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When Should I Take Metformin Er?

Does Anyone Take Metformin Er Twice A Day???

Does Anyone Take Metformin Er Twice A Day???

a couple years ago i took metformin ER twice a day, 1000 morning and 1000 evening. My doctor took me off it because my hba1c was doing so good and now it is not doing so good obviously as i told him so now he let me go back on it. I'm having a hard time with it this time around though. I had no problem before but now i do. i just now only last night made it up to the 1000 mgs but my goal again is to get back up to the 1000 twice a day but others here are saying that you cant do that so i just wondered if others do take it twice a day. The life of it is only up to 12 hours not 24 like they want you to think. Even my pharmacist says it is ok to take twice a day and lot of people do. it may take me a while at this rate to get there again but i'm determined. My main problem with it is some reflux even with the ER version but i'm going to stick it out and hope it resolves soon. So please let me know if you also take the ER version twice a day alone because i do not want to feel alone. I take it twice a day/1000 at a time. If I eat too quickly or take it after the meal, I have to go for the Tums. Oh, I also must not take it with a swallow of coffee or soda. Ouch! Always take it with food, however. Even a bit of cheese and celery helps. Continue reading >>

Metformin Er 500 Mg Tablet,extended Release 24 Hr

Metformin Er 500 Mg Tablet,extended Release 24 Hr

Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Metformin may be used with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise to prevent d Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the top of the line medication option for Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. If you must start taking medication for your newly diagnosed condition, it is then likely that your healthcare provider will prescribe this medication. Taking care of beta cells is an important thing. If you help to shield them from demise, they will keep your blood sugar down. This medication is important for your beta cell safety if you have Type 2 Diabetes. Not only does Metformin lower blood sugar and decrease resistance of insulin at the cellular level, it improves cell functioning, lipids, and how fat is distributed in our bodies. Increasing evidence in research points to Metformin’s effects on decreasing the replication of cancer cells, and providing a protective action for the neurological system. Let’s find out why Lori didn’t want to take Metformin. After learning about the benefits of going on Metformin, she changed her mind. Lori’s Story Lori came in worrying. Her doctor had placed her on Metformin, but she didn’t want to get the prescription filled. “I don’t want to go on diabetes medicine,” said Lori. “If I go on pills, next it will be shots. I don’t want to end up like my dad who took four shots a day.” “The doctor wants you on Metformin now to protect cells in your pancreas, so they can make more insulin. With diet and exercise, at your age, you can reverse the diagnosis. Would you like to talk about how we can work together to accomplish that?” “Reverse?” she asked. “What do you mean reverse? Will I not have Type 2 Diabetes anymore?” “You will always have it, but if you want to put it in remission, you are certainly young enough to do so. Your doctor wants to protect your beta cells in the pancreas. If you take the new medication, Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Metformin Extended Release Tablets

Generic Name: metformin hydrochloride Dosage Form: tablet, extended release Metformin Extended Release Tablets Description Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP are an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N,N-dimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The structural formula is as shown: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline compound with a molecular formula of C4H11N5· HCl and a molecular weight of 165.63. Metformin hydrochloride is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP contain 500 mg of metformin hydrochloride USP as the active ingredient. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg contain the inactive ingredients sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, hypromellose and magnesium stearate. Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP 500 mg meets USP dissolution Test 3. System Components and Performance- Metformin hydrochloride extended release tablets USP comprises a swellable matrix system. In the aqueous gastrointestinal (GI) environment, the dosage form swells remarkably thereby increasing in size and geometry from where drug is released slowly by a process of diffusion through the gel matrix that is essentially independent of pH. The hydrated polymer system is not rigid and is expected to be broken up by normal peristalsis in the GI tract. The biologically inert components of the tablet may occasionally remain intact during GI transit and will be Continue reading >>

Timing Your Metformin Dose

Timing Your Metformin Dose

The biggest problem many people have with Metformin is that it causes such misery when it hits their stomachs that they can't keep taking it even though they know it is the safest and most effective of all the oral diabetes drugs. In many cases all that is needed is some patience. After a rocky first few days many people's bodies calm down and metformin becomes quite tolerable. If you are taking the regular form of Metformin with meals and still having serious stomach issues after a week of taking metformin, ask your doctor to prescribe the extended release form--metformin ER or Glucophage XR. The extended release form is much gentler in its action. If that still doesn't solve your problem, there is one last strategy that quite a few of us have found helpful. It is to take your metformin later in the day, after you have eaten a meal or two. My experience with metformin--and this has been confirmed by other people--is that it can irritate an empty stomach, but if you take it when the stomach contains food it will behave. There are some drugs where it matters greatly what time of day you take the drug. Metformin in its extended release form is not one of them. As the name suggests, the ER version of the pill slowly releases the drug into your body over a period that, from my observations, appears to last 8 to 12 hours. Though it is supposed to release over a full 24 hours, this does not appear to be the case, at least not with the generic forms my insurer will pay for. Because there seems to be a span of hours when these extended release forms of metformin release the most drug into your blood stream, when you take your dose may affect how much impact the drug has on your blood sugars after meals or when you wake up. For example, the version I take, made by Teva, releases Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Best Time To Take Metformin Lets Find Out

Best Time To Take Metformin Lets Find Out

For this reason, type II diabetes sufferers should familiarize themselves with the right medications and treatment solutions, to help keep blood sugar at the appropriate levels. Metformin is one such drug used to help maintain proper blood sugar levels. Below we will detail how to use the medication, possible complications/side effects, why type II sufferers should use it, and detail how the medication works to help maintain blood sugar levels, in conjunction with proper diet/exercise regimen. Metformin is a prescription drug which is primarily used to help type II diabetes sufferers maintain proper blood sugar levels. The prescription can be used on its own, or in some cases doctors might prescribe additional medications to help in treating type II diabetes. Metformin is often prescribed as the first-step, in treating type II diabetes. The reason being is that it directly targets the cause of diabetes (which is your inability to produce insulin to offset the sugars you consume on a daily basis). Sufferers of type II diabetes arent capable of producing insulin to offset sugars. This means the instant they consume carbs (or sugary foods), their blood sugar levels spike. Metformin helps the body metabolize the carbs (sugary substance) which in turn helps regulate blood sugar levels, and helps maintain stability in your body. Another issue which Metformin targets is the decrease of glucose production in the liver. By decreasing glucose levels, this helps lower glucose levels in the bloodstream and also helps change the manner in which your bodys blood cells react to insulin in the future. Insulin is transported through the system more efficiently. This eliminates the spikes in blood sugar levels, and helps stabilize liver enzymes, naturally stabilizing your body. Although Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Metformin Er

Metformin Er

What Is Metformin ER? Metformin ER (Glucophage XR®, Glutametz®, and Fortamet®) is a prescription medication licensed to treat type 2 diabetes (also known as noninsulin-dependent diabetes or adult-onset diabetes). The drug is a long-acting, extended-release version of metformin. (Click Metformin Uses for more information on what metformin ER is used for, including possible off-label uses.) Who Makes Metformin ER? Generic metformin ER is made by several manufacturers. Glucophage and Glucophage XR are manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Glutametz is made by Depomed Inc., and Fortamet is made by Andrx Labs. How Does Metformin ER Work? Metformin ER works in several ways. For example, it decreases the amount of sugar (glucose) made by the liver. Metformin ER can also decrease the amount of sugar absorbed into the body (from the diet) and can decrease insulin resistance, helping the body to use insulin better. Because metformin ER does not increase the amount of insulin produced by the body, it is less likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), as many other diabetes medications can do (see Alternatives to Metformin). There have been several studies looking at the effects of metformin ER for type 2 diabetes. In these studies, metformin ER has been shown to decrease fasting blood sugar and to decrease hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). HbA1c is a test used to measure long-term blood sugar control in people with diabetes. Normal HbA1c levels are usually less than 6 percent in people without diabetes; people with diabetes usually have higher HbA1c results. Studies have shown that the higher the HbA1c, the greater the chance for developing long-term problems related to diabetes. This includes problems such as heart disease, diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, and Continue reading >>

Does It Matter If I Take Metformin At Lunch And Dinner Instead Of Breakfast And Dinner? - Agingcare.com

Does It Matter If I Take Metformin At Lunch And Dinner Instead Of Breakfast And Dinner? - Agingcare.com

Does it matter if I take Metformin at lunch and dinner instead of breakfast and dinner? I think that's a question for your nutritionist. My DH is on Metformin and is having a terrible time with it. HE refuses to watch his BS and so, I imagine it's up down and sideways. He is so sick, so often on this stuff... Having said that, I have read that it's important to take it as close to 12 hrs apart if possible. Also, to minimize the wretched s/e, eat half the meal, take your pills, then eat the rest. DH was just popping them into an empty stomach. He's trying to do the "take WITH a meal...and we'll see how it goes. Any questions, your dr should be more than agreeable to talk to you about any concerns. Or just google it---that's how I learned about the dosing WITH food. Hubby had never heard that before. My husbands is. He takes it all each morning before breakfast at the same time per his endocrinologist orders. He always eats breakfast. But his dr told him that he just needs to take it the same time each day. I have a nephew who has learned to manage his diabetes with his diet. If he knows hes going to go off his diet, he takes a metformin (not ER) at the same time. He seldom goes off the diet that he knows works for him. He checks his BS to make sure hes still on track. I think it is worth checking your BS frequently to see how your body is handling what your doctor has directed for your care. I switched to metformin ER (extended release) and have had no problems with it. I take it first thing in the morning. Then I eat breakfast. I will not follow the ADA guidelines for exchange of foods. It just has too many carbs in it. I follow a different way of eating and I test up to nine times a day. This gives me a benchmark before a meal then, I test at one hour and two hours af Continue reading >>

What Time Of Day Best To Take Metformin Er?

What Time Of Day Best To Take Metformin Er?

What time of day best to take Metformin ER? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What time of day best to take Metformin ER? I am recently diagnosed type 2, just started on Metformin ER 500mg. I typically have high fasting readings in the morning (120s-130s). I have been taking the Metformin ER with breakfast in the morning, but that next morning's reading is still high. How has everyone else fared? What time of day in your experience is best for you? My doctor did not advise on time of day, and I'll bet she'll increase my dosage next visit as well. Also, with regard to eating schedule, what do you all find is most effective for you? I'm on the same dose of metformin and I take it in the evening with supper, which is what my doc told me to do. Have you gone to the website Bloodsugar 101? Lots of great information there. Most folks here go low carb, high fat. Also get your hands on a copy of Dr. RICHARD Bernstein's book. There are 2 Dr. Bernsteins out there with books about diabetes. Make sure it is Richard's. There is also The First Year by Gretchen Becker especially for T2's and 2 by Jenny Ruhl, Blood Sugar 101 and Diet 101. I'm still working on cutting my carbs, experimenting with low carb baking. I was diagnosed last June. My morning fasting readings are in the 90's now, still not where I want them to be but better than they were. Grains are not your friend. It takes a while to change old habits but in the long run you will be glad you did. I didn't find the met er brought down my fasting numbers as much as the exercise does. I take maximum dose of the met er (2000) in a split dose. Half in the am and half in the pm. I also t Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

Metformin Er (glucophage Xr) Side Effects

Metformin Er (glucophage Xr) Side Effects

What should I watch for? Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you have high blood sugar. You might need to change the dose of your medicine. If you are sick or exercising more than usual, you might need to change the dose of your medicine. Do not skip meals. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you should avoid alcohol. Many nonprescription cough and cold products contain sugar or alcohol. These can affect blood sugar. This medicine may cause ovulation in premenopausal women who do not have regular monthly periods. This may increase your chances of becoming pregnant. You should not take this medicine if you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant. Talk with your doctor or health care professional about your birth control options while taking this medicine. Contact your doctor or health care professional right away if think you are pregnant. The tablet shell for some brands of this medicine does not dissolve. This is normal. The tablet shell may appear whole in the stool. This is not a cause for concern. If you are going to need surgery, a MR Continue reading >>

Metformin Extended-release Tablets

Metformin Extended-release Tablets

Generic Name: Metformin Extended-Release Tablets (met FOR min) Brand Name: Fortamet, Glucophage XR Warning Rarely, metformin may cause an acid health problem in the blood (lactic acidosis). The risk of lactic acidosis is higher in people with kidney problems and in people who take certain other drugs like topiramate. The risk is also higher in people with liver problems or heart failure, in older people (65 or older), or with alcohol use. If lactic acidosis happens, it can lead to other health problems and can be deadly. Lab tests to check the kidneys may be done while taking this medicine (metformin extended-release tablets). Talk with the doctor. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of too much lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis) like fast breathing, fast or slow heartbeat, a heartbeat that does not feel normal, very bad upset stomach or throwing up, feeling very sleepy, shortness of breath, feeling very tired or weak, very bad dizziness, feeling cold, or muscle pain or cramps. Do not take this medicine if you have a very bad infection, low oxygen, or a lot of fluid loss (dehydration). Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol. If you are having an exam or test with contrast or have had one within the past 48 hours, talk with your doctor. Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine (metformin extended-release tablets). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. Uses of Metformin Extended-Release Tablets: It is used to lower blood sugar in patients with high blood sugar (diabetes). What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Metformin Extended-Release Tablets? If you have an allergy to metformin or any other part of this medicine. If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, o Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl Er

Metformin Hcl Er

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL ER Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually once daily with the evening meal. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Do not crush or chew this medication. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regula Continue reading >>

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