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Whats The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes: Which One Is Worse?

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes: Which One Is Worse?

What are the differences between the causes of type 1 and type 2? The underlying causes of type 1 and type 2 are different. Type 1 diabetes causes Type 1 diabetes is believed to be due to an autoimmune process, in which the body's immune system mistakenly targets its own tissues (islet cells in the pancreas). In people with type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas that are responsible for insulin production are attacked by the misdirected immune system. This tendency for the immune system to destroy the beta cells of the pancreas is likely to be, at least in part, genetically inherited, although the exact reasons that this process happens are not fully understood. Exposure to certain viral infections (mumps and Coxsackie viruses) or other environmental toxins have been suggested as possible reasons why the abnormal antibody responses develop that cause damage to the pancreas cells. The primary problem in type 2 diabetes is the inability of the body's cells to use insulin properly and efficiently, leading to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and diabetes. This problem affects mostly the cells of muscle and fat tissues, and results in a condition known as insulin resistance. In type 2 diabetes, there also is a steady decline of beta cells that worsens the process of elevated blood sugars. At the beginning, if someone is resistant to insulin, the body can at least partially increase production of insulin enough to overcome the level of resistance. Over time, if production decreases and enough insulin cannot be released, blood sugar levels rise. In many cases this actually means the pancreas produces larger than normal quantities of insulin, but the body is not able to use it effectively. A major feature of type 2 diabetes is a lack of sensitivity to insulin by the ce Continue reading >>

Here’s The Difference Between Pre-diabetes, Type 1 And Type 2

Here’s The Difference Between Pre-diabetes, Type 1 And Type 2

The American Diabetes Association estimates that almost 30 million Americans are diabetic, while an additional 86 million are considered pre-diabetic, and the incidence continues to increase at alarming rates. If you’ve been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not quite high enough for you to be considered diabetic. When an individual has pre-diabetes, it also means they are beginning to develop insulin resistance. Insulin resistance slows the flow of glucose to the cells, causing a back-up of sugar in the blood. If you are diagnosed with pre-diabetes and you don’t begin making important lifestyle changes, you could develop Type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, pre-diabetes can be delayed or even reversed by making lifestyle changes. Regular physical activity and weight loss are some of the best things you can do to prevent the onset of diabetes. Only five percent of diabetes in the United States is considered Type 1, where the body makes very little or no insulin. Insulin is the hormone needed to move glucose from the blood into the body cells to provide energy. Type 1 diabetes is treated by adding insulin back into the body either through injections or an insulin pump. Regularly checking your blood sugar level and being conscious of what you are eating are important practices for managing type 1 diabetes. In terms of diet, this means avoiding sweets, eating low fat and controlling portion sizes, especially carbohydrates. Approximately 90 percent of diabetes diagnosed in the United States is Type 2, which is when your body does not make enough insulin and becomes insulin-resistant. Type 2 diabetes commonly presents itself without symptoms; however, high blood sugar symptoms can include frequent urination, unusual thirst, extreme Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

The majority of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. This is a disease where there are two different deficits. The body is not making enough insulin, and the body is resistant to the effects of the insulin that it does make. Type 2 diabetes typically affects older individuals. Most people with type 2 have a genetic risk that's aggravated by lifestyle issues such as lack of activity or dietary habits. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The body basically turns against its own pancreas and the cells that make insulin are no longer functional. So, these individuals always rely on insulin for treatment as opposed to type 2 patients, who can respond very successfully to pills or a combination of insulin and pills. Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider. Type 1 diabetes is, like type 2, a disease of high blood sugar, but there are some differences. In this video, endocrinologist Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD, of Scripps Health, explains how type 2 diabetes differs in its symptoms and treatment. Diabetes is marked by high levels of sugar in the blood. Most of the 24 million Americans with this condition have type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin (the hormone made by the pancreas that enables cells to draw sugar from the blood for energy) and does not produce enough insulin to overcome the resistance. Although the exact cause of type 2 diabetes isn't clear, one thing is certain: excess body fat is the No. 1 risk factor. T Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1, Type 2, And Gestational Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1, Type 2, And Gestational Diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, which is a hormone that helps the body use or store glucose. Type 2 diabetes develops when the body isn’t able to use insulin properly. Gestational diabetes is a condition that pregnant women develop when their body is not able to make and use insulin properly during pregnancy. Other questions related to Diabetes Diabetes, also known as diabetes mellitus, occurs when the body’s blood sugar levels are too high. If diabetes is interfering with your daily life, log on to Amwell and talk to a doctor to receive a treatment plan customized for you. Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes (10 Useful Facts)

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes (10 Useful Facts)

Type 1 a type diabetes defines the problem of high sugar level in the blood cells. In diabetes inability to control the blood sugar creates so many problems. But some people take both as the identical problem. However, there is the huge difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Accordingly to the survey conducted by the Center for disease control and prevention almost 9.3 percent of the total population is dealing with the diabetes problem. Type 1 diabetes has seen in almost 5 percent of the people, and more than 95 percent of the people have type 2 diabetes. 10 differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes 1. Cause of type 1 and type 2 diabetes Type 1 diabetes In the type 1 diabetes the immune system of the body attached to the cells in the pancreas that makes insulin. Type 1 is basically the malfunction of the body which led to the bad immune system problem. The immune system so the body used to kill that foreign cells those can create the problems. The immune system is a preventive mechanism to deal with the cells cause virus. As per the researchers, it does not clear yet why body cells attack body’s own cells. The cause of this development could be environmental and genetic effects. SEE ALSO: How To Cure Diabetes Naturally At Home Without Medication? Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes patient has the problem with the insulin résistance. The body produces enough level of insulin but not able to use it in an effective manner. This is always the biggest question why some people cannot be able to use the inulin, and some can use but do not have enough level of insulin. As per the researchers, lifestyle and weight can be the biggest factor in this. However genetic and environments factors also affect this. When people developed type 2 diabetes, their pancreas tries Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

If one looks at the current rates of reported cases of diabetes, citing it as a growing epidemic would not be an exaggeration. According to the latest estimations, there are about twenty-nine million people that have some type of diabetes which is nearly 10 percent of the population An even more worrying thing than that is the fact that an average American now has a one in three chances of developing the symptoms of the degenerative disease at some point in their life. All of the statistics on the problem of the rising of diabetes is a big worry in the United States and in the world currently. It even gets worse as one gets into more details. Statistically, around eighty-six million people have signs of pre-diabetes. 30 percent of these people develop type 2 diabetes within a time period of five years. Perhaps this is because of the last and most worrying concern – un-diagnosis. Around one-third of the adult population with the symptoms of pre-diabetes or even the fully developed disease is unaware of having the health condition. That makes approximately eight million undiagnosed. This is why it is important to look out for the symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It will not only help in better management of the disease but will reduce the chances of diabetes-related problems. Why Is It Important To Look Out For The Type? Another thing that a lot of people ignore is looking at what type of diabetes do they have. While many may not know it but there are a number of differences between the type 1 and the type 2 of diabetes where it is possible to reverse the latter. Technically, both of the types of diabetes cannot be cured but type 2 can be reversed in earlier stages. Checking the symptoms of the specific type of diabetes can help in the better treatment of a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Can You Tell Type 1 And Type 2 Apart?

Diabetes Symptoms: Can You Tell Type 1 And Type 2 Apart?

Diabetes is a life-long condition that causes a person’s blood sugar level to rise too high. New research by healthcare provider Abbott into the country’s views on diabetes has found 43 per of UK adults can’t tell the two types apart, despite the fact they have significant differences. Type 1 is when the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin by mistake, damaging the pancreas and causing it to be unable to produce insulin and move it out of the bloodstream into cells. It is often inherited - if you have a close relative with it there’s a six per cent chance you’ll suffer too - and it can cause serious long-term health problems, including blindness, kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Type 2 is the most common, with 90 per cent of diabetes suffers in the UK falling into that category. Type 2, on the other hand, is when the body doesn't produce enough insulin - or the body's cells don't react to insulin - meaning that glucose stays in the blood and isn’t used as fuel for energy. This type is commonly associated with obesity and old age, and triggers the same long-term health problems as type 1. According to the NHS, the second type is the most common, with 90 per cent of diabetes suffers in the UK falling into that category. Then there’s gestational diabetes - when women experience high levels of blood glucose during pregnancy - and pre-diabetes, the stage below full-blown diabetes when blood sugar is still above the normal range. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Symptoms are similar for any type of diabetes. These include being very thirsty, going Continue reading >>

Which Is More Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is More Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is a complicated condition and is mainly categorized into two different types: Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. There are a lot of differences as well as similarities between the two-condition due to which people often argue as to which type of diabetes is worse than the other. The following article deals with this question as we try to understand the differences and similarities between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. So, read on “Which is More Worse Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes?” Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Let us first start by understanding the differences between the two types of diabetes. Following are the major differences: Definition Type 1 is the type of diabetes that is caused when the beta cells of the pancreas responsible for the production of the hormone insulin are destroyed completely. Thus, the body lacks insulin. Type 2 is the condition where the pancreas of the body is able to produce the hormone. However, the body is unable to utilize the hormone appropriately for several reasons. Causes The main causes of type 1 are genetic disorders, exposure to varied types of viral infections such as mumps and other viruses, exposure to the toxins in the environment, amongst others. Insulin resistance is the most important cause of type 2 diabetes. The condition is also associated with the increase in the body weight of the individual as well as with high levels of blood pressure and bad cholesterol levels. Genes can also be a factor here too. Onset The onset in case of type 1 is often very rapid, while the onset of type 2 is often really slow. The type 1 is mostly diagnosed during the childhood while type 2 is said to be diagnosed in adults who are usually over 30 years of age. Symptoms In either type of diabetes, the symptoms are slow to appea Continue reading >>

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults (lada)

Latent Autoimmune Diabetes In Adults (lada)

Type 1 diabetes diagnosed in adulthood may be a form of slowly-progressing diabetes called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LADA is also known as slow-onset type 1 diabetes, type 1.5 diabetes, late-onset autoimmune diabetes of adulthood, and even “double diabetes,” since it has elements of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. LADA patients, however, are closer to type 1 patients, because they will test positive for antibodies against insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. LADA is more common than classic childhood type 1 diabetes, and is similar to type 1 diabetes, but presents more slowly—and therefore does not require insulin therapy as early in the course of treatment. Most LADA patients do eventually require insulin; the key difference between LADA and type 1 diabetes is not the age of disease onset, but rather the progression of the disease. People with type 1 diabetes tend to be completely insulin-dependent within a few months of diagnosis, while people with LADA can sometimes survive for years without needing to take insulin. Because they still produce some insulin, and because the disease usually occurs in people over the age of thirty without severe symptoms, many LADA patients are initially misdiagnosed with type 2 diabetes. In fact, researchers estimate that up to 10 percent of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have LADA. LADA can be distinguished from type 2 diabetes by antibody tests. Patients who are antibody-positive have an autoimmune reaction similar to that of type 1 diabetes, but which is not found in type 2 diabetes. Researchers still don’t know whether autoimmune diabetes in adults is due to the same underlying disease process as type 1 diabetes in children, and there are many LADA questions that still need answers. In an Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Find out the difference here. By Lester Wong Photo: udra / www.123rf.com PEOPLE AT RISK Type 1 diabetes most commonly presents in childhood and young adulthood. A family history puts a person at a slightly higher risk. Type 2 diabetes tends to occur in older people, above 40 years of age, especially those who are obese. TYPE 2 DIABETES MORE COMMON THAN TYPE 1 Over 90 per cent of the 400,000 diabetes cases here are Type 2, according to the 2010 national health survey. TYPE 2 DIABETES CAN BE PREVENTED, BUT NOT TYPE 1 Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Life-long insulin replacement is needed. Type 2 diabetes is associated with weight gain or obesity, leading to resistance to insulin. Long-term insulin replacement is needed only in more severe cases. “Maintaining a healthy weight through healthy eating and regular physical activity can help prevent Type 2 diabetes,” said Dr Daphne Gardner, a consultant at the Singapore General Hospital’s department of endocrinology. ONSET OF SYMPTOMS Both types of diabetes are marked by high glucose levels in the blood. Symptoms include thirst and frequent urination, weight loss, fatigue and recurrent infections. Symptoms for Type 2 diabetes may not show up until the glucose levels are very high. The onset of symptoms for Type 1 diabetes can be abrupt, sometimes happening over a matter of weeks. A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 15, 2016, with the headline ‘Differences between Type 1 and 2 diabetes‘. Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes In Children And Diabetes In Adults?

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes In Children And Diabetes In Adults?

There are two types of diabetes, and both children and adults can develop either type. Type 1 diabetes, also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), requires the patient to receive insulin injections each day to keep his or her blood sugar level under control. It may develop after a viral or bacterial infection, or there could be another event that triggers an autoimmune response that destroys beta cells in the pancreas. When this happens, not enough insulin is produced as beta cells are required. Type 1 diabetes often runs in families and is genetically passed down from one generation to another. According to the American Diabetes Association, type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes rates in children are increasing. Type 2 Diabetes in Children Type 2 diabetes was once unheard of in children and adolescents, but today children are being diagnosed with this disease that once rarely struck anyone under the age of 40. According to the U.S. Center for Disease Control, only American Indians have had a statistically significant increase in type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents. Researchers believe that increasing obesity rates and lack of physical exercise is causing type 2 diabetes rates to increase. Children with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin and need injections of it every day, but kids with type 2 diabetes often respond to changes in diet, loss of extra weight, and exercise. Cause of Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Adults Both children and adults appear to develop type 2 diabetes and an elevated blood sugar level when they are obese, according to the American Diabetes Association. Some other risk factors for adolescents are puberty, intrauterine exposure to diabetes, a sedentary lifestyle, and being female. Children w Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2

Diabetes: Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease in which the body does not develop enough pancreatic hormone insulin. It is necessary to deliver glucose to the cells of the body, which enters the bloodstream from food and provides tissues with energy. When there is a lack of insulin or body tissues cannot use it, the level of glucose in the blood rises - this condition is called hyperglycemia. It’s dangerous for almost all body systems. What is the difference between type1 and type 2 diabetes? There are two types of diabetes mellitus, which have significant differences despite a certain similarity. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the beta cells of the pancreas can not release the necessary amount of insulin. Sometimes beta cells are “defective” from birth, sometimes the process of destruction of beta-cells in the body is triggered by infectious disease, severe stress, exposure to drugs, etc. Insufficiency of beta cells occurs with some genetic syndromes. If this process is accompanied by the development of antibodies against the body’s own tissues (antibodies to insulin or the beta-cells themselves), it is called autoimmune. Type 1 diabetes 1 results in gradual destruction of beta cells and the depletion of insulin, which must be compensated for by the constant introduction of it into the body exogenously (from outside), otherwise the patient could die soon. With type 2 diabetes, beta cells function normally, but the body is not able to use it effectively. This is due to impaired perception of the insulin signal by certain organs and tissues: their receptors to insulin cease to work normally, as a result of which carbohydrate metabolism slows down and peripheral organs suffer. Sometimes, with such a mechanism, beta cells even begin to produce an increased amount of insulin, Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Tweet Whilst both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Confused over which type of diabetes you have? It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think. For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight. But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin. Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight. Because both types of diabetes can be so varied and unpredictable, it's often difficult to know which type of diabetes someone has. It's not safe to assume that an overweight person with high blood glucose levels has type 2 diabetes, because the cause of their condition might in fact be attributable to type 1. In some cases, when the type of diabetes is in doubt, your health team may need to carry out specialised tests to work out which type of diabetes you have. This way, they can recommend the most appropriate treatment for your diabetes. Common differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Despite the uncertainty that often surrounds a diagnosis of diabetes, there are a few common characteristics of each diabetes type. Please note that these differences are based on generalisations - exceptions are common. For instance, the perception of type 1 diabetes isn't strictly true: many cases are diagnosed in adulthood. This table should be seen as a rough guide to the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, rather than hard and fast rules. Co Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

The Differences & Similarities Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Differences & Similarities Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

“Oh, you have diabetes? That’s where you can’t eat sugar and have to poke yourself with needles and stuff because you ate too much candy as a kid…right?” *sigh* Wrong. Most people have no clue what diabetes is let alone that there is more than one type of diabetes. Type 1, type 2, LADA, MODY, and gestational are just some classification examples of diabetes. All have a range of differences and similarities but the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. As type 1 and type 2 diabetics [should] know, there are a few major differences between the two conditions which, all too often, get confused and misconstrued by the public. Yet, there are also a few similarities that get overlooked even among people in the diabetic community. Take a look at these two major forms of diabetes and make sure you can not only distinguish the differences but also share the similarities. Similarities Symptoms The symptoms for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are identical in most ways. Both conditions involve three distinct symptoms prior to diagnosis: Polyuria – excessive urination often due to high blood sugar Polydipsia – excessive thirst Polyphagia – excessive hunger In type 2 diabetes, symptoms tend to be more gradual than type 1 but they both still share these symptoms along with the other usual byproducts of diabetes like high and low blood sugar, increased agitation, shaky/sweaty blood sugar reactions, as well as the more severe hypoglycemic events that can lead to seizures, coma, and death. Complications People often ask “so, do you have the bad kind of diabetes” and it kind of makes my ears bleed. There is no “good kind” of diabetes and anyone who thinks there is either doesn’t understand diabetes or is living in a warped world of “th Continue reading >>

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