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What Teachers Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

Tips For Teachers: American Diabetes Association

Tips For Teachers: American Diabetes Association

The information provided below is meant to help inform teachers about how to keep kids with diabetes safe at school. Learn as much as you can about diabetes. Knowledge is power. Become aware of essential diabetes care tasks and be prepared to respond in the event of a diabetes emergency. Your willingness to learn will help to ensure a safe classroom environment and optimize your student's success and participation. Every student with diabetes is different. Students may use different therapies to manage their diabetes. Some need help and some are independent. Learn about your student's diabetes and how you can best respond and support. Provide a supportive learning environment. It is important to provide a classroom environment that enables the student to have unrestricted access to needed care. Depending upon the student's level of independence, he or she should be allowed to self-manage their diabetes and should have unrestricted access to the school nurse and other trained school personnel. Collaborate with other school staff. Teachers and other school staff members with supervisory responsibility for the student should participate in team meetings and understand your role in implementing the student's diabetes care plan and written accommodations plan. Understand federal and state legal protections for the student with diabetes. Become familiar with federal and state laws that protect students with diabetes and understand your role in the development and implementation of the student's written plans. Provide modifications as set out in the student's written accommodation plan. Familiarize yourself with the modifications spelled out in the student's written plan(s). Always be prepared. A "low kit" containing food and other supplies to treat hypoglycemia should always Continue reading >>

8 Things Your Childs Teacher Should Know About T1d

8 Things Your Childs Teacher Should Know About T1d

8 Things Your Childs Teacher Should Know About T1D A parent crafts a note every teacher should have in their inbox if they have a student with Type 1 diabetes. Its that time of year back to school! New notebooks, new clothes, new bookbag, and new teachers that will need a crash course in diabetes education. When my son was first diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, we were two weeks into 4th grade. We were lucky in that his teacher has a child that had been diagnosed a year earlier with T1D. That first year was so much easier because she just understood. She even knew to stock up her desk drawer with juice boxes before I had a clue! But if the stars dont align so perfectly for you with your childs new teacher, here are 8 essential tips you can give to get your childs teacher up to speed on Type 1 diabetes. If you feel shy talking to them about this, you can just forward them this article: 1. Things change quickly. Blood sugars have a mind of their own and what my childs levels were at 8:15 a.m. have no bearing on his/her blood sugar levels five minutes later. Children can go high or low based on a zillion different factors that scientists cant quantify. 2. Blood glucose numbers are not bad and they are not good; they just are. A child is at his/her best and in no danger when in a target blood sugar range. The numbers simply provide information that can be acted upon. If a childs blood glucose levels go high, the child needs to have a bolus shot of insulin and to drink water. If they go low, the child needs to be treated with the right food and re-checked. In the target range let it be. 3. My childs body works differently. He or she will snack, drink, and use the bathroom more often than average based on blood sugar levels. Please allow them the space for that flexibility. 4 Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Teachers Of Students With Diabetes

10 Tips For Teachers Of Students With Diabetes

Home Education and Information 10 Tips for Teachers of Students with Diabetes 10 Tips for Teachers of Students with Diabetes Posted by Editorial Team On August 14, 2014 In Education and Information The upcoming school year is approaching and its time to start preparing your children for a successful year. If one (or more) of them live with diabetes, you have a little more planning than most to think about. Elementary school Principal with type 1 diabetes and MiniMed Ambassador, Vince Myers , who you may remember from Life is a Journey, Not a Race , provides his 10 tips for you to share with your childrens teachers in preparation of the new school year. A printed copy of these tips can also come in handy when a teacher is absent and a substitute teacher is filling in. We hope this will be of value to all educators, particularly those who have never had a student with diabetes in their classroom. Every child with diabetes may experience different symptoms of low blood sugar. Some of these symptoms could include weakness and/or fatigue, headaches, sweating, irritability, shaking, excessive hunger and rapid heart rate. Situations that may affect blood sugar include insulin intake, food consumption, exercise, illness, stress, and changes in routine. Your student will likely need to eat snacks during class when they feel low. This is imperative and essential in helping make sure their blood sugar doesnt drop too low. You can help your student by allowing them to keep an emergency stash of snacks (including fast-acting carbohydrates) in your classroom in case they forget. Most kids with diabetes dont want to and shouldnt be treated differently. Do not limit their activities, draw attention, or deny their request if they have or ask for water, a snack, blood sugar test, or bat Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Kids: What Your Childs Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

Diabetes In Kids: What Your Childs Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

Diabetes in Kids: What Your Childs Teacher Should Know to Manage Diabetes at School Diabetes in Kids: What Your Childs Teacher Should Know to Manage Diabetes at School Every parent worries about sending their child away to school. Are they going to make friends? Will they do well in their studies? Will they miss us? But for parents of children with Type 1 Diabetes, that worry is magnified. What will they do if they forget to take their insulin? Will they be excluded because of their dietary restrictions? Will school administrators know how to spot and handle a hypo? Managing diabetes in kids can be a challenge, and even more challenging when its a young child who isnt old enough to take care of themselves and articulate when they feel like their blood sugar is low. There are, however, steps you can take to ensure that your child, their teachers, and school administrators are in the best position to care for your young one while youre not around. Before we jump right in, theres an excellent webinar from the American Diabetes Association that talks about preparing to send your kids back to school, armed with diabetes management strategies here . Also, Diabetes UK has an entire section of their website devoted to managing diabetes in a school setting . Now on to the good stuff. This cant be stressed enough. Well talk a little further down about putting together detailed instructions, testing schedules, and contingency plans in place for teachers. But first, its important to schedule a one-on-one meeting with the person or persons who will be administering or overseeing your childs blood glucose testing and insulin dosage. There are a couple of obvious benefits to this; the first being that it gives you a chance to educate teachers and administrators on diabetes (a lot of Continue reading >>

What Your Child’s Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

What Your Child’s Teacher Should Know To Manage Diabetes At School

Whether your child has been newly diagnosed or has been living with type 1 diabetes for some time, it’s very challenging. Many parents find it difficult to trust someone other than themselves or family members with training to care for their children. But when school time arises it will be time to send them off to be monitored and cared for by someone else many hours out of the day. Entrusting the medical needs of your child to someone else will be hard, but it’s a necessary step in teaching them to be more independent and live a happy, social life despite having type 1 diabetes. Parents Responsibilities for School It is your job, as your child’s parent to help create an environment when they are at school where they feel safe, cared for properly and treated equally to other students. With the proper planning and preparation, you provide this environment with the help of their teachers and school staff. The first step is to take the initiative to educate staff and teachers on the care of a type 1 student. Many school staff members may not realize there are a few additional efforts which are required on their end to ensure a positive learning environment where the child with type 1 diabetes feels safe. I advice reading the following: Ensuring Success at School Advanced planning: By making sure you plan ahead of time you will help to enable your child how to problem solve specific situations in school involving their diabetes. Here is a great tip: remember even with proper planning and a well-organized family, there will still be times when your plans don’t go according to plan. Communication: Good communication with the school and yourself is crucial to your child’s safety and well-being while at school. It will also help to provide yourself with a peace of min Continue reading >>

Diabetes Advocacy...going To School

Diabetes Advocacy...going To School

Sending any child to school may often cause a parent great anxiety at leaving their little angel in the care of strangers for an extended period of time. This anxiety becomes ten-fold when sending a child with a chronic illness to school. No one can possibly care for our child like we do so how do you keep your child as safe as possible when you arent there? If you live in the USA, you ensure that you have a 504 Plan in place that outlines the quality of care and responsibilities legally required by the school. If you live in Canada the road is not as clear. In Canada, each board has a separate policy. If your board does not have a Diabetes Policy in place, approach them and ask that it be done. With the increased number of children being diagnosed with this disease, it is in their best interest to prepare specific policies relating to the care of students with this disease. Ask to have a say, investigate other policies and try to work out one that is mutually beneficial to all parties. Policy or not, 504 Plan or not, your child must still be educated and it is still the parents responsibility to do as much as they can to prepare the school to care for their child. Contact your school and ask for an in-service with all personnel who will be in contact with your child. Have your CDE or public health nurse attend to ensure that everyone is properly trained and aware of what is involved in having a child with Type 1 diabetes in their school. If your child is on an Insulin pump, you may wish to show the pump or have pictures of it made available so that everyone understands that it is a piece of medical equipment.You may also wish to go over some of the alarms so that staff are aware of what to do even if your child is either too young to understand or not able to communic Continue reading >>

5 Things Every Teacher Should Know About Diabetes:

5 Things Every Teacher Should Know About Diabetes:

5 Things Every Teacher Should Know About Diabetes Teachers: givers of knowledge, confidence, and advice. Teachers play a huge role in your kids lives. They are the role models at school, the all-knowing question answerers, the keepers of the hall passes. Your kids depend on them to tell them what they need to know, and you as parents depend on them to keep your kids safe at school. The beginning of a new school year often means new teachersand for you, that means another explanation of your childs diabetes and how it should be handled in the classroom. Start the school year off right by giving them a few basic pointers, and help them remain the well-informed mentors your kids have come to trust. 5 Things Every Teacher Should Know About Diabetes: 1. Most kids with diabetes dont want to be different, and they dont want to be treated differently. 2. It is very unlikely that they will pretend to feel high or low to get out of the classroom. Take them seriously, and never deny the childs request for water or a blood sugar test. 3. Kids who inject insulin may need a little extra time before lunch to accommodate their injection. 4. Kids with diabetes must be able to check their blood sugar levels. If the child has low blood sugar, he or she must have access to glucose. If he or she has high blood sugar, the child must be given access to water and the restroom. 5. Children with diabetes must have access to emergency glucose in case of hypoglycemia. If a doctor prescribes snacks for a child with diabetes, they must be allowed to eat. Coaches and gym teachers may need to keep glucose tablets on hand in case of hypoglycemia. The best thing parents can do is take preventative measures to keep their children safe at school. Educating your childs teachers, classmates, and school fac Continue reading >>

Notify New Teachers About Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes

Notify New Teachers About Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes

Summary: This is a sample email to notify new teachers at the beginning of the school year about your childs type 1 diabetes and highlight important aspects of the 504 plan. When Q was in grade school and had one main teacher, we usually set up a meeting with the teacher, nurse, and the staff member who oversaw her 504 plan a few days before school began or during the first week of school to go over her care. We also looped in any teachers that might see her during the day who hadnt already had her as a student before. Since Q is in middle school, she now has 8 different teachers during the day. Eight! This year I decided to send a quick email in advance of school starting to highlight a few important points. It isnt meant to cover all aspects of her daily diabetes management at school, but rather is intended as a heads up that Q will be in their class and to alert them of her medical condition. They will learn more at her upcoming annual 504 meeting. I decided to share my email here on D-Mom Blog in case other parents needed a starting point for their own communication with new teachers. Im also including the 10 Things Teachers Should Know About Diabetes and Glucagon PDFs below in case you would like to send those to staff or print them out. My name is LC and I am the parent of Q who will be in your class this year. Q has type 1 diabetes Im attaching a resource called 10 Things Teachers Should Know About Diabetes. Please take a few minutes to read this. I am also attaching a copy of Qs diabetes instructions. If you are a classroom teacher, you will receive a low blood sugar kit. This is a pink pencil box and includes juice boxes, peanut butter crackers, and Smarties. (The PE kit also includes glucagon and blood sugar testing supplies.) If supplies run low, please let Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Information For Teachers And Child-care Providers

Children With Diabetes - Information For Teachers And Child-care Providers

Information for Teachers and Child-Care Providers Teachers and child-care providers are likely to have a child with type 1 diabetes in their care at some point in their career. This page provides basic information about diabetes, offer suggestions for how to care for children with diabetes, and refers you to other sources of information. Type 1 diabetes, previously called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an autoimmune disease in which the body destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is required by the body to use glucose, the simple sugar into which foods are broken down by our digestive system. Without insulin, the body starves to death. It's important to note that everyone is insulin-dependent. People without diabetes make insulin in their pancreas. People with type 1 diabetes must inject insulin. Diabetes is not contagious. And though there is no cure, diabetes can be managed with insulin injections, blood sugar monitoring, proper diet and exercise. Children with diabetes face two problems that teachers need to understand: hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. You should learn the symptoms and how to treat each. Hypoglycemia , or low blood sugar, occurs when the blood sugar level is too low, due to too much insulin, too little food, or too much exercise. Children with low blood sugar sometimes behave erratically or act sleepy, and are often very hungry and shaky. Low blood sugar must be treated immediately by giving the child foods with simple sugars, such as glucose tablets, fruit juice or regular (NOT diet) soda. If you suspect that a child has low blood sugar, do not leave the child unattended because the child can lose consciousness. Never send a child who you suspect has a low blood sugar to the nurse or clinic alone. Hypergl Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Schools - Information For Teachers & Staff

Diabetes In Schools - Information For Teachers & Staff

Diabetes in schools - information for teachers & staff Diabetes in schools - information for teachers & staff This page is an overview of what teachers and staff should know about diabetes with links to further support and resources If you have a child with Type 1 diabetes in your care at school, youll know that theres a lot to think about. Or if a child with Type 1 diabetes is joining your school, there will be lots of things to put in place to ensure the child is cared for correctly. Over the past two years weve been busy supporting schools to put the right care in place for children with diabetes through our Type 1 diabetes: Make the grade campaign . Weve developed lots of easy to follow, free resources to help schools know what to do and how to do it. On this page you will find information on: Watch this video from the Safe in School campaign to hear from children, staff and parents about what good care involves. Students with Type 1 diabetes moving class in the same school Talk about if their childs classes are changing, or the staff responsible for caring for them at school. Let them know about any planned trips. And consider if there are any other changes that might affect them, such as changes to the school curriculum, timing of lunch and breaks or storage of medication and equipment. Ask parents if any aspects of the students care might change, or if there is any particular area they would like the schools help on, e.g. taking responsibility for certain aspects of care as the student grows up Arrange training for new carers, involve the diabetes nurse and parents in this. Allow time for new carers to work with current carers so that they build up their confidence and the student feels comfortable with them. Update the students individual healthcare plan if nec Continue reading >>

A Teacher’s Guide To Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

A Teacher’s Guide To Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is a part of our library of resources for Elementary/Primary School. Read more on test taking, diabetic alert dogs, class presentations and creating a school treatment plan. Being a teacher comes with the responsibility of taking care of 20-30 children on a daily basis. In your career, you may have a student with Type 1 diabetes in your class. Although you may feel overwhelmed about what to expect, there is no need! This guide will make you aware of the conditions of a child with T1D, which will give you a better understanding of how to keep him or her healthy and safe at school. What is Type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that occurs when a person’s own immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in their pancreas. People with Type 1 are insulin-dependent for life, and must manually give themselves insulin through multiple daily injections or an insulin pump. They must carefully balance insulin, food, exercise, and other factors in order to prevent or minimize serious short and long-term complications due to out of range blood sugar levels. If you have not heard much about Type 1, here are some other fast facts – T1D is not caused by a lack of exercise or eating too much sugar T1D is not contagious There is no cure for T1D at the present moment Although T1D has also been called “juvenile diabetes,” T1D affects both children and adults How can I help? It is important to remember that children with T1D can participate in all of the same activities as other kids, such as play sports and join activities. They can also eat sweets and any other type of food/drink, as long as they are giving themselves the appropriate amount of insulin to cover the meal. Some foods affect blood sugar levels differently than others. Read Continue reading >>

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes 10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes Children will not outgrow type 1 diabetes: With type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin have been destroyed. People with type 1 diabetes will always have to take insulin injections (until there is a cure). Changes in lifestyle or diet will not improve type 1 diabetes. Insulin is not a cure: But it is the only treatment. Without insulin, people with type 1 diabetes would die. It takes a lot of work to manage diabetes: Children with type 1 diabetes usually look healthy. Thats because they and their families are working hard to keep blood sugar levels in a target range. They do this by checking levels frequently, and acting quickly when neededsuch as adding insulin to account for a special treat, or having a snack because of extra physical activity. Technology is helpful, but it doesnt work on its own: Some students wear insulin pumps to deliver insulin. A pump is another way to deliver insulin, and whether or not to use a pump is an individual choice. Other students wear continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), which take blood sugar readings every few minutes. But none of these devices works on its own. People still have to carefully monitor blood sugar, food intake, and activity, and make decisions about how much insulin to give and when. Blood sugar levels can change quickly: Its important to check blood sugar often, because there are many factors that can cause it to change from minute to minute. Low blood sugar needs immediate attention: If a student feels low, or you suspect a student is low, act right away. Do not leave the student alone. Check blood sugar, and give fast-acting sugar as needed. High blood sugar means extra trips to t Continue reading >>

10 Things Your Teacher Should Know About Type One Diabetes - Danii Foundation

10 Things Your Teacher Should Know About Type One Diabetes - Danii Foundation

10 Things your teacher should know about type ONE diabetes 10 Things your teacher should know about type ONE diabetes 10 things teachers should know about having a student with type ONE diabetes When your student has type 1 diabetes, the body doesnt make the insulin needed to metabolise sugar into energy. People with type 1 must either give injections of insulin or wear an insulin pump to stay alive. Basic info: Food raises blood sugar. Exercise and activity lower blood sugar. It is hard to have diabetes, even when I have an insulin pump. My blood sugars will vary every day and there is no such thing as control with Type 1. Please be patient while I deal with low and high blood sugars. 2. I wear super cool gadgets that help keep me alive. My insulin pump and/or continuous glucose monitor may look like the latest iPod or mobile phone some alarms even sound like a ring tone. Please dont take them away from me you would be putting my health in danger. I need to keep glucose tabs and snacks in my desk (or pockets) in case of emergency. If go low, even a trip to the nurses office could be too risky without immediate fast acting sugar. 4. I may not be brave enough to speak up for myself I depend on you to put my health and well-being first. Its not always easy to speak up when Im low or high and need to take care of diabetes. It helps to know youre looking out for my best interests. 5. I need immediate attention when I tell you I feel low I may also need your help. Please give me a snack or let me check my blood sugar immediately. Dont leave me alone or send me to the nurses office by myself. My body and brain wont be functioning properly and I could make a wrong turn or collapse in the hallway. I also cannot finish a test or complete my work until I have treated my low. 6. Continue reading >>

What Your Childs Teacher Doesnt Know About Type 1

What Your Childs Teacher Doesnt Know About Type 1

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney What Your Childs Teacher Doesnt Know About Type 1 Hallie Addington, guest blogger, ThePrincessAndThePump.com Nothing strikes fear in a parents heart like sending a child with type 1 diabetes to school. Whether the child is returning to class for the first time after diagnosis, or its the start of a new school year, handing him or her off to school personnel can bring anxiety and uncertainty. After all, who knows better how to take care of our children than us?!? We watch our friends count down the days until school starts (or a mid-year vacation ends) with glee and anticipation. We hear them talk about their concerns that their child will have friends in a new class and that the bus will come when it is scheduled. We just smile and nod, because our concerns are different. Our concerns deal with life and death. Who will take care of our child at school? Who will help count carbohydrates or deliver insulin? Who will know how to correct a high blood sugar? Who will know what to do if blood sugar is low? Who is going to keep my child alive and safe during the day? As a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes, I know these fears all too well. As a teacher, I was shocked with how little I knew. In the years preceding my daughters diabetes diagnosis, I had a few children with type 1 in my classroom. I was given the sheet with all the faces on itthe one depicting typical low and high blood sugar symptoms. I was told to send the children to the clinic if they experienced any of these symptoms. And that was it. I clearly remember sitting in my daughters hospital room during our week-long stay after her diagnosis and thinking, Oh my goodness. I didnt know. Anything could have happened. No one ever told me that type 1 was life-threatening. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Special Needs Factsheet

Diabetes Special Needs Factsheet

Diabetes affects how the body uses glucose. Glucose comes from the foods we eat and is the main source of energy for the body's cells. Glucose levels in the blood are controlled by a hormone called insulin. Insulin is made by the pancreas and helps glucose enter the cells. Type 1: the pancreas doesn't make enough insulin. Kids and teens who have type 1 diabetes must take insulin as part of their treatment. Insulin is the only medicine that can control their blood sugar levels. Type 2: the pancreas makes insulin, but the body cannot respond to it properly (this is called insulin resistance). Most people who develop type 2 diabetes are overweight, since extra body fat causes insulin resistance. Most people with type 2 diabetes do not need to take insulin, but may take a pill to help control blood sugar. Having too much or too little sugar in the blood makes a person feel sick. Blood sugars can be checked with a blood glucose monitoring system. People with diabetes must check their blood sugar levels regularly throughout the day. Diabetes can be managed through medicine, diet, and exercise. need to go to the school nurse and monitor blood sugar levels several times a day need to take insulin or wear an insulin pump need to drink from a water bottle in class and use the bathroom frequently need to eat lunch and snacks at a certain time, and eat snacks in class have symptoms of high or low blood sugar. Low blood sugar symptoms include hunger, shakiness, dizziness, headache, irritability, and confusion. High blood sugar symptoms include thirst, frequent urination, nausea or vomiting, rapid breathing, fruity breath, and confusion. Because bullies often target students who seem "different," certain health conditions, including diabetes, can put kids and teens at higher risk of Continue reading >>

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