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What Type Of Diabetes Is Worse

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus (or diabetes) is a chronic, lifelong condition that affects your body's ability to use the energy found in food. There are three major types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. All types of diabetes mellitus have something in common. Normally, your body breaks down the sugars and carbohydrates you eat into a special sugar called glucose. Glucose fuels the cells in your body. But the cells need insulin, a hormone, in your bloodstream in order to take in the glucose and use it for energy. With diabetes mellitus, either your body doesn't make enough insulin, it can't use the insulin it does produce, or a combination of both. Since the cells can't take in the glucose, it builds up in your blood. High levels of blood glucose can damage the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys, heart, eyes, or nervous system. That's why diabetes -- especially if left untreated -- can eventually cause heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and nerve damage to nerves in the feet. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes, because it often begins in childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. It's caused by the body attacking its own pancreas with antibodies. In people with type 1 diabetes, the damaged pancreas doesn't make insulin. This type of diabetes may be caused by a genetic predisposition. It could also be the result of faulty beta cells in the pancreas that normally produce insulin. A number of medical risks are associated with type 1 diabetes. Many of them stem from damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes (called diabetic retinopathy), nerves (diabetic neuropathy), and kidneys (diabetic nephropathy). Even more serious is the increased risk of hea Continue reading >>

Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes | Prevention

Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes | Prevention

When people hear that you have diabetes , they start to make assumptions that aren't always accurate. A lot of the confusion stems from the fact that there are two main types, yet many people don't understand how they're different. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get daily healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) As someone with type 1 diabetesI was diagnosed with it nearly 40 years agoI'm all too familiar with the disease. I lived with it as a child, teen, and adult, and when I decided to have kids I had to figure out how to manage the condition while being pregnant. (I even wrote a book about it, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby .) Having type 1 diabetes means I'm in the minority: Of the approximately 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only 1.25 million have type 1. Most have type 2, which is a totally different form. "Comparing type 1 to type 2 is like comparing apples to tractors," says Gary Scheiner, a Pennsylvania-based certified diabetes educator and author of Think Like a Pancreas . "The only thing they really have in common is that both involve an inability to control blood sugar levels." Here are 5 important distinctions. MORE: 7 Reasons You're Tired All The Time 1. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease; type 2 isn't. Diabetes happens when your body has trouble with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. When there isnt enough insulin in your body, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can make you sick. People with type 1 and type 2 both face this problem, but how they arrived there is quite different. If you have type 1, you don't make any insulin at all. That's because type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system attacks and dest Continue reading >>

Is Type 1 Diabetes Worse Than Type 2 Diabetes?

Is Type 1 Diabetes Worse Than Type 2 Diabetes?

The way we think about type 1 and type 2 diabetes has changed dramatically over the past 20 to 30 years. Both types and their associated risk factors can be treated successfully today. Having type 1 diabetes is no longer considered to be a death sentence. There are so many approved treatment options, including fast- and long-acting insulin analogs, pumps, pens, and continuous glucose monitors. It is now possible to reduce swings in blood sugar levels and get the A1c to goal while reducing episodes of hypoglycemia. Type 2 diabetes is now considered an extremely serious condition associated with a very high rate of heart disease. In fact, it is estimated that four out of five people with type 2 diabetes will die from cardiovascular disease (heart attacks and strokes) -- and not the eye, kidney, and nerve disease that we commonly associate with diabetes complications. This content originally appeared in the Taking Control of Your Diabetes newsletter on tcoyd.org. Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the problem of high levels of blood sugar. The inability to control blood sugar causes the symptoms and the complications of both types of diabetes. But type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are two different diseases in many ways. According to the latest (2014) estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Type 1 diabetes affects just 5 percent of those adults, with type 2 diabetes affecting up to 95 percent. Here’s what else you need to know to be health-savvy in the age of the diabetes epidemic. What Causes Diabetes? "Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease — the body's immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin," a hormone, says Andjela Drincic, MD, associate professor of internal medicine in the division of diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The exact cause is not known, but it's probably a combination of the genes a person is born with and something in the environment that triggers the genes to become active. "The cause of type 2 diabetes is multifactorial," says Dr. Drincic. "People inherit genes that make them susceptible to type 2, but lifestyle factors, like obesity and inactivity, are also important. In type 2 diabetes, at least in the early stages, there is enough insulin, but the body becomes resistant to it." Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a family history of the disease, a poor diet, a sedentary lifestyle, and obesity. African-Americans, Latin Americans, and certain Native American groups have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans. Juvenile or Adult-Onset: When Does Diabetes Start? Usually, type 1 diabetes in dia Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

First, the formal name for what we commonly call diabetes is diabetes mellitus, which translates from the Greek as making lots of urine with sugar in it or making lots of sweet urine. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are diseases that have in common, sugar in the urine and the increased urination. When there are high amounts of sugar in the blood, the kidneys filter sugar into the urine. Sugar can be measured in the urine through a lab test commonly called a urinalysis. Urine dipsticks are also used to show sugar in the urine. Patients who develop diabetes mellitus most commonly have initial symptoms of increased thirst, increased urination and blurred vision due to high amounts of sugar in the fluids of the eye. Type 1 diabetes results from a rheumatoid-like autoimmune reaction in which one's own body attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that normally produce insulin. Type 1 is a disease in which the patient in a relatively short time has no insulin production. All patients with type 1 diabetes can also develop a serious metabolic disorder called ketoacidosis when their blood sugars are high and there is not enough insulin in their body. Ketoacidosis can be fatal unless treated as an emergency with hydration and insulin. Type 1 was once commonly called juvenile diabetes mellitus because it is most commonly diagnosed in children. It should be noted that even older adults in their 60s have occasionally been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus. One should think of it as a disease of high blood sugars due to a deficiency of insulin production. It must be treated by administration of insulin. Insulin is given at least twice a day and is often given four times a day in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes rates are growing dramatically Continue reading >>

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes: Which One Is Worse?

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes: Which One Is Worse?

What are the differences between the causes of type 1 and type 2? The underlying causes of type 1 and type 2 are different. Type 1 diabetes causes Type 1 diabetes is believed to be due to an autoimmune process, in which the body's immune system mistakenly targets its own tissues (islet cells in the pancreas). In people with type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas that are responsible for insulin production are attacked by the misdirected immune system. This tendency for the immune system to destroy the beta cells of the pancreas is likely to be, at least in part, genetically inherited, although the exact reasons that this process happens are not fully understood. Exposure to certain viral infections (mumps and Coxsackie viruses) or other environmental toxins have been suggested as possible reasons why the abnormal antibody responses develop that cause damage to the pancreas cells. The primary problem in type 2 diabetes is the inability of the body's cells to use insulin properly and efficiently, leading to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and diabetes. This problem affects mostly the cells of muscle and fat tissues, and results in a condition known as insulin resistance. In type 2 diabetes, there also is a steady decline of beta cells that worsens the process of elevated blood sugars. At the beginning, if someone is resistant to insulin, the body can at least partially increase production of insulin enough to overcome the level of resistance. Over time, if production decreases and enough insulin cannot be released, blood sugar levels rise. In many cases this actually means the pancreas produces larger than normal quantities of insulin, but the body is not able to use it effectively. A major feature of type 2 diabetes is a lack of sensitivity to insulin by the ce Continue reading >>

Which Is More Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is More Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is a complicated condition and is mainly categorized into two different types: Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. There are a lot of differences as well as similarities between the two-condition due to which people often argue as to which type of diabetes is worse than the other. The following article deals with this question as we try to understand the differences and similarities between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. So, read on “Which is More Worse Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes?” Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Let us first start by understanding the differences between the two types of diabetes. Following are the major differences: Definition Type 1 is the type of diabetes that is caused when the beta cells of the pancreas responsible for the production of the hormone insulin are destroyed completely. Thus, the body lacks insulin. Type 2 is the condition where the pancreas of the body is able to produce the hormone. However, the body is unable to utilize the hormone appropriately for several reasons. Causes The main causes of type 1 are genetic disorders, exposure to varied types of viral infections such as mumps and other viruses, exposure to the toxins in the environment, amongst others. Insulin resistance is the most important cause of type 2 diabetes. The condition is also associated with the increase in the body weight of the individual as well as with high levels of blood pressure and bad cholesterol levels. Genes can also be a factor here too. Onset The onset in case of type 1 is often very rapid, while the onset of type 2 is often really slow. The type 1 is mostly diagnosed during the childhood while type 2 is said to be diagnosed in adults who are usually over 30 years of age. Symptoms In either type of diabetes, the symptoms are slow to appea Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Tweet Whilst both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Confused over which type of diabetes you have? It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think. For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight. But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin. Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight. Because both types of diabetes can be so varied and unpredictable, it's often difficult to know which type of diabetes someone has. It's not safe to assume that an overweight person with high blood glucose levels has type 2 diabetes, because the cause of their condition might in fact be attributable to type 1. In some cases, when the type of diabetes is in doubt, your health team may need to carry out specialised tests to work out which type of diabetes you have. This way, they can recommend the most appropriate treatment for your diabetes. Common differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Despite the uncertainty that often surrounds a diagnosis of diabetes, there are a few common characteristics of each diabetes type. Please note that these differences are based on generalisations - exceptions are common. For instance, the perception of type 1 diabetes isn't strictly true: many cases are diagnosed in adulthood. This table should be seen as a rough guide to the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, rather than hard and fast rules. Co Continue reading >>

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Late Update: To be completely clear, the goal of this post is to point out how unproductive this question is. It comes up from time to time in the forums, but only leads to division. We all, regardless of type, have plenty to share with each other. Now, on to the original article. On our Facebook page, we discussed the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In the process, some type 1s and type 2s both suggested that they had it worse. Before we look at this question, let’s review the difference between the two types. The Difference Between Type 1 & Type 2 Imagine insulin is the key that opens your cells and lets sugar enter. If sugar can’t enter, it builds up in the blood, makes you hungry and thirsty, and causes your body to turn to fat for energy. The symptoms of diabetes. In type 1, your pancreas stops making keys. You need to put keys in your body (i.e. inject insulin) or sugar can’t get into your cells. In type 2 diabetes, the keyhole is rusty. You have keys, but they have trouble opening the cells. You either need more keys or a way to make the lock work better. You can take a little rust off the lock by exercising, losing weight, or taking medication. This is an imperfect analogy, but hopefully it highlights the basic difference. So Which Type Is Worse? This is a maddening question. Every person is unique, and neither type is a cake walk! Type 1s need insulin to live – but type 2s can require enormous amounts of insulin as their resistance to it increases and their insulin production declines. Type 2s can walk around undiagnosed for 5 years and have complications when diagnosed. People with type 1 usually get diagnosed quickly and can take immediate action. But don’t type 1s live with diabetes for a longer period of time? Not always! Some type Continue reading >>

Why Prescribing Insulin Makes Type 2 Diabetes Even Worse (and How To Naturally Reverse It)

Why Prescribing Insulin Makes Type 2 Diabetes Even Worse (and How To Naturally Reverse It)

The United States has seen a rapid rise in pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes over the last decade. Nearly 80 million people—about one in four—now has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes among children and teens is also growing at a rapid rate. The most recent data1,2 reveals that, between 2001 and 2009, type 2 diabetes among children aged 10-19 rose by 30 percent. Overwhelmingly, the evidence points to a faulty diet—indeed the entire culture of inappropriate, health-harming food—which is the topic of the fast-paced documentary, Carb-Loaded: A Culture Dying to Eat,3 produced by Lathe Poland and Eric Carlsen. Poland was himself diagnosed with diabetes in 2010, which led to the creation of this revealing film. In a press release, Poland notes: “I wasn’t overweight… To be honest, I was completely blown away when my doctor gave me the diagnosis. Why would a seemingly healthy 30 something man like myself get a disease like this? My misconception like most people was that there were two scenarios where you get diabetes…Either it’s hereditary and it’s not your fault, or you eat junk food like it’s going out of style and end up diabetic.” His doctor wanted him to take three different medications, and what alarmed Poland was what he calls “the rubber stamp approach.” So he decided to look deeper, to find out what really causes diabetes, and whether the drug approach was really the only remedy. Processed Carbs Fuel the Diabetes Epidemic For the last 50 years, Americans have been told to eat a high complex carbohydrate, low saturated fat diet. Even diabetics have been told to eat 50-60 percent of their daily calories in the form of processed carbs. As the filmmakers note, “refined and processed foods, especially processed carbohydrates have become a stap Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Introduction Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin This topic is about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: feeling very thirsty passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk Read more about the symptoms of type 2 diabetes It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Read about the causes and risk factors for type 2 diabetes Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may eventually need medication – usually tablets – to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Read mor Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

How Serious Is Type 2 Diabetes? Is It More Serious Than Type 1 Diabetes?

A fellow caregiver asked... How serious is type 2 diabetes, and is it less or more serious than type 1 diabetes? My mom, just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, keeps it under control without taking insulin. So is type 2 diabetes less of a problem than insulin-dependent type 1? Expert Answers No, definitely not. In fact, in some ways type 2 diabetes is a more serious disorder because your mom may have had it for years before she was diagnosed. So she may well have developed some of the long-term, debilitating complications linked to the condition without knowing it. In addition, since type 2 diabetes is a progressive disorder without a cure, over time her body may not be able to produce insulin or use it as well as it does now, and she may wind up needing insulin injections or pills. A person with type1 diabetes ignores it for a day at his own peril. He'll likely end up in the emergency room because his body can't absorb glucose without a continuous supply of insulin via injection or an insulin pump. People with type 1 diabetes typically develop such severe symptoms over a short time in childhood or early adulthood that they're forced to deal with it. Type 2 diabetes is a sneakier condition: Its harmful health effects can slowly build for years until full-blown complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, or foot problems, make it impossible to ignore. Plus it often comes with its own set of problems. For instance, people with type 2 diabetes are frequently diagnosed with high blood pressure and cholesterol along with high blood sugar. This damaging threesome can lead to progressive thickening of the arteries and reduced blood flow, putting your mom at greater risk for a slew of complications including heart disease, stroke, and nerve damage. If your mom is overweigh Continue reading >>

Type 1s Vs. Type 2s?

Type 1s Vs. Type 2s?

If you’ve read my books or blog entries, you know that I advocate people coming together to fight for health. But it seems some people with diabetes may fight each other instead of allying. A recent article on Diabetes Health, called “What People with Type 1 Diabetes Can Learn from Type 2s,” provoked dozens of mostly angry comments. “Type 1 is nothing like Type 2,” was the type of comment posted by many people with Type 1. One wrote, ” [Unlike people with Type 2], I cannot take a day off. If I eat everything my dietitian suggests, I must still check my blood glucose four to seven times per day and take numerous injections or bolus my pump. How many Type 2s have been unconscious in the middle of the night due to low blood sugar?” The source of the anger seems to be society’s prejudice against people with Type 2, the belief that the disease is their fault, that they could cure it with diet and exercise. Some of this nonsense is sloshing from Types 2s onto Type 1s because the public doesn’t know the difference between the two conditions. “Thanks to Type 2s, people who have Type 1 are a getting a ‘bad rap’,” one poster wrote. Some Type 1 victims of this prejudice resent it. “I wish these two different diseases didn’t go by the same name,” was a typical type of comment. The sad thing is that many people with Type 1 seem to have bought into the false idea that people with Type 2 are “doing it to themselves.” Their anger is understandable. Living with Type 1 is hard enough, and now everyone thinks you brought it on yourself, and most of the research money and publicity starts going into Type 2. There is also the perception that Type 2s don’t understand how hard it is to live with Type 1, with the dangers of hypos and all the matching of ca Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

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