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What To Do If Sugar Level Is 220

Fasting Sugar 220 - Topics - Medschat

Fasting Sugar 220 - Topics - Medschat

I am 53 and my fasting is 220 since 3 days I take janumet morning and evening plus hi glitazone 30 m.. So what I shall do. ## iam 44 and my fasting is 220 i take trivilob 2 medicine 2 times in a day and afternoon i take exermat 500 so what i do to reduced my suger level ## Do you both also watch what you eat to keep your diets as low in fats and sugar as possible? The NIH does report that both of them vital to help lowering your blood sugar. Regular exercise can also help. Do either of you take any other medications? ... My mother 55year old, when checking sugar level in fasting it is about 220, and after fasting sugar level come down to 180. (checked 4-5 times to confirm the reading) Kindly guide in an correct way. ... Details of test are fasting sugar 145 after breakfast 175 before lunch 148 after lunch 167 before dinner 177 after dinner 220 at 3am 214.Doctor prescribed semi amaryl before food,ziten 20/500 ,carbophage 2and tazloc 20 1.Whether this will OK or cause side effect. Please clarify ## All medications carry the risk of causing side effects, that is just the nature of how it works, when you add a chemical to the body to try to rectify a problem. However, if you do not take the prescribed medications, high blood sugar can be deadly, so there is far less risk to dealing with the possible side effects. The U.S. FDA lists them as possibly including nausea, dizziness, headache, stomach pain, flatulence, and hypoglycemia. Is there anything else I can help with? ... I have just come to know that my sugar levels are Fasting 187 & PP 324. After knowing I started light sugar free food and some light exercise. After four days my test shows that Fasting is 140 and PP 220. Still I am doing the same exercise and taking light sugar free food. I have not started and drug. Pl Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Control diabetes with blood sugar level chart for a healthy diet.A Blood Sugar Level Chart is a reference for health care practitioners to use with their diabetic patients. This type of chart can also be of use when screening patents to determine if they may be at risk of developing this health condition. A quick and easy chart can also come in handy for individuals to use when they are trying to learn more about how blood glucose levels can impact their health. Normal Blood Sugar levels stay in a fairly tight range of numbers. Someone without diabetes may expect their glucose level to be in the 80-100 range if it has been 6 hours or more since they last consumed food or beverages. Individuals without diabetes will experience a rise in their glucose level after they are given food to eat. Immediately after consuming a meal or snack their glucose may read in the range of 170-200. If the glucose level is checked 2-3 hours after a meal then the increase in glucose will only be noted as 120-140. A diabetic patient can have widely different number readings when their glucose is checked. A fasting glucose level for these individuals could be very low or it may read as 126 or higher. Immediately after a meal the amount of glucose in their bloodstream might read in the 220-300+ range. Even when glucose readings are checked a few hours after meals diabetic patients will often register glucose levels that are in excess of 200. Those patients with diabetes who are under the care of a doctor, and choosing healthy foods to eat may be expected to register blood glucose readings that are more stable. Many diabetics will discover that their blood glucose is usually within the normal range if they are being properly treated for this chronic disease. If the doctor has alerted you to the Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Pregnancy is a wondrous and exciting time. It’s a time of change, both physically and emotionally. With the proper attention and prenatal medical care, most women with diabetes can enjoy their pregnancies and welcome a healthy baby into their lives. Why Tight Blood Sugar Control Is Critically Important Blood sugar control is important from the first week of pregnancy all the way until delivery. Organogenesis takes place in the first trimester. Uncontrolled blood sugar during the early weeks of pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage, and birth defects. (Women don’t develop gestational diabetes until later in pregnancy, which means they don’t share these early pregnancy risks.) Later in the pregnancy, uncontrolled blood sugar levels can cause fetal macrosomia, which may lead to shoulder dystocia, fractures, and the need for Cesarean section deliveries. Very high blood sugar levels can increase the risk of stillbirth. Maternal hyperglycemia can stimulate fetal hyperinsulinemia, and lead to neonatal hypoglycemia when the glucose supply (umbilical cord) is cut. Because of all these increased risks, home deliveries are not typically recommended for women with any form of diabetes. As many as two thirds of all women with diabetes have unplanned pregnancies and most women don’t realize that they’re pregnant until six or more weeks into the pregnancy. That’s why it’s critically important for women who have diabetes to use contraception and achieve tight blood sugar control prior to conception. Many health-care providers suggest at least three to six months of stable blood sugar control prior to attempting to conceive. Hemoglobin A1c should be within 1 percentage point above the lab normal, which means striving for a HbA1c of less than 7 percent. Women using or Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 220 mg/dl after eating? (or 12.21mmol/l) Blood sugar 220 mg/dl (12.21mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 220 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 80mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones s Continue reading >>

Q&a: How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It’s Over 200 Mg/dl

Q&a: How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It’s Over 200 Mg/dl

Q: How do I lower my blood sugar when it goes over 200 mg/dl? I have Type 2 diabetes. A: An excellent question, but a complicated one to answer. Your doctor or nurse educator should be contacted any time your blood sugar runs consistently higher than 250 mg/dl for more than two days. When a person with Type 2 diabetes encounters a high blood sugar, the strategy used in bringing it down will vary from individual to individual. This is because of the differences in treatment concerning diet, exercise, and medication. It will also depend upon the guidelines for glucose control that you and your doctor have mutually agreed upon. When high blood sugars do occur, there are a number of strategies that can be employed to adjust the glucose level back down to a normal range. These might include: 1) Eating less food at the next meal, eliminating a snack and/or eating foods with a lower glycemic index. A general rule of thumb to follow is decreasing 15 grams of carbohydrate (the amount found in one starch exchange, one fruit exchange, or one cup skim milk exchange) will lower blood glucose by 30 mg/dl. If you test your blood sugar at 182 mg/dl before a meal or snack, then eliminate one starch and one cup milk at the next meal to bring the glucose value as close to 120 mg/dl as a baseline. Although people with diabetes will respond differently to this adjustment, it provides a basic guideline to start with. For persons with Type 2 diabetes who are overweight, the loss of only 5% to 10% of total weight loss can dramatically improve blood glucose values (so just cutting calories moderately can achieve better blood glucose control). Lastly, choosing foods with a lower glycemic index, i.e., foods that do not raise blood sugar as quickly or dramatically, can help to bring blood glucose Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

Blood sugar control is a main goal for people living with type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar levels can lead to a variety of complications over time, including nerve damage, heart disease, and vision problems. Blood sugar levels that are too low can cause more immediate problems, such as dizziness, confusion, and potentially a loss of consciousness. Keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible is key to preventing these complications and living well with type 2 diabetes. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Glucose, or blood sugar, comes from two places — the food you eat and your liver. “Blood sugar is basically used to supply energy to the body,” explains Deborah Jane Wexler, MD, an endocrinologist in practice at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. For instance, one of your most valued organs — your brain — runs entirely on glucose, she notes. Insulin is used to move glucose into cells to be used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the blood, leading to high blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar can occur when you take too much diabetes medication, skip a meal, or increase your physical activity. Monitoring your blood sugar — by making sure it doesn’t spike too high or dip too low — is an important part of managing your type 2 diabetes. And you can start by learning the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and steps to take to bring those levels back to normal: Hypoglycemia: If blood sugar is too low — usually below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — you may have symptoms such as confusion, sweating, nervousness, nausea, and dizziness. You could even pass out Continue reading >>

220 Fasting Today What To Do

220 Fasting Today What To Do

Why does exercise work so well for some people? That's amazing! Good job! I do a one mile walk and my sugar is the same or a little higher after. Theoretically it should work for everyone, but alas that's not real life. Probably many people exercise too hard and/or too much which the body will perceive as a stress and the liver will dump more glucose into the blood. My understanding is that about an hour or so after eating is the best time for some exercise, nothing strenuous, as this will help the glucose out of the blood and into the cells. Theoretically it should work for everyone, but alas that's not real life. Probably many people exercise too hard and/or too much which the body will perceive as a stress and the liver will dump more glucose into the blood. My understanding is that about an hour or so after eating is the best time for some exercise, nothing strenuous, as this will help the glucose out of the blood and into the cells. I think I remember reading something in Dr. Bernstein's book, when he was talking about exercise & type 1 diabetes. I think I recall him saying something to the effect that exercise doesn't usually help the blood sugar of a type 1? I need to look this up. I guess this would make sense for me as well, since I don't have a typical type 2 diabetes, where I can do without basal insulin. (I need basal insulin, exercise does nothing for me, and if I don't eat low carb diet (40g per day) I have to inject insulin during meal time as well.). (I also have to inject insulin to correct for dawn phenomenon, infection, steroids (e.g. asthma inhaler), etc..) Ok yesterdays fasting was a 150 today was about the same a 149 still going down only been on meds for 10 days counting today doing good on my diet but can do better lots and lots of stress I'm wo Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 220 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Nerve damage, nerve pain and numbness or tingling in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy) Individuals with diabetes are not able to convert blood sugar into energy either because on insufficient levels of insulin or because their insulin is simply not functioning correctly. This means that glucose stays in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Diabetes takes two distinct forms: Type 1 and type 2. Diagnosing hyperglycemia is done by assessing symptoms and performing a simple blood glucose test. Depending on the severity of the condition and which type of diabetes the patient is diagnosed with, insulin and a variety of medication may be prescribed to help the person keep their blood sugar under control. Insulin comes in short, long and fast-acting forms, and a person suffering from type 1 diabetes is likely to be prescribed some combination of these. Individuals who are either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or are considered at risk for the disease are recommended to make alterations to their diet, lifestyle habits and exercise routine in order to lower blood sugar and keep it under control. These changes generally help to improve blood glucose control, individuals with type 2 diabetes may require medication eventually. These can include glitazones, acarbose, glucophage or sulphonylureas. Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. That includes the little things you do every day, such as what you eat and how active you are. Start by avoiding these common mistakes. Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day. “You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University. You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule. You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes. “Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other." It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent. “Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen right away,” says UCLA endocrinologist Preethi Srikanthan, MD. “But it has taken them a decade or two to get to this point, and it will take a while for them to even get to that initial 5% to 10% reduction in weight.” To make a lasting change, take small steps, Ahmann says. If you try to do more than you can handle, you might quit. Before you start a new exercise program, talk with your doctor, especially if you aren’t active now. They can help you set goals and plan a routine that’s safe and effective. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies, Diagnosis And Clinical Management: Sick-day Rules In Diabetes, Case Studies

Diabetic Emergencies, Diagnosis And Clinical Management: Sick-day Rules In Diabetes, Case Studies

Konstantinos Makrilakis, Nikolaos Katsilambros A 28-year-old man with Type 1 diabetes for 12 years is under treatment with long-lasting insulin (e.g., insulin glargine) 26 IU at bedtime and a rapid-acting insulin analog (e.g., insulin lispro) three times a day before each meal (the dose determined depending on the carbohydrate content of the meal and the preprandial blood glucose level. The usual daily dose of insulin lispro is 22-24 IU). His glycemic control is quite good (recent HbA1c: 6.7%). The patient calls his physician in the morning because he has been vomiting all night, has developed abdominal pains, and has a temperature of 38° C (100.4° F). His blood glucose level in the morning was 312 mg/dl (17.3 mmol/L). He was out at a party the previous night and was not able to hold anything down this morning, not even water. The doctor initially asked the patient to check his urine for ketones with a special urine strip (that the patient had been instructed in the past to have at home) and call him back. A few minutes later the patient informed the doctor that the urine test was positive for ketones (2+). Based on the guidelines analyzed above, the doctor recommended the injection of 10 IU of insulin lispro subcutaneously (20% of the total daily dose) and repeat blood glucose measurement and ketones in 2-3 hours. At the same time he asked the patient to try to sip tea slowly (at least one cup every 30-45 minutes), and to call again if urine ketones persisted after 6 hours (or earlier if they increased) or if blood glucose level was persistently higher than 300 mg/dl (16.7 mmol/L), despite the administration of insulin. Two and a half hours later the patient had a blood glucose level of 230 mg/dl (12.8 mmol/L) and urine ketones had decreased to 1+. The tea had been r Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Throughout The Day - For Normal People And Those With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Throughout The Day - For Normal People And Those With Diabetes

Most of us have heard the term blood sugar bandied around enough that we think we know what it means, but few of us really understand the complexity of the system that makes a steady supply of fuel available to our cells around the clock. The basic facts are these: All animals have a small amount of a simple sugar called glucose floating around in their bloodstream all the time. This simple sugar is one of two fuels that the cells of the body can burn for fuel. The other is fat. Though you may occasionally eat pure glucose--it's called "dextrose" when it is found in the list of ingredients on a U.S. food label--most of the glucose in your blood doesn't come from eating glucose. It is produced when your digestive system breaks down the larger molecules of complex sugars and starch. Sugars like those found in table sugar, corn syrup, milk and fruit and the starches found in flour, potatoes, rice, and beans all contain chains of glucose that are bonded together with other substances. During digestion, enzymes break these bonds and liberate the glucose molecules which are then absorbed into your bloodstream. How Blood Sugar is Measured Blood sugar concentrations are described using a number that describes the weight of glucose that is found in a specific volume of blood. In the U.S. that measurement is milligrams per deciliter, which is abbreviated as "mg/dl." Europeans and almost all researchers publishing in medical journals use a different measurement, micromoles per liter, abbreviated "mmol/L." You can convert any European measurements you encounter to the American standard by multiplying the mmol/L number by 18. There's a handy converter online that will do this for you automatically. You'll find it at If a blood test says that your blood sugar is 85 mg/dl this means t Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose And Insulin

Blood Glucose And Insulin

Checking Your Blood Glucose Q: WHY SHOULD I MONITOR MY BLOOD GLUCOSE? A: Checking your blood glucose gives you the information you need to understand how your diabetes treatment plan is working. Check your blood glucose several times per day at specific times, such as before a meal and two hours after. Look at the results from a period of several days or a week. You can see patterns in the times your blood glucose is up or down. You’ll see how your food, a regular walk, a stressful day or the addition of a new medication affects your blood glucose. Q: WHERE DO I BEGIN? A: First, talk with your health care providers to set your blood glucose targets. If your blood glucose is not within your target range most of the time, work with your health care provider, diabetes educator and/or Walgreens pharmacist to review your blood glucose monitoring records. Perhaps a simple change, such as being more physically active or eating different foods, can help you get closer to your targets. Over time, you will learn more about how to keep your blood glucose levels on track. Q: WHAT IS THE A1C TEST? A: Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the A1c test is the most accurate, important and meaningful test for finding out your overall glucose control. A1c shows your average blood glucose for the two months to three months before the test. It also tells you your risk for complications. Research has shown that the closer your A1c is to normal (six percent or less), the less likely you are to develop complications, such as damage to the retina, kidney disease or nerve damage. It’s helpful to compare the A1c test result with your blood glucose monitoring results. Ask yourself if they make sense. If they don’t, you may need to check your blood glucose more often or at different ti Continue reading >>

I Am Type Diabetic My Glucose Is Or In The Morni... | Diabetic Connect

I Am Type Diabetic My Glucose Is Or In The Morni... | Diabetic Connect

I am type 2 diabetic. My glucose is 200 or 220 in the morning when I get up. I sometimes have a protein snack at bedtime. I eat a healthy dinner. I dont know why it is so high only in the morning. It gradually goes down to about 120 to 140 at noon then stays lower all day. I am not eating the wrong things. Can you please tell me why this is? I am taking four 500 mg Metformin, two 5 mg glyburide, and one 25 mg Januvia daily. Its actually common for people to wake up with higher blood glucose readings in the morning. This can occur for a number of reasons, but one of the main reasons is that insulin resistance increases during the overnight hours due to the release of certain hormones, such as cortisol. As a result, blood glucose levels increase. This is a condition called the dawn phenomenon. Other reasons for high morning blood glucose include rebounding from a low blood glucose overnight, and eating too much carbohydrate at dinner or at a bedtime snack. You may first want to rule out hypoglycemia in the middle of the night by setting your alarm and checking your blood glucose at, say, 3 am. Then, double check that youre not overdoing the carbs at dinner (generally, 45 to 60 grams is a goal to aim for). However, in the event that you may be experiencing this dawn phenomenon, talk to your physician about your options. You may need to increase your dose of glyburide in the evening. If that isnt sufficient to lower your fasting glucose, bedtime insulin is another option. Continue reading >>

Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels

Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels

What are the dangerous levels for blood sugar? What is a dangerously high blood sugar level? How low a blood glucose reading is dangerous? I understand that all the above questions are huge problems for the diabetic mind and health. Don’t worry. Relax. Remember: stress is your enemy in your fight against diabetes. Why? During stress, your body produces some hormones that increase the blood sugar levels, and at the same time, they inhibit the insulin function. No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more As a consequence, you’ll have high blood sugar levels, which will help you face your “stress situation”. On the other hand, these levels can reach the highest peak (uncontrollable), and then, they are considered as dangerous high blood glucose level. What are the dangerously high blood sugar levels? Normally, in a diabetic, blood sugar levels will always stay high. During stress, more “sugar” is added to your blood, which then, turn to “become” dangerous. This is because your body will find it hard to bring them normal again. Furthermore, persistent high blood glucose level will cause many problems to all your body cells. How to recognize and distinguish these dangerous levels? All you need to do is to regularly check your glucose level. In case your blood sugar level is more than 200 mg/dl, persisting for more than two days, then this is considered as dangerous level, and you need further evaluation. Then, if you check your blood sugar, and have results higher than 300 mg/dl, together with urine incontinence, dry and cracked tongue, all these figures show you the danger of your situation too. Therefore, it’s time to search for specialist help. When you Continue reading >>

Morning Highs? How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

Morning Highs? How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

Is Reversal Possible? You can't completely reverse the hormonal imbalance of type 2 diabetes, but a combination of actions can solve the high fasting blood glucose problem. "With your health care provider's guidance, experiment to find what works for you," says Arlene Monk, R.D., CDE, a dietitian and diabetes educator at the International Diabetes Center at Park Nicollet in Minneapolis. The following tips offer some actions that may improve morning numbers. Start, Change, or Add Medication As guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists suggest, "Most people need to start a blood glucose-lowering drug at diagnosis to fight the insulin resistance and resulting hormonal imbalance," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE. The most common starting medication, metformin, cuts down on glucose overproduction overnight. Beth DeLauder, 46, PWD type 2, takes metformin, as does Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. Both say it's been one factor among many lifestyle changes to help lower their fasting blood sugar levels. Newer drugs are prescribed as starting or add-on medications when blood glucose goals aren't met. The oral dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors sitagliptin (Januvia) and saxagliptin (Onglyza) keep more of the GLP-1 hormone circulating. The more potent injectable GLP-1 agonists exenatide (Byetta) (twice daily) and liraglutide (Victoza) (once daily) increase the amount of GLP-1 available. They're in the class of incretin mimetics, also called GLP-1 analogs. Some people also experience weight loss while using GLP-1 analogs "As type 2 progresses, especially beyond 10 years, many people need to add insulin to control fasting and other blood glucose levels through the day," Irons says. "When starting insulin, most providers use Continue reading >>

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