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When Metformin Doesn't Work

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S

F A C T S H E E T F O R P A T I E N T S A N D F A M I L I E S

Diabetes Medications: What is metformin? Metformin is used to treat type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Metformin is taken by mouth (orally) as a pill. Like other diabetes medications, it works best when you follow the rest of your treatment plan. This means checking your blood glucose regularly, following your meal plan, and exercising every day. What does it do? Metformin helps lower your blood glucose (blood sugar). It does this in two ways: • Decrease the amount of glucose released by your liver. Less glucose enters into your bloodstream. • Increase the ability of your muscles to use glucose for energy. As more glucose is used, more glucose leaves your bloodstream. Why is metformin important for my health? Metformin can’t cure your diabetes. But by helping control your blood glucose, it lowers the chance that your diabetes will cause serious problems. As you know, when you have diabetes, you tend to have high blood glucose. Over time, this can damage your blood vessels and nerves, leading to heart attack or stroke, kidney and eye disease, and problems with your teeth, feet, and skin. If you have high blood pressure or high cholesterol — like many people with diabetes — you have an even greater risk for these problems. (This is why you should always take your blood pressure or cholesterol medications as well as your diabetes medications.) Metformin is the generic name of this medication. Brand names are Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Like other diabetes medications, biguanides work best when you follow the rest of your diabetes treatment plan. Does metformin cause hypoglycemia (low blood glucose)? Metformin doesn’t cause hypoglycemia by itself. But combined with other medications, vigorous exercise, or too little food, it ca Continue reading >>

Metformin And Other Medications For Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin And Other Medications For Type 2 Diabetes

Developed by the Washington University/St. Louis Children’s Hospital Diabetes Team 2015 In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin (keys) AND the insulin doesn’t work as well as normal (insulin resistance). Insulin is the KEY to let sugar into your cells and bring down your blood sugar. There are only a few medications used for type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents. These are metformin and insulin. There are other medications that are used more often in adults with type 2 diabetes. Insulin is always given by shots. If you need insulin, your diabetes team will teach you how to use it. Metformin A pill that is taken 1- 2 times every day. Other Common Names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR How does it work? Metformin brings down blood sugar by making insulin work better (decreasing insulin resistance) and causing the liver to make less sugar. It can take several days or even weeks before metformin works well. What if I miss a dose? Take your dose as soon as you remember. If it is more than 2 hours from your missed dose, then skip the missed dose. DO NOT take 2 doses at the same time. Common Side Effects: Loose stools/diarrhea, upset stomach, and gas. These USUALLY GET BETTER if you keep taking your metformin. Try taking it with food. If the symptoms bother you a lot, ask about an extended release form. Serious Side Effects: Rare risk of lactic acidosis – a form of too much acid in your blood. DON’T TAKE YOUR METFORMIN if you have VOMITING/DIARRHEA, are having SURGERY, or are having CT SCAN with CONTRAST. If it is a scheduled procedure, stop metformin 24-48 hours before it is scheduled. You can restart metformin 24 hours after you recover. Call your doctor right away if you have fast breathing, fast heartbeat, shortness o Continue reading >>

What If Metformin Doesn't Work

What If Metformin Doesn't Work

What If Metformin Doesn'T Work Metformin doesn't work for me - What should I do? Metformin; Metformin doesn't work for me ... Metformin doesn't work for me ... I took metformin and it didn't work for me either. Metformin (Oral Route) Description and Brand Names - Mayo Clinic Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by ... To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and ... What to do next when metformin does not work in diabetes ... What to do next when metformin does not work in diabetes Type2 ... Monotherapy with metformin is widely accepted as the second step in type 2 diabetes ... Metformin not working - Diabetes Daily Metformin not working. Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last. ... Metformin just doesn't work without one or both of those. You might need to go on other medication entirely or, ... metformin not working?? | Yahoo Answers Metformin not working?? ... And i heard janumet is pratically the same thing as metformin so why would this work any better if metformin hasn't? What's the next step if metformin doesn't work? - Polycystic ... ... What's the next step if metformin doesn't work? Why did your doctor put you on metformin to start your period? What happens if it doesn't work? | Diabetes UK What happens if it doesn't work? ... If metformin doesn't work, ... it doesn't take into consideration anything like your bone structure, ... metformin not working - Low Carb Friends metformin not working. Ughhh I hate this. ... Wondering if metformin sometimes doesn't work and they try other rxs? or if they'll just start upping the dosage. What happens if metformin etc doesn't work? | Diabetes Forum ... What happens if metformin etc doesn't work? Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by RobsterinSheff, ... My plan Continue reading >>

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Did you know that one of the main reasons you can't lose weight with PCOS is because of your hormones? It's true, and that's why many women (and physicians) turn to using Metformin to try and help with weight loss. But just because it works for some people doesn't mean it will necessarily work for YOU. Find out why metformin helps with weight loss, but more important what works better and how to finally lose weight if you have PCOS. ​ Insulin & PCOS: Why It's so Important One of the most common medications prescribed for PCOS is metformin. But, PCOS is a hormonal condition which results in weight gain, hair growth on the face, infertility, acne and estrogen/progesterone imbalances. So why is metformin, a medication used to lower blood sugar and treat insulin resistance, used to treat estrogen/progesterone imbalances in women? The logic is quite simple: Most of the symptoms of PCOS (all those listed above) stem from insulin resistanc e! In fact many physicians recommend that ALL women with PCOS should be treated for insulin resistance regardless of what their fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar levels are. This means that the root cause of PCOS (at least the majority of it) is insulin resistance, and this is why metformin is so commonly used to treat. Insulin resistance causes a block of glucose uptake in your skeletal muscles which results in a lower metabolism (and weight gain), insulin also directly acts on your ovaries and adrenals increasing androgens like testosterone and DHEA. It's also the action of insulin on your pituitary that results in increased LH production which over stimulates your ovaries resulting in the characteristic "cysts" of PCOS. ​ High levels of DHEA and testosterone lead to acne and hair growth (hirsutism). ​ But one simple question r Continue reading >>

Unlocking The Secrets Of Type 2 Diabetes Drug

Unlocking The Secrets Of Type 2 Diabetes Drug

In a joint effort, Melbourne researchers with a team from Canada have described for the first time the action of the type 2 diabetes drug metformin. This research answers decade-long questions about how metformin works and may help develop more effective therapies for the more than 1 million Australians currently living with type 2 diabetes. Despite its front-line role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, until now no-one has been able to explain how the drug lowers blood sugar for those patients living with the condition. Researchers at St Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, in collaboration with colleagues at McMaster University in Canada, are the first to solve that mystery, with their discovery that metformin works by reducing fat in the liver. Their research is published in today’s issue of the prestigious journal Nature Medicine. Professor Bruce Kemp from St Vincent’s Institute who has worked closely on the project said, “This work, the result of a great international collaboration, has the potential to help develop more effective treatments for type 2 diabetes, which currently affects 4% of Australians and represents an ever growing burden on our health system.” Senior author on the study, Associate Professor Greg Steinberg from McMaster University and former researcher from St Vincent’s Institute said, “The key is that metformin doesn’t work to lower blood glucose by directly working on the glucose. It works on reducing harmful fat molecules in the liver, which then allows insulin to work better and lower blood sugar levels.” Dr Sandra Galic from St Vincent’s Institute and co-lead author on the study, was keen to work out the mechanism of action of metformin. “We knew that metformin activates the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Metformin. What Do You Need To Know?

Metformin. What Do You Need To Know?

What is type 2 diabetes? People with diabetes are not able to make enough insulin and/or respond normally to the insulin their body does make. When this happens, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. This can lead to serious medical problems including kidney damage, amputations and blindness. Diabetes is also closely linked to heart disease. The main goal of treating diabetes is to lower the level of your blood sugar as close to normal as possible. How is type 2 diabetes usually controlled? High blood sugar can be lowered by diet and exercise, by a number of oral medications and by insulin injections. Before taking biguanidas (metformin hydrochloride tablets) you should first try to control your diabetes by exercise and weight loss. Even if you are taking biguanidas, you should still exercise and follow the diet recommended for your diabetes. Does Metformin work differently from other glucose-control medications? Yes it does. Until Metformin was introduced, al¡ the available oral glucose-control medications were from the same chemical group called sulfonylureas. These drugs lower blood sugar primarily by causing more of the body's own insulin to be released. Metformin lowers the amount of sugar in your blood by helping your body respond better to its own insulin. Metformin (metformin hydrochloride tablets) does not cause your body to produce more insulin. Therefore, Metformin rarely causes hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and it doesn't usually cause weight gain. What happens if my blood sugar is still too high? When blood sugar cannot be lowered enough by either Metformin or a sulfonylurea, the two medications may be effective taken together. However, if you are unable to maintain your blood sugar with diet, exercise and glucose-control medication taken orally, then y Continue reading >>

What If Metformin Doesn’t Work – 111189

What If Metformin Doesn’t Work – 111189

This amazing site, which includes experienced business for 9 years, is one of the leading pharmacies on the Internet. We take your protection seriously. They are available 24 hours each day, 7 days per week, through email, online chat or by mobile. Privacy is vital to us. Everything we do at this amazing site is 100% legal. – Really Amazing prices – NO PRESCRIPTION REQUIRED! – Top Quality Medications! – Discount & Bonuses – Fast and Discreet Shipping Worldwide – 24/7 Customer Support. Free Consultation! – Visa, MasterCard, Amex etc. – – – – – – – – – – What If Metformin Doesn’T Work Metformin used for PCOS: Everything You Need to KnowMetformin is a medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes, and commonly prescribed for PCOS. What is the real relationship between Metformin used for PCOS?Metformin Reviews & Ratings at Drugs.comUser Reviews for Metformin. Also known as: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet. The following information is NOT intended to endorse drugs or Metformin | Bad DrugThe specifications, FDA history, warnings and contraindications, uses and a list of adverse side effects of the drug MetforminDaily Dose | HealthCentralThe drug in Chantix and other smoking cessation products, varenicline, may increase the risk for cardiovascular events like heart attack, stroke, arrhythmias Metformin and weight loss – Weight Loss Alternatives – MedHelpI’ve been taking 500 mg/day of metformin. Just wondering if any of you have taken this, and if so, have you experienced any weight loss?Metformin, the Liver, and Diabetes – Diabetes Self-ManagementThe liver is one of the most complicated organs in cheap viagra online the body and plays a huge role in handling sugars. When should you take metformin to work with the li Continue reading >>

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Most people think diabetes comes from pancreas damage, due to autoimmune problems or insulin resistance. But for many people diagnosed “Type 2,” the big problems are in the liver. What are these problems, and what can we do about them? First, some basic physiology you may already know. The liver is one of the most complicated organs in the body, and possibly the least understood. It plays a huge role in handling sugars and starches, making sure our bodies have enough fuel to function. When there’s a lot of sugar in the system, it stores some of the excess in a storage form of carbohydrate called glycogen. When blood sugar levels get low, as in times of hunger or at night, it converts some of the glycogen to glucose and makes it available for the body to use. Easy to say, but how does the liver know what to do and when to do it? Scientists have found a “molecular switch” called CRTC2 that controls this process. When the CRTC2 switch is on, the liver pours sugar into the system. When there’s enough sugar circulating, CRTC2 should be turned off. The turnoff signal is thought to be insulin. This may be an oversimplification, though. According to Salk Institute researchers quoted on RxPG news, “In many patients with type II diabetes, CRTC2 no longer responds to rising insulin levels, and as a result, the liver acts like a sugar factory on overtime, churning out glucose [day and night], even when blood sugar levels are high.” Because of this, the “average” person with Type 2 diabetes has three times the normal rate of glucose production by the liver, according to a Diabetes Care article. Diabetes Self-Management reader Jim Snell brought the whole “leaky liver” phenomenon to my attention. He has frequently posted here about his own struggles with soarin Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, The Quick Start Guide

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, The Quick Start Guide

How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A Fully Reversible Disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing this truth is the crucial first step in reversing your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Actually, it something that most people already instinctively recognized to be true. Suppose y Continue reading >>

Glumetza

Glumetza

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? 500 mg Each white, film-coated, oval-shaped tablet, debossed with "M 500", contains metformin HCl 500 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: hypromellose, microcrystalline cellulose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycol, polysorbate, titanium dioxide, and polyethylene oxide. 1000 mg E Continue reading >>

Metformin And Insulin Resistance

Metformin And Insulin Resistance

About a year ago, my endocrinologist determined that I was exhibiting signs of insulin resistance. In short, my body requires more than the average amount of insulin to cover carbohydrate. She suggested that I start taking metformin, noting that it would do two things for me: It would decrease the amount of insulin I need to take and it would help curb my appetite, thus resulting in weight loss. When I first got on it, I thought it was great. My blood sugar levels improved, my appetite was in fact curbed, and all seemed wonderful — until I stopped taking my metformin. As a high school senior, I had atrocious sleeping habits! That, coupled with the fact that taking metformin was really killing my appetite, was causing me to become exhausted and get some pretty severe headaches. Looking back on it now, it’s very clear that the metformin wasn’t the problem, it was me. However, as a stubborn senior in high school, I was determined to maintain my sleeping habits, as I deemed them completely normal and in accordance with the typical behavior exhibited by my peers (boy, how I’ve changed…). So, I stopped the metformin. The last three weeks or so, I’ve been back on metformin regularly. I decided to start it up again after my last appointment with my CDE. Thus far, it’s really been working wonders and my blood sugars have decreased substantially! Where my 30-day average was hovering around 190 just a few weeks ago, it has now dropped to 137! I was seriously shocked when I saw how much my average fell. For the most part, my blood sugar levels are in range, but I have had my fair share of lows as well. Managing metformin really is a science that can change on a daily basis depending on my activity level. For example, the first two weeks that I was back on metformin, I Continue reading >>

Metformin For Type 1 Diabetes - Really? Why?

Metformin For Type 1 Diabetes - Really? Why?

You've heard it before: someone with type 2 diabetes goes on insulin. That's no surprise. But how often have you heard the reverse — someone with type 1 going on Metformin? Since the launch of Symlin in 2005, it's not uncommon for people to treat their type 1 diabetes with a supplemental injectable medication. But hang around long enough, and you too might get to know someone with type 1 who takes insulin and oral meds, those formerly known as "type 2 only" drugs. Really? Type 1's taking oral meds alongside insulin? To clarify this, I just had to query some experts. Just like in type 2 diabetes, people with type 1 diabetes can sometimes suffer from insulin resistance (when the insulin that's present can't perform it's work properly), and Metformin can lower your insulin requirements by helping the body make better use of the stuff — in this case coming from an injection or insulin pump. Gary Scheiner, CDE, author, and head of Integrated Diabetes Services in Wynnewood, PA, explained it this way: "Some of the more creative and aggressive endos are prescribing Metformin for type 1's, particularly if they are overweight or requiring very large basal insulin doses. In addition to having some mild appetite-suppression effects, it will enhance insulin sensitivity by hepatic cells (in the liver) and limit the amount of glucose secreted by the liver. Personally, I think it can be helpful during adolescence as well. As long as the patient has good liver and kidney function, the side effects and risks are negligible." I also learned this: a couple of other uses of Metformin for women to consider are PCOS (ovary disease) and pregnancy. Kelley Champ Crumpler, RN, who is a diabetes nurse educator and a type 1 diabetic married to an endocrinologist with type 1 diabetes (how's that Continue reading >>

Type 2 Non Insulin Therapies

Type 2 Non Insulin Therapies

Pramlintide is an injected medicine for people with diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, Pramlintide can be taken in addition to insulin to help control mealtime blood sugars. If you have type 2 diabetes, and lifestyle changes are not enough to control your blood sugar, typically, your provider will first start you on a single medicine. For people who are overweight, metformin is usually the first medicine prescribed. If the single therapy doesn’t work, additional medicines can be added. Many people require treatment with 2, 3 or more different medicines. If pill combinations don’t work, an injected medicine such as an incretin-based medicine, amylin analog or insulin may be prescribed. Medicine combinations are used because different drugs target different parts of your body’s sugar regulation system. Rarely, and usually due to other medical conditions, it may be necessary to start medical treatment of type 2 diabetes with insulin therapy. Usually, however, insulin therapy is the last treatment prescribed and is added only after the oral medications or non-insulin injections don’t work. There are six types of non-insulin medicines used to treat type 2 diabetes: Incretin based therapies: Pills and injections that reduce sugar production in the liver and slow the absorption of food In this section, you also can review: A Table of Non-Insulin Medications: A summary of all the oral medications and non insulin injected therapies including the common doses and side effects. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to Continue reading >>

For The Love Of Berberine: What It Is And Why I Take It To Lower Blood Sugar, Bad Cholesterol, And Weight (plus 5 Faqs)

For The Love Of Berberine: What It Is And Why I Take It To Lower Blood Sugar, Bad Cholesterol, And Weight (plus 5 Faqs)

Since I saw my first patient in 1989, I’ve refined my approach to health and healing. Probably the biggest needle mover is my growing respect for plant medicine and its role in healing. My enthusiasm for berberine is in lockstep with my personal and professional experience prescribing herbs, but also as the evidence continues to mount about their relative safety and benefits. In this series, I will feature my favorite herbal therapies that you may want to consider, depending on your issues, and discuss with your integrative clinician. Our first herb is the herbal superstar known as berberine. When it comes to re-balancing your hormones, I believe in starting first with targeted lifestyle changes, such as upgrading the way you eat, move, and think. Fill the likely nutritional gaps. If that doesn’t work, try herbal therapies, and if you still are suffering, consider bioidentical hormone therapy. In my book, The Hormone Reset Diet, I recommend berberine as you finish the 21-day protocol, when you liberalize your eating. Berberine is insulin-sensitizing, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activity will help you stay out of harm’s way, if it’s used strategically and wisely. What is berberine? Berberine is a naturally-occurring yellow plant extract with a long history of medicinal use in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine. Found in the roots, rhizomes, stems, and bark of various plants including goldenseal (Hydrastis Canadensis), barberry (Berberis vulgaris), goldenthread (Coptis chinensis), Oregon grape (Berberis aquifolium), phellodendron (Phellodendron amurense, and not to be confused with the unrelated household plant, philodendron), and tree turmeric (Berberis aristata). Historically, berberine’s rich yellow color made it valuable as a natural dye. What does berbe Continue reading >>

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