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What To Do If Blood Sugar Is 190

Blood Sugar Level 190 After Eating

Blood Sugar Level 190 After Eating

by DD (Ar) QUESTION: Hi, No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more My blood sugar level after eating is 190. What can I do to lower the level immediately? ANSWER: Hi there, Thank you for sharing your concern with us. It is normal for blood sugar to get raised after eating. If you measured your blood glucose less than 2 hours after eating, then, I'd suggest to wait until 2-3 hours after eating to repeat the testing. If you are on diabetes drug, you can take them as prescribed by your doctor. It is not advised to lower high blood sugar immediately as it might cause severe hypoglycemia associated with other severe problems. I advise to keep following the healthy lifestyle and diet changes together with regular taking of diabetes medications. If this is not enough, try another natural alternative. Click here to learn more. All the best! Dr.Alba QUERY: After food sugar level My sugar level after 2 hours of food is 196. Is it very alarming. I do take glycomet one tab daily. Any suggestion for rectifying the level. Answer: Hi back, I understand your concern. Please follow this link to get your full answer. Thank you. QUERY: Believe it or not, going 23 years, I have been getting high blood sugar readings 4x/day, after each meal and when I wake up in the morning, and they have yet to do damage to my health. So, what am I saying? I don't worry about them. Am I saying then that high blood sugar levels are not bad? No, not really. What I am actually saying is that all the high blood sugar levels I have been getting are all short-lived. On their own, they come down to normal levels. How? I don't know because I am not an expert on this. Why are they short-lived? Because my only ant Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

During pregnancy, some women develop high blood sugar levels. This condition is known as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). GDM typically develops between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it’s estimated to occur in up to 9.2 percent of pregnancies. If you develop GDM while you’re pregnant, it doesn’t mean that you had diabetes before your pregnancy or will have it afterward. But GDM does raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. If poorly managed, it can also raise your child’s risk of developing diabetes and add other risk factors to you and your baby during pregnancy and delivery. It’s rare for GDM to cause symptoms. If you do experience symptoms, they will likely be mild. They may include: fatigue blurred vision excessive thirst excessive need to urinate The exact cause of GDM is unknown, but hormones likely play a role. When you’re pregnant, your body produces larger amounts of some hormones, including: human placental lactogen estrogen hormones that increase insulin resistance These hormones affect your placenta and help sustain your pregnancy. Over time, the amount of these hormones in your body increases. They may interfere with the action of insulin, the hormone that regulates your blood sugar. Insulin helps move glucose out of your blood into cells, where it’s used for energy. If you don’t have enough insulin, or you have high levels of hormones that prevent insulin from working properly, your blood glucose levels may rise. This can cause GDM. You’re at higher risk of developing GDM if you: are over the age of 25 have high blood pressure have a family history of diabetes were overweight before you became pregnant have previously given birth to a baby weighin Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes

Diagnosing Diabetes

In diagnosing diabetes, physicians primarily depend upon the results of specific glucose tests. However, test results are just part of the information that goes into the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Doctors also take into account your physical exam, presence or absence of symptoms, and medical history. Some people who are significantly ill will have transient problems with elevated blood sugars, which will then return to normal after the illness has resolved. Also, some medications may alter your blood glucose levels (most commonly steroids and certain diuretics, such as water pills). The 2 main tests used to measure the presence of blood sugar problems are the direct measurement of glucose levels in the blood during an overnight fast and measurement of the body's ability to appropriately handle the excess sugar presented after drinking a high glucose drink. Fasting Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar) Level A value above 126 mg/dL on at least 2 occasions typically means a person has diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is one that can be performed in a doctor's office or a lab. The person being tested starts the test in a fasting state (having no food or drink except water for at least 10 hours but not greater than 16 hours). An initial blood sugar is drawn and then the person is given a "glucola" bottle with a high amount of sugar in it (75 grams of glucose or 100 grams for pregnant women). The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drinking the high glucose drink. For the test to give reliable results, you must be in good health (not have any other illnesses, not even a cold). Also, you should be normally active (for example, not lying down or confined to a bed like a patient in a Continue reading >>

What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Above Which It Is Dangerous?

What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Above Which It Is Dangerous?

There is no straight forward way to answer this question. If you are a type 1 diabetic, your blood sugar may sky rocket to 400 or 500 if you miss an insulin injection before eating, or if your insulin pump malfunctions, etc. If you realize it quickly and correct it with insulin, there is little to no problem. Blood sugars that are elevated for a prolonged period of time for a type 1 can lead to DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis), which is life threatening and can certainly end in death if not treated. Prolonged elevated blood sugars can lead to dehydration, acidosis and electrolyte shifting. There are dangers associated with fixing these blood sugars too rapidly, and it’s best to go to a hospital where trained medical staff can monitor you. I have seen people come in to this hospital with DKA with glucose levels in the 300–700s. Blood sugars that are moderately elevated (150–250) won’t lead to immediate death and danger, but can cause long term damage of nerves and organs (kidneys, eyes, etc). Elevated blood sugars in an individual without diabetes is a different situation. If you are not diabetic and eat a ton of sugar, your blood glucose might be in the 200s immediately after eating, but your body will correct this and you will be FINE. *Also of note, if you have gestational diabetes, elevated sugars can cause issues with fetal development, so while it’s not too dangerous for the mother per se, it can have poor outcomes for the baby. Continue reading >>

How Can I Fight Morning Highs?

How Can I Fight Morning Highs?

My morning blood glucose is quite elevated (190 to 260 mg/dl). Is there a certain time before bed that I should eat to help lower my blood sugar? Are there certain foods I should eat after dinner? Continue reading >>

12 Healthy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

12 Healthy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Make these simple lifestyle tweaks to feel great all day. Whether you have diabetes or prediabetes—or just generally suffer ill effects from crazy blood sugar swings—you want to know what really works to control your sugar levels. It can make all the difference in living well and staying off the blood sugar roller coaster that can drag down your mood and energy and skew your hunger levels. Here are a dozen tips that will help your blood sugar and your overall health. (If you have diabetes, remember you should always work with your health care team first.) Being naturally thin is not license to stay on your butt. Even for adults at a healthy weight, those who classify as couch potatoes have higher blood sugar than those who are more active, according to a 2017 study from the University of Florida. That can put you at risk for prediabetes, even if you have a normal BMI. Take the stairs, head to the grocery store on foot (if possible), keep that promise to your dog to take him on a walk, and go for that weekend bike ride. Aim for 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. In your effort to eat more quinoa, you might have forgotten about an oldie-but-goodie carb: barley. This whole grain is packed with fiber that tamps down your appetite and can help decrease blood sugar, according to a Swedish study published in the journal Cell Metabolism. Why? Your gut bacteria interacts with barley, which may in turn help your body metabolize glucose (sugar). Besides, 1 cup contains 6 grams of fiber, which helps to mute blood sugar spikes. Don't be afraid to toss it in soups, on a roasted veggie salad, or have it as a side to fish or chicken. Exercise is a great way to boost your body's ability to manage blood sugar, but making sure it's a heart-pumping workout will help e Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

Blood Sugar Testing 101 for People with Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What to Do I am a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, have run Diabetes Centers in hospitals, have a private practice in medical nutrition therapy specializing in metabolic syndrome, weight loss, and type 2 diabetes, and have written a NY Times Bestselling book on the same topics. January 10, 2012 was the world-wide release of my newest book, The Diabetes Miracle . Guess what? If you asked me what my blood sugar is right now, I have no idea. Neither do you! Did you know that unless your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL, you most likely will have none of the traditional diabetes symptoms such as excessive thirst, urination, fatigue, hunger, or wounds that will not heal? If youve run blood sugar over 200mg/dL for a period of time, you probably wont even have symptoms when your sugar exceeds that 200mg/dL point. If you have been prescribed medication for diabetes that is aimed at reducing your blood sugar and you begin to feel shaky, dizzy, nauseated, cant speak clearly, cant think, feel wiped out.you may assume that you are hypoglycemic. Are you? Without testing, you really have no ideayour once high readings may have returned to normal rangeand your body may assume you are hypoglycemic when you are far from it! If you grab some juice or glucose tabs, you will push that normal sugar right back into the very high range. Or maybe those symptoms really are hypoglycemia and if you dont treat it, you will lose consciousness, fall down the stairs, drop your child, run off the road. Your Hemoglobin A1C might be 6.3 and you think to yourself: Wow, my blood sugar is now normalwhy should I spend the money and take the time to test? Do you realize that hemoglobin A1C is your average blood sugar 24 ho Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Use the chart below to help understand how different test results can indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes Fasting Blood Glucose Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) Random Blood Sugar (taken any time of day with or without fasting) A1C Ideal Result Less than 100mg/dl Less than 140 mg/dl Less than 140 (even after eating a large meal) Less than 5.7% Pre-diabetes 100-125mg/dl 140-199mg/dl 140-200 5.7% to 6.4% Diabetes 126mg/dl and greater 200 mg/dl and greater 200 or greater 6.5% or more Q: I have been told that I have diabetes, or "pre-diabetes", or that I am in the "honeymoon period" . My readings are all over the place: sometimes in the 120's, others in the 90's, sometimes, but rarely in the 150-170's. My doctor does not want to put me on medication yet. I exercise regularly and am not overweight though my diet is variable. I certainly like sweets, pizza, and pasta. What is the long term effect of these continued high blood sugar levels? A: Firstly, kudos for your physician for giving diet/lifestyle changes a chance to work. Reduction of body fat often is the first best start. This may or may not be true in your case but certainly sweets, pizza, etc. are affecting your numbers. If you can discipline yourself at this time to eat unrefined foods and be more active, your beta cells that produce insulin may get the rest they need to become efficient again. Our diabetes management booklet has many referenced foods/supplements that may help to stabilize your glucose levels. In time, your favorite foods may be reintroduced in moderate amounts. You appear to be more in the pre-diabetes range at this time. Complications are a long process. If your daytime levels stay under 120-140, that is good. Fasting levels are higher due to hormonal activity nighttime; these levels are a much sl Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Control diabetes with blood sugar level chart for a healthy diet .A Blood Sugar Level Chart is a reference for health care practitioners to use with their diabetic patients. This type of chart can also be of use when screening patents to determine if they may be at risk of developing this health condition. A quick and easy chart can also come in handy for individuals to use when they are trying to learn more about how blood glucose levels can impact their health. Normal Blood Sugar levels stay in a fairly tight range of numbers. Someone without diabetes may expect their glucose level to be in the 80-100 range if it has been 6 hours or more since they last consumed food or beverages. Individuals without diabetes will experience a rise in their glucose level after they are given food to eat. Immediately after consuming a meal or snack their glucose may read in the range of 170-200. If the glucose level is checked 2-3 hours after a meal then the increase in glucose will only be noted as 120-140. A diabetic patient can have widely different number readings when their glucose is checked. A fasting glucose level for these individuals could be very low or it may read as 126 or higher. Immediately after a meal the amount of glucose in their bloodstream might read in the 220-300+ range. Even when glucose readings are checked a few hours after meals diabetic patients will often register glucose levels that are in excess of 200. Those patients with diabetes who are under the care of a doctor, and choosing healthy foods to eat may be expected to register blood glucose readings that are more stable. Many diabetics will discover that their blood glucose is usually within the normal range if they are being properly treated for this chronic disease. If the doctor has alerted you to th Continue reading >>

My Blood Sugar Is 190 Right Now, What Can I Do To Lower It?

My Blood Sugar Is 190 Right Now, What Can I Do To Lower It?

My blood sugar is 190 right now, what can I do to lower it? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: You didn't provide enough information to say. What did you eat prior to measuring? Are you diabetic? Are you on meds? How long ago was the last time you had a meal? Are you producing insulin still? Is your diabetes the insulin resistant type or the not-enough insulin type? 190 isn't normal for a non-diabetic person eating a typical high-carb diet. Like others have said, you may need to inject a little more insulin, if you take insulin. Exercise can help, but that's true mainly if you're insulin resistant and not if you aren't producing enough insulin. Source(s): Reverse Any Diabetes Easily - Source(s): My Diabetes Gone Completely - YES you do have diabetes. Even if you control it you will still have the disease once diagnosed you have it for life Sugar is only excreted in the urine when it is very high in the blood and is not a good thing. I have no idea what you mean by bubbly urine and is not a symptom I have heard about with diabetes. You might not notice the thirst if you already drink enough and as for slow healing wounds this is worse the higher the sugar level and is not always noticeable. Your last blood sugar reading is lower than it was but still higher than normal and you are taking medication as well as watching your diet and exercising (I hope) so if you stopped these things it would soon go back to the 290 or higher For the best answers, search on this site I'd say exercise and lower your intake of sugar or carb enriched foods. Light exercise has been proven time and time again to lower blood sugar levels and promote health. Carbs and sugary products are known to raise blood sugar levels. I suggest eating 4-5 five light meals a day to help Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Who Gets Diabetes and How to Manage It Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can lead to serious health complications if left untreated. Several factors, such as body weight, family history and race and ethnicity may increase your risk of diabetes. Diabetes can be effectively managed by exercising and eating a healthy diet. What is diabetes? Diabetes (medically known as diabetes mellitus) is a common, chronic disorder marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, or sugar. It occurs when your cells don’t respond appropriately to insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas), and when your pancreas can’t produce more insulin in response. Diabetes usually can’t be cured. Left untreated—or poorly managed—it can lead to serious long-term complications, including kidney failure, amputation, and blindness. Moreover, having diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. Your body and sugar To understand diabetes, it’s helpful to understand the basics of how your body metabolizes (breaks down) sugar. Most of the cells in your body need sugar as a source of energy. When you eat carbohydrates, such as a bowl of pasta or some vegetables, your digestive system breaks the carbohydrates down into simple sugars such as glucose, which travel into and through your bloodstream to nourish and energize cells. A key player in the breakdown of sugar is the pancreas, a fish-shaped gland behind your stomach and liver. The pancreas fills two roles. It produces enzymes that flow into the small intestine to help break down the nutrients in your food—proteins, carbohydrates, and fats—to provide sources of energy and building material for the body’s cells. It makes hormones that regulate the disposal of nutrients, including sugars. Cells in Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. That includes the little things you do every day, such as what you eat and how active you are. Start by avoiding these common mistakes. Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day. “You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University. You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule. You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes. “Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other." It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent. “Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen right away,” says UCLA endocrinologist Preethi Srikanthan, MD. “But it has taken them a decade or two to get to this point, and it will take a while for them to even get to that initial 5% to 10% reduction in weight.” To make a lasting change, take small steps, Ahmann says. If you try to do more than you can handle, you might quit. Before you start a new exercise program, talk with your doctor, especially if you aren’t active now. They can help you set goals and plan a routine that’s safe and effective. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 190 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 190 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 190 mg/dl after eating? (or 10.54mmol/l) Blood sugar 190 mg/dl (10.54mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 190 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 50mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones s Continue reading >>

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