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Wheat Flour For Diabetics

Flour Power: 5 Options That Are Good For Baking And Diabetes

Flour Power: 5 Options That Are Good For Baking And Diabetes

From whole wheat, to spelt, to almond flour, coconut flour, and even flour made from chickpeas, it's hard to know where to start and easy to become confused about which variety is best for your individual needs. With diabetes, you want to select flour that is slow digested, high in fiber, lower in carbohydrate all without a high level of calories to help maintain blood sugar levels as well as promote a healthy body weight. With all that considered, it may seem easy to just throw your hands up in the air, give up, and resign yourself to never baking again. But don’t worry; I am here to help you sort it out and remove the stress from your next grocery store outing. #1. Whole Wheat Pastry Flour If most of your recipes call for all-purpose flour, refined flour that may elevate blood sugar levels more rapidly than whole grains, you may reach for 100% whole wheat flour as an alternative. Although this switch will certainly boost the fiber and whole grain content of your recipe, the taste and texture may not always remain exactly the same. Whole wheat flour (100%) can have a denser, more course texture than all-purpose flour. As a substitute in breads, it can often work out well, but in baked goods such as cookies and muffins, the final product may not taste as close to the original as you had hoped. Enter whole-wheat pastry flour. This flour, which gives graham crackers their sweet taste, is milled from low-protein soft wheat allowing it to provide a flavorful taste to pastries without the density or coarseness of a standard whole-wheat flour. It is best to use for cookies, piecrusts, and baked goods. A 1/3 cup serving size provides 100 calories, 22 grams of carbohydrate, and 4 grams of fiber. #2. Spelt Flour Another alternative to 100% whole-wheat flour is spelt flour. Spe Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Diabetics

Dietary Recommendations For Diabetics

Whole rye breads are known for their health virtues, such as increment of satiety, assistance to the digestive system function, long term energy, vitamins, many minerals and reduction of the risk of colon and breast cancer. Furthermore, whole rye breads, especially bread from 100% whole rye flour, are extremely recommended for pre diabetic and diabetic patients, why? Written by: Hadas Yariv (M Sc, MBA), food technician and nutrition expert. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, which causes a rise in the blood sugar levels and damages all of the body’s systems. Obesity and diabetes are the main epidemics of the current millennium. In Israel there are 500,000 diabetics and another 200,000 who don’t know they are diabetic and referred to as “pre diabetic patients”. The chance to get diabetes rises in older age up to 40%. Over 95% of diabetics suffer from type 2 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes the insulin discharged from the pancreas isn’t effective enough to insert the sugar into the body cells, or isn’t discharged in a sufficient way. The shortage of sugar evolves gradually, and might not appear for years at all, until it becomes a real life threatening situation. Dietary Recommendations for Diabetics International health organizations recommended for a diabetic/ pre diabetic patient to base their diet on whole grains, vegetables, fruit, legumes, low fat dairy products, chicken and fish (not fried); it is recommended to consume monounsaturated fat from olive oil, nuts, almonds and avocado. On the other hand they should reduce consumption of saturated fat, trans fat, salt and processed meat. We highly recommend on keeping a low calorie diet. Recommendations for Carbs and Whole Grains Consumption: Carbs are the main essential nutrient that affects the levels of blood Continue reading >>

Beat Diabetes With A Wheat, Flour And Rice-free Diet

Beat Diabetes With A Wheat, Flour And Rice-free Diet

With India expected to be home to 80 percent of the world’s diabetic population by 2025, the buzzword is ‘low glycemic load foods’. The glycemic index or GI is a measure of the effects of carbohydrate on blood sugar level. Studies have proved that people who eat low-glycemic food over several years are less prone to type 2 diabetes and coronary heart diseases than those who love their morning platter of ‘parantha, poori and roti (Indian breads)’ – the high glycemic delights. ‘The meals should be kept free of flour, cornflakes, wheat and rice,’ Gaurav Sharma, a diabetologist, sports medicine and lifestyle doctor told. They can kill with excess starch and gluten allergy, the newest wheat allergen on the pantry shelf which can aggravate the condition of diabetics. ‘An ideal anti-diabetic breakfast, the most important meal of the day, should be a combination of eggs – fried, poached or scrambled in extra-virgin olive oil – accompanied by a tomato or mint dip followed by herbal or jasmine tea,’ he added. Eggs do not increase cholesterol; the popular perception of eggs as a potential source of cholesterol is a myth, said the doctor who has treated several top sportspersons including Kapil Dev. Sharma, who has been practising lifestyle medicine for the last two decades, has designed several anti-diabetes diet plans. ‘Every Indian family with or without a history of diabetes must use at least three different varieties of cooking oils rich in the essential Omega-3 fatty acids, which help production of natural insulin,’ the doctor said. ‘They can be olive oil, mustard oil, clarified butter, coconut oil or flaxseed oil,’ he added. Read more about causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. Breakfast is ideally followed by a light snack of Continue reading >>

Low-carb Flour For Diabetes

Low-carb Flour For Diabetes

Controlling your carbohydrate intake is the best way to optimize your diabetes control. Eating too many carbs at once can make your blood sugar levels go on a roller coaster, making it more difficult for you to manage your diabetes. Foods made from grains and flours, such as bread, pasta, cookies, cakes, muffins, croissants, pies, pancakes and other baked goods, are a huge source of carbohydrates in the standard American diet. Using flours with a lower carbohydrate content can help you enjoy your favorite foods without compromising your blood sugar levels. Video of the Day Coconut flour is made from the coconut meat after most its fat has been extracted to produce coconut oil. Coconut flour has a low carb content and is rich in fiber, in addition to being gluten-free. You will need to modify your recipes to add more liquid as the fiber absorb a lot of water. Each 1/4 cup of coconut flour contains 60 calories, 2.5 g of fat, 6 g of protein, 19 g of carbohydrates and 12 g of fiber. With diabetes, you only need to consider net carbs, which corresponds to the total carbs minus the fiber. Net carbs are the carbs that can raise your blood sugar levels -- fiber cannot. In the case of coconut flour, its net carb content corresponds to 7 g per 1/4-cup serving. In comparison, the same serving of all-purpose wheat flour contains 24 g of carbohydrates and 0.8 g of fiber, or 23.2 g of net carbs; and 1/4 cup of whole-wheat flour has 22 g of carbs and 3.2 g of fiber, or 18.8 g of net carbs. Another simple way to make a low-carb flour that won't make your blood sugar levels shoot above the desirable range is to use almond meal. You can make your own by grinding almonds until you get a fine flour-like consistency. Don't grind for too long or you will get almond butter. You can use almond Continue reading >>

Healthy Baking: Flour Substitutes

Healthy Baking: Flour Substitutes

With a name like "all-purpose," it's no wonder basic white flour can keep bakers in a one-type rut. But when other options offer both good taste and better nutrition, there's no reason to stick with only one flour variety. See how whole grain flours, whole wheat flours, and gluten-free flours can work for you. With a name like "all-purpose," it's no wonder basic white flour can keep bakers in a one-type rut. But when other options offer both good taste and better nutrition, there's no reason to stick with only one flour variety. See how whole grain flours, whole wheat flours, and gluten-free flours can work for you. With a name like "all-purpose," it's no wonder basic white flour can keep bakers in a one-type rut. But when other options offer both good taste and better nutrition, there's no reason to stick with only one flour variety. See how whole grain flours, whole wheat flours, and gluten-free flours can work for you. With a name like "all-purpose," it's no wonder basic white flour can keep bakers in a one-type rut. But when other options offer both good taste and better nutrition, there's no reason to stick with only one flour variety. See how whole grain flours, whole wheat flours, and gluten-free flours can work for you. Continue reading >>

Is Whole Wheat Bread Good For Blood Sugar?

Is Whole Wheat Bread Good For Blood Sugar?

Your blood sugar fluctuates depending on what you last ate and when you ate it. The products of some foods enter the bloodstream more quickly than others, causing potentially harmful, rapid rises in blood glucose. Whole wheat bread has a more beneficial effect on your blood sugar than breads made with refined grains, since your body digests and absorbs it more slowly. But whole wheat breads can vary considerably in their benefit on blood sugar levels, depending on how much whole wheat they contain and how much sugar manufacturers add. Types of Bread While all bread is made with flour, the type of flour used has an impact on its nutritional value. White bread, made from bleached refined flour, has had its fiber and many nutrients removed during processing. Whole wheat bread, on the other hand, contains the most nutritious parts of the bread: the bran, the endosperm and the germ. White bread is also more likely to have added refined sugars such as high-fructose corn syrup, whose components enter your bloodstream very quickly. Manufacturers in the United States can call their bread "whole wheat" if it contains as little as 51 percent whole grains, according to the American Heart Association. The more whole wheat a bread contains, the more it moderates your blood sugar. Glycemic Index Foods containing carbohydrates, such as sugars and grains, can be categorized by their glycemic index. Foods with a high GI are absorbed more quickly into the bloodstream than those with a low GI. Foods with a lower GI cause a slower rise in blood sugar. For comparison purposes, pure glucose -- the most rapidly absorbed form of sugar -- is assigned a GI value of 100. White bread has a GI of 73, according to Harvard Health Publications. The GI of whole wheat bread varies considerably from brand Continue reading >>

Five Common Grain Myths

Five Common Grain Myths

There’s a good chance that, at one point or another, you’ve wondered about eating certain foods. If you have diabetes, foods that contain carbohydrate (also known as carb) come to mind. And one type of carb food that never fails to spark debate is grains. There’s the camp that disparages most grains, in general, proclaiming that they’re bad for diabetes because they’ll send your blood sugars sky-high. On the more moderate side of things, the argument is that refined grains are to be avoided, but whole grains are OK (in limited amounts). And then there’s the rest of the folks who feel thoroughly confused. Is it OK to eat pasta? What the heck is farro, anyway? Read on to learn more. Whole grains defined According to the Oldways Whole Grains Council, a whole grain has “all three parts of the original grain — the starchy endosperm, the fiber-rich bran, and the germ.” The bran is the outer layer of the grain; the germ is the “embryo,” which contains B vitamins, vitamin E, phytonutrients, antioxidants, and fat, and the endosperm is the germ’s food source that contains carbohydrate, protein, and some vitamins and minerals. Once a food manufacturer starts stripping away any part of a whole grain, it’s no longer, well, whole. Now it’s refined. And that’s when the grain starts to lose many of its healthy attributes. Whole-grain myths People who have diabetes should avoid all grains and grain foods. This particular fallacy stems from the fact that grains contain carbohydrate. Carbohydrate (in many people’s minds) is bad. They raise your blood sugar, right? So, stay away from them. But, it’s not that simple, at least when it comes to grains. As we just learned, whole grains are packed with nutrition — carb, yes, but also some protein, fat, vitami Continue reading >>

Diabetes Power Foods: Whole Grains And Fiber

Diabetes Power Foods: Whole Grains And Fiber

Imagine this food: It's low in calories. It makes you feel full. And you can eat as much of it as you want. Too good to be true? It's fiber and it is real. You can find it in fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and whole grains. Most everyone should eat more fiber -- especially if you have diabetes. Even though fiber is a carbohydrate, your body can’t break it down. This means you don’t digest fiber, and it doesn't raise your blood sugar. And as fiber moves through your body, it helps with digestion, makes you feel full, and may help control your cholesterol and blood sugar levels. How Much Fiber? Think you eat enough fiber? Chances are you could stand to eat more. Men over age 50 should get at least 30 grams of fiber each day and women over 50 at least 21 grams daily. Most of us get less than recommended. There are lots of delicious ways to add fiber to your diet, but the key is to do it slowly. This will help prevent gas and bloating. Drinking more water can help, too. Eat Your Whole Grains Whole grains are loaded with fiber. Look for breads, cereals, tortillas, and crackers that have whole wheat flour, whole-grain cornmeal, whole oats, whole rye, or buckwheat flour on the ingredients list. Here are some tasty ways to add more whole grains to your diet: Start the day with a half-cup of high-fiber bran cereal topped with banana slices or berries (12 grams of fiber) or a whole wheat English muffin (4.4 grams). Choose whole wheat pasta (3 grams) over white. Serve it with your favorite vegetables for even more fiber. Make a sandwich on whole-grain bread. (Chose bread with 2 or 3 grams of fiber a slice.) Try recipes that use other types of whole grains, such as barley or bulgur (3 to 4 grams). Have brown rice or wild rice (3.5 grams) instead of white. Sprinkle with fres Continue reading >>

Wheat For Diabetes

Wheat For Diabetes

All over the world, wheat is one of the most important crops that is both cultivated and consumed. In America, wheat is included in a number of recipes ranging from bread to pasta, cakes to cookies, and pies to pizzas. The best way to maximize the benefits of this wholesome grain is to have it unrefined. When wheat is refined, it is basically stripped of all its major nutrients. Wheat thus consumed, just adds calories without any of its natural goodness. The health benefits of wheat are many. Whole wheat is rich in vitamins B1, B2, and B3 along with zinc, iron, calcium, magnesium, folic acid, phosphorus and fiber. Whole wheat products retain all these nutrients and help keep a host of health problems in check. A lot of research has been conducted on wheat for diabetes. The magnesium content in wheat is believed to be responsible for activating enzymes in the body that balance out insulin production and glucose levels. When the body fails to produce enough insulin to break down the sugar in the food you eat, high blood sugar and diabetes can develop. Eating a diet rich in wheat is very beneficial for diabetics. If you choose whole wheat products such as wheat bread, wheat flour and broken wheat for diabetics, you are essentially providing the body with the means to control cholesterol and reduce fat. This in turn can prevent diabetes from developing. Recent studies show that eating a diet rich in whole grains can lower your risk of diabetes significantly. Complex carbohydrates provided by whole wheat products help burn more calories and lose weight over time by keeping you fuller for longer. Carbohydrates are also necessary for the proper functioning of the digestive system and the elimination of waste. Every time you choose a wheat product, make sure you choose items th Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Diabetes is a metabolic disease, meaning there is a glitch in the way the body converts food energy into usable energy. A healthy reaction to eating carbohydrate is a rise in blood sugar (glucose) followed by insulin being released as a response. The insulin acts as a key to open up cells within the brain and organs to let glucose in to be used as an immediate source of energy. Any unused energy is then stored in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Someone with diabetes has a rise in blood glucose but insulin is either not released or cells are resistant to the insulin. This is why diabetics have difficulty returning their high blood sugar levels back down to normal and thus need to control how much carbohydrate (glucose source) they put into their body throughout the day. Control carbohydrates. With a little effort and control diabetes can easily be managed. Diabetics should not condemn, but rather control carbohydrates. They should focus on allowing their body only the amount of carbohydrates it can handle at one time (this can be determined by a doctor or registered dietitian). Despite being diabetic, the body still needs and uses carbohydrates as its preferred source of energy. In fact, it is the only source of fuel for the brain! So it should never be eliminated, just merely controlled so your body can handle the glucose load. Stick to an eating plan. There is no single ideal eating plan for those with diabetes; the recommended plan is specific to a person’s weight, medication, blood sugars, cholesterol, and other medical conditions or concerns. Despite the varying eating plans, all diabetics should be consistent with their eating habits. Also, they need to eat about every 4-5 hours to prevent blood sugars from getting too low. Additionally, breakfast is an impor Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

You’ve probably noticed a lot of food packages on grocery store shelves with gluten-free labels. If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if gluten is something you should avoid. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains. These include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten can cause inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease. This can result in symptoms that include: It’s necessary to follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease. Some symptoms of celiac disease are experienced by people with a condition known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). These people don’t experience the same kind of injury and irritation to the small intestine as those with celiac disease, but gluten intolerance can still cause physical and mental problems. Intolerance to other components of gluten-containing foods — such as FODMAPs, a group of fermentable carbohydrates — may cause physical or mental problems. NCGS can sometimes lead to fuzzy thinking and depression. About 1 in 100 people have celiac disease, but about 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Research suggests that there may be a genetic link between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. Certain biomarkers in your blood that make you more likely to have celiac disease may increase your risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Both conditions have an inflammatory component, which causes the immune system to attack the body’s tissues or organs, such as the intestines or pancreas. There doesn’t appear to be a connection between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Gluten is found in many high-carb foods because they are often grain-based. High-carb foods can raise your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

Is bread an option for people with diabetes? Food may be one of life’s simple pleasures, but for people with diabetes, deciding what to eat can get complicated. Foods that contain a lot of carbohydrates can spike blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates are found in many different kinds of food, including desserts, grains, and bread. Giving up carbs completely isn’t realistic, healthy, or even necessary. What matters is that you’re aware of your carb intake and make nutritious food choices. Breads can often be high in carbs. Some are overly processed, high in sugar, and filled with empty calories. Healthier options can be part of a satisfying meal plan for people with diabetes. If you’re trying to figure out which breads work best for diabetes management, this information may help. When a person has diabetes, their body doesn’t make or use enough insulin to process food efficiently. Without enough insulin, blood sugar levels can spike. People with diabetes may also have high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. This means that it’s important to keep an eye on fat and sugar intake. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections daily and follow a specific type of eating plan. This eating plan is geared towards keeping blood sugar levels low. People with type 2 diabetes often follow an eating and exercise regimen geared towards reducing blood sugar. If diet and exercise aren’t enough to control blood sugar, insulin injections or oral medication may be a part of a daily regimen. Creating a food plan, making smart nutritional choices, and watching carbohydrate intake is recommended for people with both types of diabetes. Creating a meal plan can help people with diabetes control blood sugar and provide satisfying nutrition. There isn’t a one-size-fits-a Continue reading >>

Which Is Better For A Diabetic: Chapati Or Rice?

Which Is Better For A Diabetic: Chapati Or Rice?

Diabetics need to be especially careful of their dietary choices because they are unable to naturally control blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetics don’t produce enough insulin, which is needed to shuttle glucose from the bloodstream into cells. In contrast, type 2 diabetics produce enough insulin but their cells are resistant to its affect. Common Indian foods such as chapati and rice can be eaten by diabetics in moderation, but different varieties are better suited to diabetic diets because they have lower glycemic indexes. Consult your doctor about the importance of choosing foods with a low glycemic index. Video of the Day Carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables and grains are not metabolized into glucose at the same rate. Some are quickly digested, causing spikes in blood glucose and insulin release, while others are broken down more slowly, which impacts blood sugar and insulin levels to a much lesser degree. The glycemic index is a comparative measure of how quickly a carbohydrate is reduced into glucose. In general, foods with index values of 55 or less have low impact on blood sugar levels and are considered most appropriate for diabetics. Index values between 56 and 69 are considered to have a moderate impact on blood glucose and insulin, whereas values of 70 or greater represent significant impact. The glycemic index of rice depends on whether the grain is polished or not, whereas the index of chapati depends on the type of flour used. Rice for Diabetics Diabetics can safely eat all types of rice, although their portions should be moderated. In the production of brown rice, only the outermost hull is removed from the rice kernel. White rice is further milled, processed and polished, which reduces the nutritional value of the grain. In addition to containing Continue reading >>

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

When it comes to flours, making the right choice is very important to blood sugar control. So we've gathered some great info here for you to use in your kitchen and menu preparations. Are Grains & Flour Really Good For Fiber? We've often been told that eating whole grains is a great source of fiber. And while ‘whole grains' do provide some fiber they are not the only thing that provide us with our daily fiber needs, vegetables do too. For example: 1 slice of wholewheat bread has 1.9 g of fiber, while a carrot has 2.3 g. All grains and vegetables do range in fiber content, but vegetables are a great source of daily fiber and are also higher in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants than grains. So we don't have to eat grains in order to get adequate fiber. Changing A Grain Into A Flour Changes The Way It Affects Blood Sugar Often when we take a grain and make it into flour, it changes the carb and fiber content. So what tends to happen for you as a diabetic is that most types of flours will make your blood sugar spike like wild fire. At least that's what most people experience, which is why our meal plans contain virtually no grain flours at all. An example of this is buckwheat. Eaten whole it has a glycemic index (GI) of around 49, which is a low GI. But take it and turn it into bread and it changes to a GI of 67, meaning it affects your blood sugar more rapidly and more intensely than eating the whole grain itself. Here is another example using wheat. Whole wheat kernals are a very low GI of 30, but we don't tend to eat whole wheat kernals, we eat whole wheat flour and it has an average GI of around 74. Whole Grain Flours Are A Better Option It's true that whole grains are better as far as nutrition goes. As the Minnesota Department of Health explains, the whole grain Continue reading >>

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