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What's The Maximum Dose Of Metformin

Metformin For Gestational Diabetes: As Safe And As Effective As Insulin?

Metformin For Gestational Diabetes: As Safe And As Effective As Insulin?

Metformin for gestational diabetes: As safe and as effective as insulin? Rowan JA, Hague WM, Gao W, Battin MR, Moore MP, for the MiG Trial Investigators. Metformin versus insulin for the treatment of gestational diabetes. N Engl J Med. 2008;358:20032015. Professor and Chairman, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Penn State University College of Medicine, and Obstetrician-Gynecologist-in-Chief, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pa. Dr. Repke serves on the OBG Management Board of Editors. Compared with insulin, metformin did not increase the risk of perinatal complications and was preferred by most women YES. In this open-label randomized trial comparing metformin, with or without supplemental insulin, with insulin alone, metformin did not increase the risk of perinatal complications and was preferred by a majority of women. Rowan and colleagues add to the data on the potential benefits of oral hypoglycemic agents, compared with insulin, in managing gestational diabetes. The presumption was that dietary treatment alone would not result in adequate glycemic control. In the study, women assigned to metformin were given a starting dosage of 500 mg once or twice daily, which was then increased to a maximum daily dosage of 2,500 mg. According to the authors, women assigned to insulin were prescribed the drug according to usual practice, although that practice was never defined. In addition, if adequate glycemic control was not achieved in the metformin group, insulin was added. Overall, 363 of the women who received metformin completed the study, with 195 receiving metformin alone and 168 ultimately receiving metformin plus insulin. In the other arm, 370 of the women assigned to insulin completed the study. Maternal baseline characteristics were the same for bo Continue reading >>

Metformin Dosage

Metformin Dosage

There have been no human studies to identify the optimal dose of metformin that is needed to duplicate the beneficial gene expression effects that are described in the June 2003 issue of Life Extension magazine . For people who want to derive the many proven health benefits of metformin, it might be prudent to follow the dosage schedule used by Type II diabetics. According to the Physician's Desk Reference, the starting dose should be 500 mg of metformin twice a day. (An alternative option is 850 mg of metformin once a day). After one week, increase the dose of metformin to 1000 mg as the first dose of the day and 500 mg as the second dose. After another week, increase to 1000 mg of metformin two times a day. The maximum safe dose described in the Physician's Desk Reference is 2550 mg a day (which should be taken as 850 mg three times a day). According to the Physician's Desk Reference, clinically significant responses in Type II diabetics are not seen at doses below 1500 mg a day of metformin. Anti-aging doctors, on the other hand, have recommended doses as low as 500 mg twice a day to healthy non-diabetics who are seeking to obtain metformin's other proven benefits such as enhancing insulin sensitivity and reducing excess levels of insulin, glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood. It could be the dosage range is highly individualistic in healthy people, meaning some may benefit from 500 mg twice a day, while others may need 1000 mg twice a day for optimal effects. Blood tests to ascertain if the dose of metformin you are taking is improving glucose/insulin metabolism would be: Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Safe Prescribing Of Metformin In Diabetes

Safe Prescribing Of Metformin In Diabetes

Metformin is the first-line pharmacological therapy for type 2 diabetes. It is the only glucose-lowering oral drug that has been shown to reduce mortality in patients with diabetes. The most common adverse effect is gastrointestinal upset. Starting at a low dose and increasing it slowly reduces this risk. Taking metformin with food also helps. Numerous contraindications to the use of metformin are listed in the product information, including reduced renal function. Strict adherence to these recommendations may deny a valuable drug to many patients. Introduction Metformin lowers both fasting and postprandial blood glucose. It reduces hepatic glucose output 1 and increases peripheral glucose uptake, and may delay intestinal glucose absorption. Its use is not associated with weight gain and hypoglycaemia is extremely rare when metformin is used on its own. It lowers triglyceride concentrations and has small but beneficial effects on total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the UK Prospective Diabetes Study metformin reduced diabetes-related and all-cause mortality, and reduced the risk of myocardial infarction in obese patients with type 2 diabetes when used as first-line therapy. It also reduced the risk of microvascular complications, but was no more effective than insulin or sulfonylureas. 2 A retrospective cohort study from the USA found a lower rate of hospitalisations for myocardial infarction and stroke and a reduced death rate when metformin was used first-line in type 2 diabetes in comparison with a sulfonylurea. 3 Metformin is effective when used with other glucose-lowering drugs. A standard-release (3000 mg/day maximum dose) and an extended-release preparation of metformin (2000 mg/day maximum dose) are available. The extended-release preparation can b Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the top of the line medication option for Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. If you must start taking medication for your newly diagnosed condition, it is then likely that your healthcare provider will prescribe this medication. Taking care of beta cells is an important thing. If you help to shield them from demise, they will keep your blood sugar down. This medication is important for your beta cell safety if you have Type 2 Diabetes. Not only does Metformin lower blood sugar and decrease resistance of insulin at the cellular level, it improves cell functioning, lipids, and how fat is distributed in our bodies. Increasing evidence in research points to Metformin’s effects on decreasing the replication of cancer cells, and providing a protective action for the neurological system. Let’s find out why Lori didn’t want to take Metformin. After learning about the benefits of going on Metformin, she changed her mind. Lori’s Story Lori came in worrying. Her doctor had placed her on Metformin, but she didn’t want to get the prescription filled. “I don’t want to go on diabetes medicine,” said Lori. “If I go on pills, next it will be shots. I don’t want to end up like my dad who took four shots a day.” “The doctor wants you on Metformin now to protect cells in your pancreas, so they can make more insulin. With diet and exercise, at your age, you can reverse the diagnosis. Would you like to talk about how we can work together to accomplish that?” “Reverse?” she asked. “What do you mean reverse? Will I not have Type 2 Diabetes anymore?” “You will always have it, but if you want to put it in remission, you are certainly young enough to do so. Your doctor wants to protect your beta cells in the pancreas. If you take the new medication, Continue reading >>

Quantifying The Effect Of Metformin Treatment And Dose On Glycemic Control

Quantifying The Effect Of Metformin Treatment And Dose On Glycemic Control

Quantifying the Effect of Metformin Treatment and Dose on Glycemic Control Jennifer A. Hirst , MSC,1 Andrew J. Farmer , MD,1 Raghib Ali , MSC,2,3 Nia W. Roberts , MSC,4 and Richard J. Stevens , PHD1 1Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K., and the National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research, Oxford, U.K. 1Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K., and the National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research, Oxford, U.K. 2Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K. 3Department of Community Medicine, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates 1Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K., and the National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research, Oxford, U.K. 1Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K., and the National Institute for Health Research School for Primary Care Research, Oxford, U.K. 2Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K. 3Department of Community Medicine, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates 4Bodleian Health Care Libraries, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K. Corresponding author: Jennifer A. Hirst, [email protected] . Received 2011 Aug 3; Accepted 2011 Oct 31. Copyright 2012 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Metformin is the first-line oral medication recommended for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. We reviewed the literatur Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Glucophage, Glucophage Xr (metformin) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Glucophage, Glucophage Xr (metformin) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Initial: 500 mg PO q12hr or 850 mg PO qDay with meals; increase q2Weeks Maintenance: 1500-2550 mg/day PO divided q8-12hr with meal Glucophage XR: 500 mg PO qDay with dinner; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2000 mg/day Fortamet: 500-1000 mg PO qDay; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2500 mg/day Glumetza: 1000 mg PO qDay; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2000 mg/day Hepatic impairment: Avoid use; risk of lactic acidosis eGFR 30-45 mL/min/1.73 m: Not recommended to initiate treatment Monitor eGFR at least annually or more often for those at risk for renal impairment (eg, elderly) If eGFR falls below 45mL/min/1.73 m while taking metformin, risks and benefits of continuing therapy should be evaluated If eGFR falls below 30 mL/min/1.73 m: while taking metformin, discontinue the drug Orphan designation for treatment of pediatric polycystic ovary syndrome EffRx Pharmaceuticals SA; Wolleraustrass 41 B; 8807 Freienbach (SZ); SWITZERLAND Orphan designation for treatment of progressive myoclonus epilepsy type 2 (Lafora disease) Consorcio Centro de Investigacin Biomdica en Red, M.P. (CIBER); Monforte de Lemos, 3-5 Pabellon 11; Madrid, Spain Maintenance: Titrate qWeek by 500 mg; no more than 2000 mg/day in divided doses Initial: 500 mg PO q12hr or 850 mg PO qDay with meals; increase q2Weeks Maintenance: 1500-2550 mg/day PO divided q8-12hr with meal Glucophage XR: 500 mg PO qDay with dinner; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2000 mg/day Fortamet: 500-1000 mg PO qDay; titrate by 500 mg/day qWeek; not to exceed 2500 mg/day eGFR 30-45 mL/min/1.73 m: Initiating not recommended Obtain GFR at least annually in all patients taking metformin; assess eGFR more frequently in patients at increased risk for renal impairment (eg, elderly) If eGFR falls to <4 Continue reading >>

Metformin | The Johns Hopkins Patient Guide To Diabetes

Metformin | The Johns Hopkins Patient Guide To Diabetes

Metformin primarily reduces the liver s ability to releaseglucose from its stores. Metformin is usually taken with meals, either once or twice a day depending on the brand. Available dosage of pills include 500 mg, 850 mg, and 1000 mg. The treatment plan will differ for each patient, but a common starting regimen is listed below: To avoid stomach upset, patients usually start with a very low dose (500 mg), taken with dinner. After a few weeks, the dose may increase to 500 mg with breakfast and 500 mg with dinner. A few weeks later, the dose may increase again to 500 mg with breakfast and 1 g with dinner. If the patient has no side effects, the dose mayincrease to 1000 mg with breakfast and 1000 mg with dinner. This is usually the maximum dose. Metformin is the treatment of choice for type 2 diabetes because it works well, is inexpensive, and it has been around for decades. Patients may lose a few pounds of weighton metformin. Metformin is very effective at controlling blood glucose and lowers A1c levels by as much as 2% at maximum doses. By itself, metformin does not usually cause low blood glucose. Side effects including diarrhea. However, a slow increase in doses or extended release preparations can often prevent this. In rare cases, metformin can have a serious adverse side effectcalled lactic acidosis , where the body produces potentially dangerous levels of lactic acid. This condition is rare, and occurs more commonly in personswho are olderor havefrom heart failure , history of heavy alcohol use, or advanced kidney disease. To prevent serious kidney damage, patients generally shouldNOT take metformin for 24 hours beforeor 48 hours afterreceiving IV contrast for a CT scan . Patients with mild-to-moderate liver or kidney problems may need to take reduced doses of m Continue reading >>

Effects Of Dosage And Dosing Frequency On The Efficacy And Safety Of Highdose Metformin In Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effects Of Dosage And Dosing Frequency On The Efficacy And Safety Of Highdose Metformin In Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effects of dosage and dosing frequency on the efficacy and safety of highdose metformin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Kindai University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka, Japan Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Kindai University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka, Japan Please review our Terms and Conditions of Use and check box below to share full-text version of article. I have read and accept the Wiley Online Library Terms and Conditions of Use. Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Learn more. Differences in the efficacy and safety of antidiabetic drugs among different ethnic groups are well documented. Metformin is widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes in Western countries, but high doses of metformin have been approved only recently for clinical use in Japan. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dosage and dosing frequency on the efficacy and safety of highdose metformin in Japanese patients. A total of 71 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes were prospectively studied for the effects of dosage and dosing frequency on the efficacy and safety of metformin during hospitalization. Dose effects were studied in 27 patients treated with 0, 500, 1,000, 1,500 and 2,250 mg/day of metformin. The effect of dosing frequency was compared in 56 patients with 1,500 mg/day of metformin administered either two or three times per day. Significant dosedependent improvement in daily profiles of blood glucose was observed with metformin dosages up to 1,500 mg/day, with a trend towards further improvement observed at 2,250 mg/day. The efficacy of 1,500 mg of metformin was comparable when the drug was administe Continue reading >>

Fortamet

Fortamet

FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets DESCRIPTION FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets contain an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N, Ndimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is a member of the biguanide class of oral antihyperglycemics and is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other class of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The empirical formula of metformin hydrochloride is C4H11N5•HCl and its molecular weight is 165.63. Its structural formula is: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. FORTAMET® Extended-Release Tablets are designed for once-a-day oral administration and deliver 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. In addition to the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: candellila wax, cellulose acetate, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, PEG 8000), polysorbate 80, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate, synthetic black iron oxides, titanium dioxide, and triacetin. FORTAMET® meets USP Dissolution Test 5. System Components And Performance FORTAMET® was developed as an extended-release formulation of metformin hydrochloride and designed for once-a-day oral administration using the patented single-composition osmotic technology (SCOT™). The tablet is similar in appearance to other film-coated oral administered tablets but it consists of an osmotically active core formulation that is surrounded by a semipermeable membra Continue reading >>

Metformin Dosage

Metformin Dosage

Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Type 2 Immediate-release: Initial dose: 500 mg orally twice a day or 850 mg orally once a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments or 850 mg every 2 weeks as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily in divided doses Maximum dose: 2550 mg/day Extended-release: Initial dose: 500 to 1000 mg orally once a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily Maximum dose: 2500 mg daily Comments: -Metformin, if not contraindicated, is the preferred initial pharmacologic agent for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. -Immediate-release: Take in divided doses 2 to 3 times a day with meals; titrate slowly to minimize gastrointestinal side effects. In general, significant responses are not observed with doses less than 1500 mg/day. -Extended-release: Take with the evening meal; if glycemic control is not achieved with 2000 mg once a day, may consider 1000 mg of extended-release product twice a day; if glycemic control is still not achieve, may switch to immediate-release product. Use: To improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise. Usual Pediatric Dose for Diabetes Type 2 10 years or older: Immediate-release: Initial dose: 500 mg orally twice a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily Maximum dose: 2000 mg daily Comments: Take in divided doses 2 to 3 times a day with meals. Titrate slowly to minimize gastrointestinal side effects. Safety and effectiveness of metformin extended-release has not been established in pediatric patients less than 18 years of age. Use: To improve glycemic control in children with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise. Le Continue reading >>

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage SR 500mg, 750mg and 1000mg prolonged release tablets This information is intended for use by health professionals Glucophage SR 500 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 750 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 1000 mg prolonged release tablets 2. Qualitative and quantitative composition 500 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 500mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 390 mg metformin base. 750 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 750 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 585 mg metformin base. 1000 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 1000 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 780 mg metformin base. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. 500 mg: White to off-white, round, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '500'. 750 mg: White capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '750' and on the other side with 'Merck'. 1000 mg: White to off-white capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '1000' and on the other side with 'MERCK'. Reduction in the risk or delay of the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adult, overweight patients with IGT* and/or IFG*, and/or increased HbA1C who are: - at high risk for developing overt type 2 diabetes mellitus (see section 5.1) and - still progressing towards type 2 diabetes mellitus despite implementation of intensive lifestyle change for 3 to 6 months Treatment with Glucophage SR must be based on a risk score incorporating appropriate measures of glycaemic control and including evidence of high cardiovascular risk (see section 5.1). Lifestyle modifications should be continued when metformin is initiated, unless the patient is unable to do so because of medical reasons. *IGT: Impaired Glucose Tolerance; IFG: Impaired Fasting Glucose Trea Continue reading >>

High-dose Metformin Safe, Effective In Japanese Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

High-dose Metformin Safe, Effective In Japanese Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

In Japanese adults with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, high doses of metformin administered twice or three times daily improved fasting plasma glucose and 24-hour glycemic profile in a dose-dependent fashion, according to findings reported in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation. “While the usual dosage of metformin is over 2,000 mg per day in Europe and the USA, the maximum dose allowed for clinical use in Japan has long been limited to 750 mg per day, which is less than half that of Western countries,” Hiroshi Ikegami, MD, PhD, of the department of endocrinology, metabolism and diabetes at Kindai University in Osaka, Japan, and colleagues wrote. “In addition, the recommended prescription of the maximum dose of metformin in Japan (750 mg per day) has been via 250-mg tablets administered three times per day. ... These differences in dosage and dosing frequency of metformin between Japan and Western countries have made it difficult to translate the results of clinical trials in Western countries to Japanese patients.” In two prospective studies, Ikegami and colleagues analyzed data from 71 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes recruited between August 2011 and October 2016 from Kindai University Hospital (39 men; mean age, 61 years; mean BMI, 27 kg/m²; mean diabetes duration, 8.4 years; mean FPG, 7.5 mmol/L). All patients were provided standard meals recommended by the Japan Diabetes Society, and treatment with metformin was not initiated until patient FPG reached 11 mmol/L or less, to minimize the confounding effect of an initial improvement in glycemic control due to hospitalization. In the total cohort, 14 patients were treated with metformin monotherapy, whereas 54 patients were prescribed metformin as an add-on therapy to other antidiabetes medication Continue reading >>

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