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When Should A Diabetic Go To The Emergency Room

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Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Kidney Stones

Diagnosing Kidney Stones

Outside of these hours, you can call us and speak with a registered nurse who will review your symptoms and make recommendations to help you get appropriate care. Many people with kidney stones go to the emergency room (ER) with severe pain. In the ER at St. Joseph's, we specialize in treating patients with kidney stones. We focus on reducing pain, making an accurate diagnosis and pairing patients with urologists who specialize in treating kidney stones. A visit to the emergency room should be considered if you have: Fever and stone pain (may be a sign of a serious infection) Pain that is not helped by home medications Severe nausea or vomiting that prevents drinking fluids A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis is the best way for your doctor to determine if you have a kidney stone. A CT scan is a specialized x-ray test that allows your doctor to look inside your body. It is usually done after a clinical examination by your doctor or a doctor in the emergency room. On the CT scan, stones are easily recognized. They look similar to bones but are outside of the skeleton. Unfortunately, plain x-rays and ultrasounds tend to miss many stones. The scan is quick and painless and can help determine: The location, size and number of kidney stones How much obstruction the stone is causing The CT scan also gives information about all abdominal organs, so it may help to determine causes of abdominal pain that aren't related to a kidney stone. These can include appendicitis, gall bladder disease, abdominal aneurysms, bowel disease and hernias. During the past 15 years, computed tomography (CT) scanning has become an invaluable tool in detecting and characterizing renal and ureteral stones. The use of CT gives physicians the precise number, size and location of kidney stones. Signs of Continue reading >>

When To See The Doctor About Sprained Ankles, Concussions & Other Sports Injuries

When To See The Doctor About Sprained Ankles, Concussions & Other Sports Injuries

When to See the Doctor About Sprained Ankles, Concussions & Other Sports Injuries Uh-oh. Your child was playing soccer and hurt his ankle. Its starting to bruise and you arent sure if your childs ankle is sprained or possibly even broken. Or, did you fall down during volleyball and hit your head and youre feeling a little hazy? Could it be a concussion? Sports injuries are common and some can be cared for at home, but there are some that require the attention of a medical professional. Its with these injuries when you ask yourself, do I need to visit my doctor or is it serious enough to go to the emergency room? A sprained ankle is one of the most common sports injuries. Approximately 25,000 people sprain their ankle each day in the United States . A sprain happens when the foot rolls or turns beyond its normal range of motion. This injury can occur while taking part in sports or simply by stepping on an uneven surface. However, do you know when you need to make a doctors appointment, visit urgent care or go to the emergency room when you sprain an ankle? Make an appointment with your primary care provider if: there is pain and swelling in the ankle but you are able to walk and you believe there is the possibility that it is a sprain. Go to urgent/express care if: you are experiencing significant pain and swelling and it is difficult to bear weight or walk without assistance. Go to the emergency room if: there is immediate bruising on the foot, significant deformity, or you are unable to walk or put any pressure on the affected ankle as it could be a fracture or broken bone. A concussion is more than just a bump on the head. It is a brain injury that alters the way the brain functions and can be traumatic. While most concussions are mild, it is important to understand Continue reading >>

Guide To Being Hospitalized

Guide To Being Hospitalized

Having to stay in the hospital, whether it’s planned or an emergency, can be a stressful and an uncomfortable experience. Preparation beforehand will alleviate some of the stress and help ensure your diabetes is well managed throughout your stay. First and most importantly, be aware of and knowledgeable about your own health and your own needs. Be prepared to speak up clearly and concisely when you are confused or worried about anything that is happening. Knowing what to expect and being prepared with up-to-date information about your medical history will help you feel less anxious. It will also help the hospital staff take better care of you, and hopefully have you on the mend and on your way home as soon as possible. Who & what you need to prepare Talk to your health-care team Even before you are admitted, talk to all of the medical people who are involved in your care (surgeon, family doctor, diabetes health providers), so that you can be confident that everyone has accurate and consistent information about you. Before going to the hospital, you should also be clear about and confident in the diabetes care you can expect to receive. Consider asking your health-care team these questions in advance: Who will manage your diabetes when you are in the hospital? Will you be able to do this yourself? Will you have input with the health-care team? What adjustments to your diabetes medications or insulin dose may be necessary before and after the medical procedures or surgery? What blood glucose (sugar) levels are too high or too low? If you use an insulin pump, are hospital staff familiar with pump therapy? Ask a family member or friend to be your advocate while you are in the hospital Talk to this person about how you manage your diabetes and also about any concerns you m Continue reading >>

What Should A Person With Diabetes Do If They Get Sick With Flu Or Cold?

What Should A Person With Diabetes Do If They Get Sick With Flu Or Cold?

There are everyday actions people can take to stay healthy. Try to avoid close contact with sick people. Flu spreads mainly person-to-person through the coughing or sneezing of infected people. If you get sick, the CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them. Be sure to continue taking your diabetes pills or insulin. Don’t stop taking them even if you can’t eat. Your health care provider may even advise you to take more insulin during sickness. Test your blood glucose every four hours, and keep track of the results. Drink extra (calorie-free) liquids, and try to eat as you normally would. If you can’t, try to have soft foods and liquids containing the equivalent amount of carbohydrates that you usually consume. Weigh yourself every day. Losing weight without trying is a sign of high blood glucose. Check your temperature every morning and evening. A fever may be a sign of infection. Call your health care provider or go to an emergency room if any of the following happen to you: You feel too sick to eat normally and are unable to keep down food for more than 6 hours. You're having severe diarrhea. You lose 5 pounds or more. Your temperature is over 101 degrees F. Your blood glucose is lower than 60 mg/dL or remains over 300 mg/dL. You have moderate or large amounts of ketones in your urine. You're having trouble breathing. You feel sleepy or can't think clearly. For more information, see: Continue reading >>

Know The Symptoms Of A Diabetes Emergency

Know The Symptoms Of A Diabetes Emergency

When you are diagnosed with diabetes, there's a lot to learn. In addition to the day-to-day basics of diabetes management and treatment, there's learning to recognize the signs and symptoms of two potential diabetes-related conditions: hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). These can occur at any time and need to be treated immediately to avoid a medical emergency. Causes of Hyperglycemia Your blood sugars can rise to dangerous levels when you haven't taken enough insulin (if you are type 1) or when your insulin receptors are not working as they should (with type 2). Perhaps you miscalculated the number of carbohydrates you ate at a meal, or you were under stress or had an illness. Each of these situations can lead to hyperglycemia. Symptoms That Need Attention If you have these symptoms please call your health care professional and/or go to the emergency room: Increased thirst increased urination Nausea/vomiting Deep and/or rapid breathing Abdominal pain Fruity smelling breath Loss of consciousness Another type of dangerous situation is called Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS). This is defined as a dangerously high blood sugar that is >600 mg/dL. It is typically brought on either by an infection, such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection, or poor management of your blood sugar. If left untreated, it can result in coma and even death. Signs and symptoms include: extreme thirst confusion fever (usually over 101 degrees Fahrenheit) weakness or paralysis on one side of the body The best way to prevent HHNS is to take your medications as directed and to keep in contact with your healthcare team when your blood sugar is consistently >300 mg/dL. When to See a Doctor if your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dl. Hyperglycemia can Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And What To Do

Diabetes symptoms can quickly turn into emergencies. The disease of diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2010, claiming nearly 70,000 lives. Responding promptly to symptoms of a diabetic emergency can be lifesaving. Causes and types Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes inhibit the body's ability to manage blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes does so by destroying the cells that produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes reduces how responsive the body is to insulin, while not enough insulin is produced to counter the sugar in the body. Hence, most diabetic emergencies are related to disruptions in a person's blood sugar levels. Occasionally, even too much of a drug being used to treat diabetes can trigger a diabetic emergency. The most common diabetic emergencies include the following: Severe hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is when blood sugar levels are abnormally low. When blood sugar dips very low, it becomes a medical emergency. Hypoglycemia normally only occurs in people with diabetes who take medication that lowers blood sugar. Blood sugar levels may drop dangerously low when a person is: consuming too much alcohol exercising, especially without adjusting food intake or insulin dosage missing or delaying meals overdosing on diabetic medication Diabetic ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body does not have enough insulin to break down glucose properly, and hormones that normally work opposite insulin are high. Over time, the body releases hormones that break down fat to provide fuel. This produces acids called ketones. As ketones build up in the body, ketoacidosis can occur. Common causes of ketoacidosis include: uncontrolled or untreated diabetes an illness or infection that changes hormone production an illness or infection that chang Continue reading >>

What To Expect In The Hospital

What To Expect In The Hospital

“The wish for healing has ever been the half of health.” —Seneca the Younger Most people experience a stay in the hospital at least once in their lives, and for some, it is much more often than that. No matter what the reason for your admission to the hospital, it is imperative that your blood glucose levels be controlled while you are there. More and more research shows that maintaining optimal blood glucose control in the hospital improves a person’s chances of having the best possible medical outcome. However, achieving optimal control in the hospital is a challenge. Stress tends to raise blood glucose level, and in the hospital, the stresses are many: Illness itself is a physical stress, as are pain, surgery, and other medical procedures such as having blood drawn for tests. Simply being in the hospital is a physical and mental stress with all of the changes in routine. And worrying about the reason you’re in the hospital, whether your diabetes is being controlled properly, how much the hospitalization is going to cost you, how your family or job is making out without you, etc., simply adds to it. If your hospital admission is not an emergency, you and your health-care provider have more time to prepare so that some of the stress of being in the hospital can be minimized. For example, you can establish ahead of time whether your personal physician will be overseeing your care while you’re in the hospital or, if not, who will. You can also discuss how your diabetes will be controlled and whether and when to stop taking any medicines you may currently take. And you can make plans for dealing with such personal responsibilities as child care or pet care during your hospital stay. If you are admitted to the hospital through the emergency room, it is standard Continue reading >>

Emi Health | Members | Frequently Asked Questions

Emi Health | Members | Frequently Asked Questions

What diabetic suppplies are covered under my plan? What if I go to the emergency room and the doctor assigned to me is not a participating provider? Answer: In the case of a legitimate emergency, the claim will be paid as participating to the Table of Allowances. If you visited a nonparticipating facility, even in an emergency, you may be responsible for amounts exceeding the Table of Allowance. Answer: The Table of Allowances is the schedule for payment of eligible charges. All benefits are subject to the Table of Allowances. For example, if a provider charges $125 for a procedure for which the Table of Allowances permits a $100 payment, EMI Health will pay the specified percentage of $100, not $125. Participating providers have agreed to write off any amounts in excess of the Table of Allowances. Nonparticipating providers are under no such obligation. If EMI Health pays for services from a nonparticipating provider according to the Participating Provider Option of your plan (because of an emergency situation), you may still be responsible for any amount exceeding the Table of Allowances. If I have two insurance plans, could I still have out-of-pocket expenses? Answer: You may still need to pay some expenses out-of-pocket. EMI Health will never pay more than we would have paid if we were the primary carrier. The plan deductibles, copayments, and Table of Allowances still apply. For example, if the claim is for $100, and the primary carrier paid $80 (leaving a balance of $20), and your EMI Health plan has a $100 deductible, the $20 balance would be applied toward your deductible, but EMI Health would not pay anything toward that claim. However, if your EMI Health plan would have paid $80 (with no deductible) as the primary carrier, EMI Health would pay the $20 balance Continue reading >>

Find Diabetes Management At Emergency Rooms Near Me In Rockville Md

Find Diabetes Management At Emergency Rooms Near Me In Rockville Md

This is a great place that takes care of your needs!!! Thank you Evelin and Jury! We use physicians urgent care when we cant get into our primary physician and they are always very professional and caring. Very convenient to make [make a reservation] online and see estimated wait time. Highly recommend. Dr. Olisemeka was very professional yet personable. He evaluated and treated both my daughter and myself in this very busy flu season. He also pointed out a specific pharmacy for us to go to in order to find a specific form of a certain medication which saved us time instead of going to another pharmacy to find that they did not have what we needed. He is very thoughtful and thorough! Overall it was a very good experience. The staff was engaging and committed to making your visit comfortable. Dr. O was very professional and diligent. He exhibited behaviors of confidence and professionalism. Although there were many patients he was attending to, he did not rush through the examination and treatment plan. I went there few times. I always been satisfied by the service. Clean place and friendly staff. Great doctor with great bedside manor. Really did like him and would definitely come back. Very friendly had no problem answering any questions I had. The office on Shady Grove is phenomenal!!! I, like most people, am really limited with time and had but 20 mins. I called and made an appointment for 10 mins out. Meghan in particular was exceptional! She had everything ready for me when I arrived and had someone ready to assisted me. By the looks of it, Meghan was helping 2-3 clients at once and had full control of everything needed to be done. Once I was assisted and taken to be seen, I was in and out with great information. The overall experience was 5 star! They completely u Continue reading >>

Ou Medical Center - Emergency Care When To Go To The Er Faq

Ou Medical Center - Emergency Care When To Go To The Er Faq

Impossible is not in our vocabulary. Waiting for answers is not in our DNA. At OU Medicine, our specialized doctors and nurses solve medicine's toughest challenges. The College of Medicine is the largest component of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and is at the center of OU Medicine. Our mission is leading health care - in education, research and patient care. Welcome to OU Medicine. It is our goal to make your stay or visit as stress-free and convenient as possible. Your body is giving you a warning sign. Its telling you something is wrong. You feel sick and you are unsure if your symptoms are serious enough to require a trip to the emergency room. OU Medical System has prepared a series of questions and answers so you will know when you should consider the ER or another option which may be more appropriate and less expensive. To read more on OU Medical Center's downtown Emergency Department, click here. For information about the Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center's Emergency Department, click here. For more on OU Medical Center Edmond's Emergency Department, click here. Here are warning signs of a medical emergency, according to the American Academy of Emergency Physicians. Chest pain or upper abdominal pain that lasts at least two minutes Difficulty breathing, shortness of breath Sudden dizziness, weakness, or change in vision Severe or persistent vomiting or diarrhea Change in mental status such as confusion Fever or flu-like symptoms (a patient may have severe flu and require hospitalization) Allergic reactions (some are severe and may be life-threatening) Animal bites (these can be significant in some cases) When should I consider an urgent care center? Urgentcare centers.These doctor-staffed, walk-in medical facilities offer an alternati Continue reading >>

Emergency Department Visits For Adults With Diabetes, 2010

Emergency Department Visits For Adults With Diabetes, 2010

Raynard E. Washington, Ph.D., Roxanne M. Andrews, Ph.D., and Ryan Mutter, Ph.D. Introduction Diabetes is a critical public health concern in the United States. It is estimated that diabetes affects approximately 25.8 million Americans (8.9 percent of the population), and its incidence continues to rise annually.1 Diabetes and its associated complications are significant sources of hospitalization and medical expenditures.1,2 Patients with poor blood glucose control and overall diabetes management have significantly greater risk of acute and chronic complications, including cardiovascular, kidney, eye, and nerve diseases.3 Emergency department (ED) utilization among patients with diabetes is likely affected by several factors, including lack of primary care, poor adherence to care plans and lifestyle modifications, and presence of complications. This Statistical Brief presents data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) on ED visits among patients aged 18 years and older with diabetes in 2010. Variations in ED visit rates for patients with diabetes overall, ED visits resulting in treatment and release, and ED visits resulting in subsequent admission to the hospital are presented across patient demographics. The most common diagnoses for ED visits by patients with uncomplicated and complicated diabetes are shown, as is the variation in disposition from the ED by presence of diabetic complications. All differences between estimates noted in the text are statistically significant at the 0.05 level or better. Findings General Findings In 2010, there were approximately 12.1 million diabetes-related ED visits for adults (defined as having a diabetes diagnosis documented in the patient's discharge record), or about 9.4 percent of all ED visits for adults. This Continue reading >>

When Should I Go To The Emergency Room If I Have Diabetes?

When Should I Go To The Emergency Room If I Have Diabetes?

When should I go to the emergency room if I have diabetes? If you have diabetes, call 911 or go to the hospital emergency room if: You have these signs of very high blood sugar: You have these signs of very low blood sugar: You feel dizzy or think you might pass out You feel like you are fading away or you can't think well Chemical Toxins Relationship Abuse Diabetes Complications Body Contouring Your Lifestyle The Five Senses Stages Of Colon Cancer Patient Education For Improving Rx Drug Adherence Your Mind Male Reproductive System Parts Parenting Teens Morning Sickness & Pregnancy Mental Health Therapies Sharecare Bladder Cancer Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Digestive Diseases Schizophrenia Hydrocephalus Conception Achieved (Pregnancy) Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Critical care refers to the treatment given to people who are having life-threatening medical problems requiring the expertise of a team of highly trained medical professionals. Learn more about critical care from our experts. Continue reading >>

Tia (mini Stroke) Symptoms: A Trip To The Er Doctor's View By Dr. Wedro On Medicinenet.com

Tia (mini Stroke) Symptoms: A Trip To The Er Doctor's View By Dr. Wedro On Medicinenet.com

The doctor advises the woman that there is a need to rush to medical care because if the symptoms do not resolve, there is a very narrow window of time to use alteplase ( Activase , TPA), a clot busting drug, to reverse the stroke . Within three hours of the onset of stroke symptoms , the patient needs to get to the hospital, have the initial diagnosis made, have blood tests drawn, a CT scan done to insure that bleeding is not the cause of the stroke, a neurologist needs to be consulted, and the drug given. The earlier the patient is given TPA for stroke, the better the potential outcome and the lower the risk of complications. Quick GuideStroke Causes, Symptoms, and Recovery A TIA is a stroke that resolves. Most symptoms get better on their own within minutes, but by definition, it may take up to 24 hours for the neurologic deficits to resolve. Because there is no way of knowing when a stroke begins, or whether it will resolve on its own, the EMS system (Emergency Medical Services) or 911 needs to be activated at the first sign of stroke. These symptoms of stroke include: weakness or paralysis on one side of the body, due to circulation problems at the base of the brain, loss of coordination and balance and falling without notice. Unfortunately, many patients do not qualify for TPA because they or their family do not recognize the symptoms of stroke and wait too long at home. The three hour window is very narrow. In some large hospitals, the window can be extended a couple of additional hours, if the hospital has the capability of injecting the drug directly into the blocked artery in the brain. This requires both a radiologist with special skills to thread a catheter or tube into the brain blood vessels and a hospital with the necessary equipment to do the procedure. Continue reading >>

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