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What To Eat After Wisdom Teeth Removal For Diabetics

Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes And Oral Health

During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1 What Is Diabetes?Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3 If you have been diagnosed with diabetes,you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease. Are There Different Types of Diabetes?It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3 What Is Periodontal Disease?Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial plaque, a sticky, colorless microbial film that con Continue reading >>

Wisdom Teeth Removed - Any Advice?

Wisdom Teeth Removed - Any Advice?

My daughter who is 16 is having her wisdom teeth removed under general anesthesia. The doctor has advised to go easy on her tresiba to ensure shes not low during the surgery. Any other words of wisdom or things I should be aware of? Great question! My oldest (nonD) son got his removed yesterday. It was quick and uneventful - less than a half an hour. I thought about what I would do if Caleb needs to have his removed. I would definitely target a higher bg starting overnight bc of fasting instructions and keep a higher target until I am confident hes able to eat regularly. Id approach it similar to a stomach bug. Colin came home and had a milkshake, then pasta, then scrambled eggs and rice with a gelato chaser. All has gone well so far, knock wood. Good luck. Ill be watching for advice from those who have been under general anesthesia! And a reminder to check the expiration date on the glucagon the stuff is only good for a short period of time, and often times I have to set a reminder to go pick up another one otherwise Id forget since its not something that we generally use unless its an emergency situation. My 19 yr old had all 4 wisdom teeth removed last November. We lowered her basals at 5am. She went under at 8:15, with BG at 130. I gave the Dexcom to the surgeon (he was also administering anesthesia) & explained how to work it. Half an hour later they called me back to take her hom. BG was between 120 & 130 throughout. She did only liquids for 2 days (her choice). Lots of smoothies, soup & water. She did fine. A few lows into the 60s but nothing a little juice couldnt handle. When under General anesthesia the anesthesiologist should be checking the numbers with a Glucose meter! I would make sure they do that! Meters can be off by +/- 20. If her Dexcom hadnt been ac Continue reading >>

Insights On Controlling Blood Sugar In The Dentist’s Chair

Insights On Controlling Blood Sugar In The Dentist’s Chair

According to the American Dental Association (ADA), people with diabetes are more prone to periodontitis, tooth decay, oral fungal infections, taste diminishment, gingivitis and delayed healing time than people without the disease. That’s because uncontrolled blood sugar levels can cause and worsen those symptoms and conditions. According to the ADA, sugary and starchy foods contribute to high glucose levels in saliva, which can wear down tooth enamel, causing decay and cavities. Periodontal disease, which affects the gums and bones that hold the teeth in place, occurs at higher rates among diabetics. Of course, those diseases often lead people with diabetes to the dentist chair, and it’s there that they must undertake a juggling act between blood sugar control and the after-effects of dentistry. For people with diabetes, maintaining control of blood sugar levels after oral surgery can be frustrating. What we eat and the amounts we eat can become dangerously limited. As a diabetic who has undergone four wisdom tooth extractions and six fillings within the past two years, I am constantly looking for better ways to maintain control over my blood sugar. Plan for the Unexpected It is very important to plan for delays or extra procedures. Last summer, to beat the midday rush, I scheduled a dental appointment for 8:30 a.m. I didn’t eat breakfast because I had experienced a bad reaction when I ate before a biopsy requiring a local anesthetic two weeks earlier. I reasoned that I would be out of the office by 10 a.m. and would be able to eat soon thereafter. When I arrived, I learned that my dentist was ill and that because the procedure could not wait, a substitute dentist would do the necessary work. I told him that I was a diabetic and requested that I have a few minute Continue reading >>

Wisdom Teeth Removal Tomorrow; Food Ideas?

Wisdom Teeth Removal Tomorrow; Food Ideas?

Wisdom Teeth Removal Tomorrow; Food Ideas? Wisdom Teeth Removal Tomorrow; Food Ideas? I'm 20 years old, and I've been a T1 diabetic for slightly less than a year. Tomorrow I'm getting all four wisdom teeth extracted, under full IV sedation (blood + pain + me = no). Once I get back home (my roommate is driving me to and from), I'm sure that I'll be on copious amounts of medication for the pain (all 4 teeth are impacted). Additionally, I have the understanding that I won't be physically able to eat anything that's not the consistency of pudding. 1) Aside from lowering my dose pre-surgery to lower the chance of my going hypoglycemic, what modification will I need to make to my normal insulin regimen (I'm on Levemir and Novolog multiple daily injetions). 2) What foods are there that I'll be able to eat that are low in sugar? All of the recommended foods that I can find (applesauce, baby food, ice cream, milk shakes) are relatively high in sugars. The only things that I can think of are sugar-free puddings and jello, oatmeal, and perhaps mashed potatoes. I had soup when I had my wisdom teeth out. You can vary your insulin doses and not just your food to make sure you aren't too high or too low. I was on a low dose of steroids for a few days after my surgery which had my BGs high. Mostly I just slept so food wasn't an issue! Insulin (avg): 19.8 U (35% bolus); CHO (avg): 87g; BG (avg): 97 mg/dl; SD: 31 Tests (avg): 5.1; High: 168; Low: 51; highs>140: 3; lows<70: 10 Continue reading >>

List Of Soft Diabetic Foods To Eat After Oral Surgery

List Of Soft Diabetic Foods To Eat After Oral Surgery

Oral surgery can necessitate limited foods for a patient in the days and weeks following the procedure. This is typically done to avoid traumatizing the mouth or damaging any repairs. A physician typically orders a soft diet for a specific time period following surgery. For the diabetic patient, a soft-food diet should not be too difficult to follow, as there are many soft diabetic foods to eat after oral surgery. Video of the Day Diabetic patients must watch their intake of carbohydrates, which can raise blood glucose levels. If a patient carefully monitors how many carbohydrates she eats, she can still keep her blood sugar within a normal range. Carbohydrates supply energy to the body, so they are an important aspect of the diet. Soft carbohydrate foods for the diabetic patient include soft cereals such as oatmeal and farina; starchy vegetables such as cooked squash or mashed potatoes; and cooked beans. The American Diabetic Association recommends avoiding high sugar foods to provide carbohydrates, such as full sugar pudding and ice cream. An ideal diabetic diet should have carbohydrates composing about 50 percent of calories. Fruits, which contain fiber, vitamins and nutrients, can be high in sugar and should be counted among carbohydrate levels. There are still many fruit choices available for a soft diabetic diet. Applesauce and bananas are options for soft foods following oral surgery. Fruits may also be blended with juice or ice to make a smoothie, but avoid choosing fruits such as raspberries that contain seeds. Vegetables are important components of a diabetic diet, providing nutrients and vitamins essential for health. Many vegetables may be cooked to incorporate into a soft diabetic diet following oral surgery. Vegetables such as beets, carrots, eggplant and Continue reading >>

Oral Surgery - Type 1 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Oral Surgery - Type 1 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I'm getting ready to get my wisdom teeth out and my Dr said it will have to be an oral surgery. They're concerned about my sugars since I can't have anything to eat for bfast the day of. I'm a little worried about the anesthesia, I'm not sure if I need general or local or does it matter? I'm also worried about the healing process and what I can eat right after surgery. The surgery won't be until January but these are a few things that have been lingering in my head since my consultation. Does anyone have any advice, comments, pointers? How did you do after having your wisdom teeth taken out? This may sound like a stupid question but I've never had surgery so it's kind of scary. Just wondering, what should I expect? How are your basal rates? Have you ever basal tested? Do you KNOW what fasting will do to you? If yes to all, stay a little high but keep the pump on and don't worry about it. Surgery is fun ... I was awake for mine, but that was 25 years ago. You get amazing drugs. You won't mind it a bit. You are on a pump so consider it as a test of your basal insulin... if you have your basal(s) set correctly you should be able to fast without any problem. If not you might want to get them right before the surgery With that said, any oral surgery I have had, they preferred my BG to be a little higher than normal, as opposed to low. If your BG is generally well controlled, healing should be less of a concern. I'm getting ready to get my wisdom teeth out and my Dr said it will have to be an oral surgery. They're concerned about my sugars since I can't have anything to eat for bfast the day of. I' Continue reading >>

Patient Instructions

Patient Instructions

Instructions for patients undergoing local anesthesia, nitrous oxide (laughing gas) sedation, oral (children and adult) anesthesia: You may have a light meal (oatmeal, cereal, toast with a small glass of juice) 2-4 hours before your scheduled appointment. For patients undergoing oral sedation, a friend or family member should accompany the patient to their appointment, stay in the doctors office during the procedure, escort the patient home and observe the patient for 24 hours. Instructions for intravenous (IV) sedation: Patients undergoing Intravenous (IV) Sedation should have nothing to eat or drink for 6-8 hours prior to their appointment. If your appointment is in the morning, please refrain from all meals and beverages after midnight. If your appointment is in the afternoon, please eat a light breakfast (cereal, oatmeal, toast with a glass of juice/coffee) 6 hours prior to your scheduled appointment. Patients should wear loose, comfortable clothing (workout pants/sweats pants/shorts, a short sleeved t-shirt and shoes without a heel) to your appointment and should get plenty of sleep the night before. Minors should always have a parent or legal guardian accompany them to their appointment. A friend or family member should accompany the patient to their appointment, stay in the doctors office during the procedure, escort the patient home and observe the patient for 24 hours. Daily/Routine Medications: Patients taking daily medications may take their medications at their normal times with a few small sips of water. Diabetic Patients undergoing Intravenous (IV) Sedation: Patients with Diabetes should attempt to schedule their appointments in the morning when possible. For Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetics undergoing Sedation: All oral agents (Metformin, Glipizide, Glybu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Complications

Diabetes And Dental Complications

It has long been known that having diabetes increases the risk of severe periodontal disease. For example, people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop periodontal disease than those with well-controlled diabetes. Studies have found that poorly controlled diabetes respond differently to bacterial plaque at the gum line than do people with well-controlled diabetes and people without the disease. Also, people with poorly controlled diabetes have more harmful proteins (cytokines) in their gingival tissue, causing destructive inflammation of the gums. In turn, beneficial proteins (growth factors) are reduced, interfering with the healing response to infection. Lastly, people with diabetes tend to lose collagen, a protein that supports gums, skin, tendon cartilage, and bone, in their gum tissue, thus hastening periodontal destruction. Vascular disorders (caused by diabetes), such as reduced circulation in tiny blood vessels in the gums, interfere with nutrition and healing in the gum tissues. Young people with type 1 diabetes, especially those with poor control, are very vulnerable to early-onset periodontal disease as they reach puberty. Studies on Diabetes and Dental Problems A study published in the September 2002 issue of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice looked at 102 patients, average age 65 with type 2 diabetes. In this Swedish study, the researchers conducted a comprehensive dental examination and then compared these results with the same battery of tests given to a control group without diabetes but otherwise the same in terms of age and gender. The results indicate that subjects with diabetes had more pockets between teeth, which indicate moderate to advanced gum disease. They also had deeper pockets. The group with diabetes had mo Continue reading >>

15 Soft Foods To Eat After Wisdom Teeth Removal

15 Soft Foods To Eat After Wisdom Teeth Removal

Blended soups like tomato or pumpkin soup are great to eat after youve had your wisdom teeth removed. They are easy to consume and do not contain bits that could irritate the area of surgery. In addition, soups are generally rich in vitamins and minerals. This helps ensure you meet the daily nutrition recommendations when you cannot eat many whole fruits or vegetables. Blended soups can also keep you hydrated , which is very important after surgery. Its wise to ensure your soups are either lukewarm or cold, as hot soups can cause irritation. Also, make sure to blend vegetable-based soups as smooth as possible to avoid chunks. Summary Soups are great after surgery because they are easy to eat, usually rich in nutrients and can keep you hydrated. Just make sure they are blended thoroughly and consumed lukewarm or cold. Like soups, broths are an excellent source of nourishment after dental surgery. Not only are they delicious, they also contain a variety of vitamins and minerals. Moreover, broths are a great way to stay hydrated if you struggle to drink enough water. Bone broth is a type of broth touted for its health benefits. Its a nutritious stock that is made by simmering animal bones and connective tissue. Although there are no direct studies on the health effects of bone broth, studies on the components of bone broth suggest it may have anti-inflammatory benefits ( 2 , 3 ). Make sure to consume the broth either lukewarm or cold to avoid irritating the wound. Summary Like soups, broths are nutritious and easy to consume. Again, make sure to consume them lukewarm or cold so they dont irritate the wound. Greek yogurt is a healthy high-protein food you can enjoy after dental surgery. It has a smooth and creamy texture that is quite soothing and may help numb the mouth. Continue reading >>

Wisdom Teeth Removal

Wisdom Teeth Removal

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Keanna is getting her wisdom teeth out in the morning and I am getting more and more worried. What should I expect with her #'s etc? And recommendations for food etc no advice, but I hope everything goes smoothly for her! I had mine out a few years ago. My bg's were okay, but I slept for a week, only waking up to check, eat, bathroom, and more meds. The knock out stuff they use always makes me super out of it for a long time, and then they gave me super pain killers and that made me sleepy. You may need to do a basal change because of an activity level change, and any meds they give her may make bg's a little wonky. The important thing is to keep checking. As far as food goes, stick to the liquid/semi solid food group--smoothies, milkshakes, mashed potatoes, apple sauce, soup, etc. Cold things help keep things numb, but everyone needs other foods other than smoothies and milkshakes. You can always do the warm-ish food first and then a bit of dessert to start numbing things back up. If the knock out stuff makes her feel really sick, try some liquid Benadryl. This trick was given to me by my doctor when I had problems with my 12 year molars (they decided they didn't want to come in!) and it really helps lessen the sick feeling. Before hand, they ask you to fast for 8 hours minimum (your doc should have the real number and instructions) and they may want to have a say in the D care. Even though this person is a doctor, they don't know D as well as you do, let alone how your D works. My doctor wanted me to disconnect my pump at midnight and not take any insulin for 12 hours. Yeah...that didn't happen. Do what you need to do to maintain D. They can worry about the tee Continue reading >>

Post-extraction Wound Healing In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes (pewhpd)

Post-extraction Wound Healing In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes (pewhpd)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate clinical healing after dental extraction and the occurrence of surgical complications in patients with type 2 diabetes and compare with non-diabetic patients or control, taking into account laboratory data such as blood count, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1) and immunological profile of the patients. It has been established in scientific literature that patients with diabetes have a greater predisposition to oral complications and that oral infections may compromise their metabolic control. There is scant clinical evidence of a relationship between diabetes and an increased risk of infection after dental extractions. To our knowledge, no prospective longitudinal studies have been designed to prove this hypothesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate clinical healing after dental extraction and the occurrence of surgical complications in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes and compare with non-diabetic patients, taking into account laboratory data such as blood count, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1) and immunological profile of the patients. Ninety patients shall be prospectively studied, divided into 3 groups: Group 1 will consist of 30 patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetics patients, group 2 will consist of 30 controlled type 2 diabetics patients and group 3 composed of 30 non-diabetic patients (control group). All patients will undergo extraction of erupted teeth, always carried out by the same dentist (MS). A complete medical history and laboratory tests will be conducted for all patients including: glycated hemoglobin (HbA1), fasting glucose, complete blood count, platelets, prothrombin time (PT), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG and IgM), CD3, CD4, CD8, testing of complement (C3, C4), dihydrorhodamine Continue reading >>

Wisdom Tooth Removal?

Wisdom Tooth Removal?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi there everyone, I have some concerns about my teeth.. specifically my lower set of wisdom teeth. They're completely horizontal and I believe I will have to get them removed. However I'm unsure how the procedure will go as I have not had any major dental operations. Will I have anyone monitoring my blood sugar while they are working on my teeth? What if I start having a hypo? Will I need to have it done at a hospital or? Any help/advice is greatly appreciated. Many thanks! Hi, it depends on the dentist, find out from them if it will be hospital or just dentist job by, usually hospital will be for problem ones. Mine were taken out at the surgery. As for hypos, no, they don't check in the dentist. I had a tooth out yesterday and to avoid hypo, I just ate a little more and dropped my insulin a couple of units, I figured a short term 'high' a safer option. My main concern was what I could eat afterwards to be honest but luckily this one didn't hurt afterwards at all. If they are done at the hospital, which it seems likely, then yes, they will monitor your blood there. Hope tis helps! I jad the infortunate experience of having my wisdom teeth removed by a private hospisl in Surrey, 20+ years ago. They put me on 3 different bags of intravenous drip. Dhoulfld have been 1!! Started to lower and go hypo before gave premeds, but they still gave me premed....and decided just before op to increase the glucose and stop the insulin drip. Wanted to give me icecream after the op... Was due to stay in overnight but self discharged myself that afternoon as didn't like their care. However, my hubby had 4 wisdom teeth impacted like you removed at a dentist. He was very Continue reading >>

Think Twice Before You Get Those Wisdom Teethremoved

Think Twice Before You Get Those Wisdom Teethremoved

Think Twice Before You Get Those Wisdom TeethRemoved Posted on October 26, 2013 | Comments Off on Think Twice Before You Get Those Wisdom TeethRemoved Yahoo News covered the story earlier this year. Dentist Jay Friedman says far too many third molars are extracted prophylactically. He got his ideas published in American Journal of Public Health way back in 2007. A snippet: The British National Institute for Clinical Excellence is unequivocal in its recommendation, adopted by the National Health Service: The practice of prophylactic removal of pathology-free impacted third molars should be discontinued. . . . There is no reliable evidence to support a health benefit to patients from the prophylactic removal of pathology-free impacted teeth. 9 (p12)The conditions for which extraction is justified include nonrestorable dental caries, pulpal infection, cellulitis, recurrent pericoronitis, abscesses, cysts, and fractures. Dr. Friedman says the risks of extraction outweigh the benefits in most cases. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Teeth: Faq On Wisdom Teeth, Dentures And More - Healthxchange

Diabetes And Teeth: Faq On Wisdom Teeth, Dentures And More - Healthxchange

Diabetes and Teeth: FAQ on Wisdom Teeth, Dentures and More Diabetes and Teeth: FAQ on Wisdom Teeth, Dentures and More Having good oral health is important to those who suffer from diabetes. The Department of Restorative Dentistry at National Dental Centre Singapore answers some oral health questions. do not require special precautions for routine extractions. Dr Chee Hoe Kit , Consultant, Periodontics Unit , Department of Restorative Dentistry, National Dental Centre Singapore (NDCS) , a member of the SingHealth group, answers some frequently asked questions about diabetes and oral health: Q. Should I have my wisdom tooth removed, and what if the bleeding (after the tooth extraction) doesnt stop? A. It is not necessary to have your wisdom tooth removed if it is not impacted or buried and doesnt trap food that can potentially affect adjacent teeth. If there is uncontrolled bleeding after a tooth extraction, bite firmly onto a clean gauze or handkerchief thats placed over the wound, for at least 15-30 minutes. Avoid vigorous exercise, alcohol, very hot food or drink, for the rest of the day to minimise the risk of excessive post-operative bleeding. Do not rinse the wound area unnecessarily, or suck ice cubes, after the tooth extraction as this will disturb the blood clot that has formed inside the wound and stimulate bleeding again. If profuse bleeding persists despite the gauze-bite, return to the dental clinic or go to Accident & Emergency department at the nearest hospital. Q. Do people with diabetes take longer to recover after a wisdom tooth extraction and other dental surgical procedures, than non-diabetics? A. According to a large Australian study carried out in 2013, there is similar healing time between people with type 2 diabetes who are on oral hypoglycaemic m Continue reading >>

What Is The Recommended Blood Glucose Level For Tooth Removal?

What Is The Recommended Blood Glucose Level For Tooth Removal?

In hospital dental practice (while dealing with high risk patients), the main rule that is followed is, in cases of an uncontrolled medical condition, all elective procedures should be avoided. On the other note, in the same patient, any emergent condition that can be life-changing or life threatening must be performed as soon as possible while simultaneously treating the uncontrolled condition. As an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, we have had to do extractions in patients with their blood glucose levels > 300 mg/100ml! This became necessary because the tooth was the cause of serious fascial space infection in that patient. The patient was being intensively treated for controlling his diabetes and removal of the foci of infection can also help in his glycemic control as infective states can worsen glycemic control. The main issue of blood sugar is not during the extraction procedure, but what may happen after the procedure during the healing period as in delayed wound healing, dry socket or even osteomyelitis. Co existing conditions in a diabetic (like hypertension) may affect the outcome. The mere increased blood glucose levels are not a risk factor during the procedure. They tolerate the procedure well but in the post extraction period, some complications may be anticipated. Meticulous management of these complications can help avoid issues. Also, in most uncontrolled diabetics, the problem tooth requiring extraction is usually periodontally compromised and mobile. A uncontrolled diabetic who is on oral hypoglycemic agents will require about 2 weeks before he is reassessed when his glycemic status will be deemed to be in control. In this two weeks, the patient may need to be on prolonged medications (antibiotics, analgesics etc;) and that can have additional complica Continue reading >>

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