evidence that its duration of action may be reduced to 20-23 hours, particularly following injection due to its delayed onset of activity of about 3-5 hours.2 Currently, the best estimate is that 15-30% of type-I diabetics will have pre-injection hyperglycemia and may benefit from twice-daily dosing. The idea of twice-daily dosing was explored in an 8-week, open-label crossover trial of 20 patients with type-I diabetes.2 Patients received either 100% of a pre-determined dos Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

What is it used for? How does it work? Lantus vials, Lantus SoloStar pre-filled pens and Lantus penfill cartridges (for use with ClikSTAR or Autopen 24 pens) contain the active ingredient insulin glargine. They are used to treat diabetes. People with diabetes have a deficiency or absence of a hormone manufactured by the pancreas called insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for the control of sugar (glucose) in the blood. People with type one diabetes need to have injections of insulin to control the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. Insulin injections act as a replacement for natural insulin and allow people with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels. Insulin injections work in the same way as natural insulin, by binding to insulin receptors on cells in the body. Insulin causes cells in the liver, muscle and fat tissue to increase their uptake of glucose from the bloodstream. It also decreases the production of glucose by the liver, and has various other effects that lower the amount of glucose in the blood. Lantus contains a type of insulin called insulin glargine. This is known as a long-acting insulin. When injected under the skin it starts working within two to three hours and produces a steady effect for 25 hours. It is used to help provide background control of blood glucose throughout the day. Insulin glargine is normally used in combination with a short-acting insulin, which is given before meals to control the increasing blood glucose levels after eating. It is important to monitor your blood glucose regularly and adjust your insulin dose as required. Your doctor or diabetic team will explain how to do this. Keeping your blood glucose level as close to normal as possible, and not too high or too low, significantly reduces the risk of Continue reading >>

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