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When Diabetes Is Out Of Control

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What Are The Risks For A Mother And Baby Of Skipping Gestational Diabetes Testing During Pregnancy?

When you leave your doctor’s office, do you ever wonder what he’s not telling you? Every appointment, he tells you to eat less sugar and go on more walks, but aren’t there other ways to get your diabetes under control? Here’s 3 tricks to manage your diabetes that your doctor won’t tell you: Eat More Fat You read that right. Eat more fat. That’s because fat helps your body absorb insulin. That means the more fat you eat, the easier it’ll be to manage your blood sugar. But here’s the kicker: It’s got to be the right type of fat. You’re looking for Unsaturated Omega-3 Fat. Here’s some great sources: Fish Eggs (Any eggs labeled “enriched” have plenty of omega-3) Grass-fed beef (There’s lots of omega-3 in the grass) Do Some Pushups… Or any kind of strength exercises. All the cardio your doctor tells you to do will increase your insulin absorption a little, but to really keep your body regulated you’ve got to get your entire body moving. The best way to do that is any exercise that focuses on strength. You want to avoid straining yourself, but make a habit of doing a few pushups every day, throw in some body squats, and soon you’ll be taking tighter cont Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. asmith79

    I am looking for any information on coding Diabetes, Type 2, uncontrolled for ICD 10. In a recent educational discussion there was some confusion on which was the appropriate code to use, E11.9 or E11.65. The thought behind E11.65 is that the terms "uncontrolled" and "out of control" have the same meaning. When you look in the alpha index under diabetes, out of control, ( page 95) , it directs you to code "Diabetes, specificed type, with hyperglycemia" which would take you to E11.65.
    During the discussion some argued that the terms "uncontrolled" and "inadequately controlled" or "out of control" did not have the same meaning. Does any one have any documentation supporting or disputing this?
    Also, it was brought up that since our chart just said "uncontrolled" how could we use the code E11.65 since it specifically stated hyperglycemia? Is there any documentation out there stating that "uncontrolled" diabetes refers to hyperglycemia?
    Anything would be appreciated!
    Thanks!!!
    Angela Smith CPC, CFPC, COBGC

  2. BenCrocker

    Found this: http://journal.ahima.org/2012/05/16/...n-icd-10-cm-4/ Apparently ICD 10 doesn't use the term UNCRONTROLLED anymore. It's either inadequately controlled, Out of control, or Poorly controlled.

  3. mitchellde

    Originally Posted by BenCrocker
    Found this: http://journal.ahima.org/2012/05/16/...n-icd-10-cm-4/ Apparently ICD 10 doesn't use the term UNCRONTROLLED anymore. It's either inadequately controlled, Out of control, or Poorly controlled. The problem I have with articles like this is that this is someone's version or opinion and they wrote an article. At no time is an official source cited for that statement. I agree that diabetes with hyperglycemia is an out of control disease process, however I do not agree that just because the provider documents "uncontrolled", that this is always what they are referencing. In other words a diabetic patient that does not always adhere to proper diet or does not take the insulin correctly, while they may not yet be hyperglycemic, the provider may document the diabetes is poorly controlled. The coding guidelines do not direct us to code uncontrolled status as diabetes with hyperglycemia. And the classification does not have a listing for diabetes, uncontrolled, or uncontrolled, diabetes. Without an official source, I will default to , if the provider does not state diabetes with hyperglycemia, then it cannot be coded that way.
    Another point to consider on this, an endocrinologist once told me that the reason the ICD-9 classification choices state, uncontrolled, or not stated as uncontrolled instead of uncontrolled vs controlled, is that diabetes is truly never in a "controlled" state and the reason this is not stated this way in ICD-10 CM is because the physician does not need to document this, it is understood that the reason we monitor the diabetic patient as closely as we do is because they are never truly under control. He had a lot more to say on this subject and it does make sense.
    So I would hesitate to put stock in an article that makes a bold statement but does not back it up.

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