diabetestalk.net

Wheat For Diabetes Patients

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Diabetes is a metabolic disease, meaning there is a glitch in the way the body converts food energy into usable energy. A healthy reaction to eating carbohydrate is a rise in blood sugar (glucose) followed by insulin being released as a response. The insulin acts as a key to open up cells within the brain and organs to let glucose in to be used as an immediate source of energy. Any unused energy is then stored in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Someone with diabetes has a rise in blood glucose but insulin is either not released or cells are resistant to the insulin. This is why diabetics have difficulty returning their high blood sugar levels back down to normal and thus need to control how much carbohydrate (glucose source) they put into their body throughout the day. Control carbohydrates. With a little effort and control diabetes can easily be managed. Diabetics should not condemn, but rather control carbohydrates. They should focus on allowing their body only the amount of carbohydrates it can handle at one time (this can be determined by a doctor or registered dietitian). Despite being diabetic, the body still needs and uses carbohydrates as its preferred source of energy. In fact, it is the only source of fuel for the brain! So it should never be eliminated, just merely controlled so your body can handle the glucose load. Stick to an eating plan. There is no single ideal eating plan for those with diabetes; the recommended plan is specific to a person’s weight, medication, blood sugars, cholesterol, and other medical conditions or concerns. Despite the varying eating plans, all diabetics should be consistent with their eating habits. Also, they need to eat about every 4-5 hours to prevent blood sugars from getting too low. Additionally, breakfast is an impor Continue reading >>

Which Is Better For A Diabetic: Chapati Or Rice?

Which Is Better For A Diabetic: Chapati Or Rice?

Diabetics need to be especially careful of their dietary choices because they are unable to naturally control blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetics don’t produce enough insulin, which is needed to shuttle glucose from the bloodstream into cells. In contrast, type 2 diabetics produce enough insulin but their cells are resistant to its affect. Common Indian foods such as chapati and rice can be eaten by diabetics in moderation, but different varieties are better suited to diabetic diets because they have lower glycemic indexes. Consult your doctor about the importance of choosing foods with a low glycemic index. Video of the Day Carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables and grains are not metabolized into glucose at the same rate. Some are quickly digested, causing spikes in blood glucose and insulin release, while others are broken down more slowly, which impacts blood sugar and insulin levels to a much lesser degree. The glycemic index is a comparative measure of how quickly a carbohydrate is reduced into glucose. In general, foods with index values of 55 or less have low impact on blood sugar levels and are considered most appropriate for diabetics. Index values between 56 and 69 are considered to have a moderate impact on blood glucose and insulin, whereas values of 70 or greater represent significant impact. The glycemic index of rice depends on whether the grain is polished or not, whereas the index of chapati depends on the type of flour used. Rice for Diabetics Diabetics can safely eat all types of rice, although their portions should be moderated. In the production of brown rice, only the outermost hull is removed from the rice kernel. White rice is further milled, processed and polished, which reduces the nutritional value of the grain. In addition to containing Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

You’ve probably noticed a lot of food packages on grocery store shelves with gluten-free labels. If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if gluten is something you should avoid. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains. These include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten can cause inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease. This can result in symptoms that include: It’s necessary to follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease. Some symptoms of celiac disease are experienced by people with a condition known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). These people don’t experience the same kind of injury and irritation to the small intestine as those with celiac disease, but gluten intolerance can still cause physical and mental problems. Intolerance to other components of gluten-containing foods — such as FODMAPs, a group of fermentable carbohydrates — may cause physical or mental problems. NCGS can sometimes lead to fuzzy thinking and depression. About 1 in 100 people have celiac disease, but about 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Research suggests that there may be a genetic link between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. Certain biomarkers in your blood that make you more likely to have celiac disease may increase your risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Both conditions have an inflammatory component, which causes the immune system to attack the body’s tissues or organs, such as the intestines or pancreas. There doesn’t appear to be a connection between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Gluten is found in many high-carb foods because they are often grain-based. High-carb foods can raise your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Wheat For Diabetes

Wheat For Diabetes

All over the world, wheat is one of the most important crops that is both cultivated and consumed. In America, wheat is included in a number of recipes ranging from bread to pasta, cakes to cookies, and pies to pizzas. The best way to maximize the benefits of this wholesome grain is to have it unrefined. When wheat is refined, it is basically stripped of all its major nutrients. Wheat thus consumed, just adds calories without any of its natural goodness. The health benefits of wheat are many. Whole wheat is rich in vitamins B1, B2, and B3 along with zinc, iron, calcium, magnesium, folic acid, phosphorus and fiber. Whole wheat products retain all these nutrients and help keep a host of health problems in check. A lot of research has been conducted on wheat for diabetes. The magnesium content in wheat is believed to be responsible for activating enzymes in the body that balance out insulin production and glucose levels. When the body fails to produce enough insulin to break down the sugar in the food you eat, high blood sugar and diabetes can develop. Eating a diet rich in wheat is very beneficial for diabetics. If you choose whole wheat products such as wheat bread, wheat flour and broken wheat for diabetics, you are essentially providing the body with the means to control cholesterol and reduce fat. This in turn can prevent diabetes from developing. Recent studies show that eating a diet rich in whole grains can lower your risk of diabetes significantly. Complex carbohydrates provided by whole wheat products help burn more calories and lose weight over time by keeping you fuller for longer. Carbohydrates are also necessary for the proper functioning of the digestive system and the elimination of waste. Every time you choose a wheat product, make sure you choose items th Continue reading >>

Should You Worry About Wheat?

Should You Worry About Wheat?

Should You Worry About Wheat? by Berkeley Wellness | August 01, 2012 Wheat has long been a dietary pariah for the millions of people who have jumped on the low-carb-diet bandwagon or who think they’re allergic (or at least sensitive) to the grain. Now even more people are hesitating about eating wheat after reading the claims made by William Davis, M.D., a cardiologist and author of the bestseller Wheat Belly, which is subtitled “Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health.” Not only does wheat make us fat, Dr. Davis says, it is addictive and causes everything from heart disease, diabetes and obesity to arthritis, osteoporosis, cognitive problems and cataracts. In fact, he claims, it has caused “more harm than any foreign terrorist can inflict on us.” Wouldn’t it be great if there was a single villain behind the chronic health problems plaguing us, and if all it took to reverse them was to stop eating wheat? It's true that those with celiac disease, which causes symptoms such as diarrhea, bloating, cramps, weight loss, fatigue and more, do have good reason to avoid wheat (see "Celiac Disease" box, below). But for the rest of us, there doesn't appear to be one sole dietary scoundrel. Key points—and counterpoints Claim: Most grains are bad, but modern wheat is the worst because it has been altered over the years via selective breeding and is now a virtual “Frankengrain.” It is loaded with amylopectin A (a starch unique to wheat), which is “worse than table sugar,” Dr. Davis says, boosting blood sugar dramatically and stimulating appetite. Modern wheat also contains other components with adverse effects, and its gluten, a protein, is more likely to trigger reactions than that in older wheat. Fact: For well over a century, food s Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

When it comes to flours, making the right choice is very important to blood sugar control. So we've gathered some great info here for you to use in your kitchen and menu preparations. Are Grains & Flour Really Good For Fiber? We've often been told that eating whole grains is a great source of fiber. And while ‘whole grains' do provide some fiber they are not the only thing that provide us with our daily fiber needs, vegetables do too. For example: 1 slice of wholewheat bread has 1.9 g of fiber, while a carrot has 2.3 g. All grains and vegetables do range in fiber content, but vegetables are a great source of daily fiber and are also higher in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants than grains. So we don't have to eat grains in order to get adequate fiber. Changing A Grain Into A Flour Changes The Way It Affects Blood Sugar Often when we take a grain and make it into flour, it changes the carb and fiber content. So what tends to happen for you as a diabetic is that most types of flours will make your blood sugar spike like wild fire. At least that's what most people experience, which is why our meal plans contain virtually no grain flours at all. An example of this is buckwheat. Eaten whole it has a glycemic index (GI) of around 49, which is a low GI. But take it and turn it into bread and it changes to a GI of 67, meaning it affects your blood sugar more rapidly and more intensely than eating the whole grain itself. Here is another example using wheat. Whole wheat kernals are a very low GI of 30, but we don't tend to eat whole wheat kernals, we eat whole wheat flour and it has an average GI of around 74. Whole Grain Flours Are A Better Option It's true that whole grains are better as far as nutrition goes. As the Minnesota Department of Health explains, the whole grain Continue reading >>

Can Wheat Cause Diabetes?

Can Wheat Cause Diabetes?

By Dr John Briffa on 16 September 2009 in Diabetes/Metabolic Syndrome , Healthy Eating , Specific conditions , Unhealthy Eating! The obvious answer to this question is yes, seeing as many wheat-based foods are very disruptive to blood sugar (they have high glycaemic index), particularly when eaten in quantity (meaning they have high glycaemic load too). As a result, the pancreas will generally need to pump out plenty of insulin. This, in time, can lead to insulin resistance. It can also lead to pancreatic exhaustion. Both of these situations will cause blood sugar to rise, which can lead to type 2 diabetes in time. However, this blog is not about the relationship between wheat and its relationship to type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is actually the focus here. Type 1 diabetes is what is known as an autoimmune condition, which means its caused by the bodys immune system attacking its own tissues. In this case, the tissue that is damaged involve the cells in the pancreas responsible for secreting insulin. The question is, what causes the immune system to attack these cells? Some have theorised that type 1 diabetes might be caused by a viral infection. In theory, as the immune mounts its defence against this foreign invader, the reaction then overspills to the cells in the pancreas. However, other scientists have suggested that the underlying trigger factor is not a virus, but food. There has, in the past, been more than a suggestion that type 1 diabetes may be related to intolerance to milk (specifically proteins in milk) [1-3]. A recent study published in the journal Diabetes provides some evidence that another potential trigger factor in type 1 diabetes is wheat [4]. In this study, 42 individuals with type 1 diabetes were assessed with regard to their immune response t Continue reading >>

Best Bread For People With Diabetes

Best Bread For People With Diabetes

The smell of a freshly baked bread, or the sight of bread, is enough to send your senses reeling. Though people with diabetes should eat bread in moderation, sometimes it can be easy to get carried away. After all, bread is one of the most popular foods all over the globe. Just because you have diabetes, it doesn’t mean that you have to miss out on all the great bread that life has to offer. In order to be able to eat bread if you have diabetes, there are a few things that you will need to know. Sonya’s Story Sonya sat across from me. She looked defeated. She hung her head low. “I don’t know how I’ll ever give up bread,” she said. “It’s my favorite food. Now that I have Type 2 Diabetes, I know I can’t eat bread, rice, or pasta.” “You can have bread, rice, and pasta in small amounts. I can teach you which kind of breads are best for you, so that you can get some of your favorite food,” I said. “That would be great,” said Sonya. “Wow, I feel a lot better! When can I come to class and learn about this?” “You can come tomorrow,” I said. “I’ll find you some bread recipes that you can make at home with diabetes-friendly ingredients, so that the bread you do eat is healthier. It will also be lower in carbohydrates than some other breads, and the carbohydrates will be good carbohydrates.” Sonya came to class where she learnt valuable information about making diabetes-friendly breads. Now she makes them for herself, and a few other friends with diabetes that she happened to have met in her diabetes classes. Breads with high fibers Breads that are whole grain, and high in fiber, such as oats or bran, are the best type of bread for people with diabetes to eat. While you can have a serving or two of bread, you still need to stay within the Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

Is bread an option for people with diabetes? Food may be one of life’s simple pleasures, but for people with diabetes, deciding what to eat can get complicated. Foods that contain a lot of carbohydrates can spike blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates are found in many different kinds of food, including desserts, grains, and bread. Giving up carbs completely isn’t realistic, healthy, or even necessary. What matters is that you’re aware of your carb intake and make nutritious food choices. Breads can often be high in carbs. Some are overly processed, high in sugar, and filled with empty calories. Healthier options can be part of a satisfying meal plan for people with diabetes. If you’re trying to figure out which breads work best for diabetes management, this information may help. When a person has diabetes, their body doesn’t make or use enough insulin to process food efficiently. Without enough insulin, blood sugar levels can spike. People with diabetes may also have high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. This means that it’s important to keep an eye on fat and sugar intake. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections daily and follow a specific type of eating plan. This eating plan is geared towards keeping blood sugar levels low. People with type 2 diabetes often follow an eating and exercise regimen geared towards reducing blood sugar. If diet and exercise aren’t enough to control blood sugar, insulin injections or oral medication may be a part of a daily regimen. Creating a food plan, making smart nutritional choices, and watching carbohydrate intake is recommended for people with both types of diabetes. Creating a meal plan can help people with diabetes control blood sugar and provide satisfying nutrition. There isn’t a one-size-fits-a Continue reading >>

Is Whole Wheat Bread Good For Blood Sugar?

Is Whole Wheat Bread Good For Blood Sugar?

Your blood sugar fluctuates depending on what you last ate and when you ate it. The products of some foods enter the bloodstream more quickly than others, causing potentially harmful, rapid rises in blood glucose. Whole wheat bread has a more beneficial effect on your blood sugar than breads made with refined grains, since your body digests and absorbs it more slowly. But whole wheat breads can vary considerably in their benefit on blood sugar levels, depending on how much whole wheat they contain and how much sugar manufacturers add. Types of Bread While all bread is made with flour, the type of flour used has an impact on its nutritional value. White bread, made from bleached refined flour, has had its fiber and many nutrients removed during processing. Whole wheat bread, on the other hand, contains the most nutritious parts of the bread: the bran, the endosperm and the germ. White bread is also more likely to have added refined sugars such as high-fructose corn syrup, whose components enter your bloodstream very quickly. Manufacturers in the United States can call their bread "whole wheat" if it contains as little as 51 percent whole grains, according to the American Heart Association. The more whole wheat a bread contains, the more it moderates your blood sugar. Glycemic Index Foods containing carbohydrates, such as sugars and grains, can be categorized by their glycemic index. Foods with a high GI are absorbed more quickly into the bloodstream than those with a low GI. Foods with a lower GI cause a slower rise in blood sugar. For comparison purposes, pure glucose -- the most rapidly absorbed form of sugar -- is assigned a GI value of 100. White bread has a GI of 73, according to Harvard Health Publications. The GI of whole wheat bread varies considerably from brand Continue reading >>

Diabetes: “cured By Wheat Belly”

Diabetes: “cured By Wheat Belly”

Take a look at Mary’s story posted on the Wheat Belly Blog: I used to be diabetic. Now I am not. Cured by Wheat Belly. Fasting blood sugar less then 87 mg/dl consistently. Postprandial [after-meal] readings at one hour at 100 mg/dl or less. HbA1c 5.5. No dietician can tell me any lies about wheat or proper carb intake. I struggled for 10+ years following ADA [American Diabetes Association] diet guidelines. I gained 15+ pounds. I walked 15 miles a week at training heart rate. I stopped all that nonsense because it only produced higher and higher blood sugar numbers, even on metformin and with exercise. Something was obviously wrong and I knew it wasn’t my laziness or overindulgence. It was the horrendous advice that was killing me! Now I avoid carbs with the same dilgence that I avoid dieticians and doctors/nurses who give ADA advice. It doesn’t work and it never will. More people are diagnosed with diabetes and/or obesity every year. And with so many dieticians with such rock-solid advice? Hmm . . . Maybe it’s the dieticians who are propelling people to diabetes and obesity. That was certainly the case for me. Thanks, Mary. Isn’t that wonderful? And, by saying goodbye to wheat, she has done more than “just” lose the diabetes, of course. Let’s be clear on this: Grains and sugars CAUSE type 2 diabetes. Wheat is the worst of all grains and therefore wheat causes diabetes. (Wheat also causes type 1 diabetes, by the way, an entirely different, though VERY disturbing, conversation.) Let us count the ways: 1) The amylopectin A “complex” carbohydrate of wheat, given its unusual susceptibility to digestion by the salivary and stomach enzyme, amylase, raises blood sugar to sky-high levels. You know my line: Two slices of whole wheat bread raise blood sugar hig Continue reading >>

Five Common Grain Myths

Five Common Grain Myths

There’s a good chance that, at one point or another, you’ve wondered about eating certain foods. If you have diabetes, foods that contain carbohydrate (also known as carb) come to mind. And one type of carb food that never fails to spark debate is grains. There’s the camp that disparages most grains, in general, proclaiming that they’re bad for diabetes because they’ll send your blood sugars sky-high. On the more moderate side of things, the argument is that refined grains are to be avoided, but whole grains are OK (in limited amounts). And then there’s the rest of the folks who feel thoroughly confused. Is it OK to eat pasta? What the heck is farro, anyway? Read on to learn more. Whole grains defined According to the Oldways Whole Grains Council, a whole grain has “all three parts of the original grain — the starchy endosperm, the fiber-rich bran, and the germ.” The bran is the outer layer of the grain; the germ is the “embryo,” which contains B vitamins, vitamin E, phytonutrients, antioxidants, and fat, and the endosperm is the germ’s food source that contains carbohydrate, protein, and some vitamins and minerals. Once a food manufacturer starts stripping away any part of a whole grain, it’s no longer, well, whole. Now it’s refined. And that’s when the grain starts to lose many of its healthy attributes. Whole-grain myths People who have diabetes should avoid all grains and grain foods. This particular fallacy stems from the fact that grains contain carbohydrate. Carbohydrate (in many people’s minds) is bad. They raise your blood sugar, right? So, stay away from them. But, it’s not that simple, at least when it comes to grains. As we just learned, whole grains are packed with nutrition — carb, yes, but also some protein, fat, vitami Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Bulgur Wheat With Diabetes?

Can You Eat Bulgur Wheat With Diabetes?

Eat bulgur in moderation and with other healthy foods.Photo Credit: -lvinst-/iStock/Getty Images Natalie Stein specializes in weight loss and sports nutrition. She is based in Los Angeles and is an assistant professor with the Program for Public Health at Michigan State University. Stein holds a master of science degree in nutrition and a master of public health degree from Michigan State University. Bulgur, also called bulgar or bulghur, is a grain product made from crushed wheat kernels. It provides iron, zinc and niacin, and you can eat it as a side dish, in salads and as a hot breakfast cereal. If you have diabetes, you might hesitate to eat bulgur because it is a high-carbohydrate food, but the American Diabetes Association lists bulgur as a healthy grain option for individuals with diabetes. A cup of cooked bulgur contains 34 grams of total carbohydrates. When you eat foods with carbohydrates, your body breaks down the carbohydrates and releases them into your bloodstream as blood sugar, or blood glucose. If you have diabetes, your body is unable to properly regulate your blood sugar levels, and consuming too many carbohydrates at once can cause unhealthy increases in blood sugar. For most people with diabetes, each meal should contain 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates. You could hit this goal with a lunch consisting of tabbouleh, with bulgur, parsley, cucumber, tomatoes, garlic and olive oil, and a piece of fruit on the side. Diabetics are at a higher risk for heart disease. A high-sodium diet can lead to high blood pressure, which further increases your risk. Bulgur is naturally low-sodium, with only 9 grams of sodium per cup of cooked bulgur. Prevent your bulgur dish from becoming higher in sodium by cooking it in water and refraining from adding salt during coo Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

More in diabetes