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What Supplements Are Good For Prediabetes?

3 Simple Natural Remedies To Reverse Prediabetes Right Away

3 Simple Natural Remedies To Reverse Prediabetes Right Away

Statistics show that 70-80 million Americans--that’s anywhere from three to sixteen percent of the general population, in both the United States and Canada, are insulin resistant. You may hear your doctor refer to this condition as “impaired fasting glucose” or IFG. This is just another term for insulin resistance or Pre-diabetes. You are diagnosed as pre-diabetic when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not necessarily raised enough to refer to you as “diabetic.” However, Pre-diabetes is your body alerting you to hidden dangers, since those diagnosed with the condition are more prone to becoming Type 2 Diabetics as well as candidates for heart attacks and strokes. Luckily, there are three natural treatments to reverse pre-diabetes effectively. Pre-diabetes Means Your Liver Is Fat Pre-diabetes is insulin resistance, which in a nutshell means that you are dealing with a fatty liver. Put simply, insulin resistance or, fatty liver, occurs when the pancreas becomes so overburdened due to the liver not being able to do its job, and because the liver is also overburdened. Is Pre-Diabetes An Epidemic? If you’d call fifty percent of the U.S. population diabetic, according to a study released on the prevalence of Diabetes in the U.S. by JAMA, then yes, diabetes is certainly an epidemic. Advertisement What confuses most people about a pre-diabetes diagnosis is that you don’t have to be overweight or obese to be diagnosed with the condition. In fact, you can be stick-thin, but as long as you’re eating a high processed food and high protein diet that includes dairy, you are a candidate for the condition. This is due to the fact that high protein diets contain fat, no matter what type of animal protein you’re eating, and is a major contributor to th Continue reading >>

Garlic For Pre Diabetes Diet Cholesterol Support

Garlic For Pre Diabetes Diet Cholesterol Support

Garlic a positive addition to the pre-diabetes diet for cholesterol support. A meta-analysis was just published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (January 2012). The study was conducted in an attempt to determine the efficacy of garlic supplementation for assisting in the support of cholesterol. People are commonly looking for natural ways to manage increased lipid and cholesterol levels, especially if they have type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes metabolic syndrome. Garlic supplementation is a natural approach that has been advocated. The authors looked at the various studies on the subject to see what they say about the influence of garlic on serum lipid levels. This meta-analysis included 26 studies and found that overall garlic was superior to a placebo in reducing total serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels. They found that the effects of garlic supplementation was more significant in people that had taken it for a longer period of time and had higher total cholesterol levels to begin with. The researchers looked at the effect of garlic extract, garlic powder, and garlic oil. It appears that garlic powder and garlic extract were more effective in reducing total cholesterol levels. Garlic oil was more effective in reducing serum triglyceride levels. All lipid parameters were not lowered. Garlic did not demonstrate an effect on low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and total cholesterol/HDL ratio was not observed. The authors concluded that garlic supplementation could be used to reduce triglyceride and total cholesterol levels. People with diabetes and prediabetes metabolic syndrome are especially predisposed to dyslipidemia (poor cholesterol-lipid levels) and resultant cardiovascular disease. Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes? The Consequences Of “natural Alternatives”

Cinnamon For Diabetes? The Consequences Of “natural Alternatives”

A customer strolled up to the counter one night when I was working in a retail pharmacy: “My doctor says I have prediabetes. I don’t want to take any drugs. Do you have something natural I can use to cut my blood sugar?” I looked at him in the eye, and pointed at his sizeable midsection. “Sir, if you’re at risk for diabetes, and you don’t want to take medication, the single best thing you can do for yourself is lose some weight.” He grinned and asked, “Great – what supplement can I take to help me?” This type of discussion occurs all the time. A patient has been assessed by their physician, and informed that they have a medical problem of some sort. The patient, reluctant to accept the physician’s evaluation, heads to the pharmacy for a second opinion. In some cases, the patient may question the physician’s advice: “All my physician wants to do is prescribe drugs.” Yet there’s a disconnect when it comes to strategies for management. More often than not, non-drug approaches are rejected out-of-hand (probably because the sample I speak with have already made the decision to buy something). And in those that are leery of medical management, there’s often a willingness to consider anything that’s available without a prescription – particularly if it’s perceived as “natural.” Natural products are gentle, safe, and effective, while medicine is thought of as unnatural, harsh, and potentially dangerous. This is the appeal to nature fallacy, nothing more. Purveyors of supplements leverage the appeal to nature fallacy into the marketing strategy of choice for almost all supplements and “alternative” medicines. And it leads to bad health care decisions. Alternative medicine for diabetes is big business, because the public health burden Continue reading >>

12 Simple Ways To Fight Prediabetes

12 Simple Ways To Fight Prediabetes

At 28, Jennyvi Dizon wasn't expecting to be turned down for health insurance. "I thought I was fairly healthy," she says. The company disapproved her because she weighed 188 pounds and was 5 feet 3 inches tall. They wanted her to weigh 155 pounds or less. When she reapplied one month later, the insurer requested blood tests. This time, the news was even more startling: her blood glucose (blood sugar) level was above normal and her cholesterol was high. Jennyvi's mother has diabetes, so the elevated blood glucose reading was especially worrisome. Online, Jennyvi learned that her test level meant she had prediabetes—a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes and also increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. "I had been in a little bit of denial because, really, I was overweight and unhealthy, but I didn't realize it," says Jennyvi, a bridal and evening gown designer from Phoenix. "I knew that if I get to the diabetes level, it'll cause me problems later." The hidden condition As many as 60 million people in the United States have prediabetes, yet more than 90 percent of them don’t know it. People with prediabetes usually have no symptoms, and many who learn about their prediabetes think it’s no big deal. "People do not take this as seriously as they need to," says Ann Albright, PhD, RD, director of the Division of Diabetes Translation at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. "The good news is there is something you can do about it," Dr. Albright adds. The best way to fight prediabetes and get your blood sugar back in the normal range is with a coordinated plan of healthy nutrition, increased physical activity and lifestyle coping strategies that support modest weight loss if you are overweight. (Modest weight loss is defined as losing 5 t Continue reading >>

How To Stop Pre-diabetes From Progressing Into Full-blown Diabetes

How To Stop Pre-diabetes From Progressing Into Full-blown Diabetes

Pre-diabetes affects an estimated 79 million people in the U.S. Sadly, almost all of them will go on to develop the full-blown disease within 5 years.1 Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when an individual has a fasting blood sugar level between 110-120 mg/dl on three consecutive blood tests. Lifestyle changes can go a long way to prevent this from progressing into full-blown diabetes; however, dieting and exercise alone are not always enough. So what else can be done? Well, new research shows that increasing your magnesium intake could actually make a significant difference. Magnesium Halts the Development of Diabetes Emerging scientific evidence suggests that a higher magnesium intake may reduce the incidence of diabetes. Researchers from Soochow University examined the association between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes by conducting a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.2 The researchers combined the results of 13 prospective cohort studies involving 536,318 participants where they discovered thousands of cases that detected a significant link between higher magnesium intake and a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. This association was not substantially modified by geographic region, follow-up length, sex, or family history of type 2 diabetes. Also, it seems that an increase in magnesium intake produces further drops in diabetes risk. For every 100 mg/day increase of magnesium, the risk of diabetes drops significantly. The authors concluded that their research provides further evidence supporting a link between higher magnesium intake and a lower risk of diabetes. Diabetes-Halting Foods that are Rich in Magnesium So how do you get more magnesium in your system? Well, the first thing to do is start eating foods that are rich in magnesium. The following table Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Helpful Supplements For Blood Sugar

Helpful Supplements For Blood Sugar

People with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes often lack adequate levels of many vitamins and minerals, a consequence of poor eating habits. Supplements correct these deficiencies and help restore normal metabolic activity. They also complement a healthy diet and exercise. Here are 6 supplements for blood sugar to help fight these deficiences: silymarin, chromium, resveratrol, alpha-lipoic acid, vitamin D, and magnesium. A perfect storm is brewing, nutritionally—and it could easily sweep you away. One of every three Americans has some form of prediabetes (often undiagnosed), and 25 million have full-blown type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese are the primary risk factors, although family history, inactivity, race, and age also can contribute. Eating whole foods and avoiding junk foods and sugary drinks can help. Ditto for muscle-building resistance exercises. People with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes often lack adequate levels of many vitamins and minerals, a consequence of poor eating habits. Supplements correct these deficiencies and help restore normal metabolic activity. They also complement a healthy diet and exercise. And there’s a bonus: When you control your blood sugar, hunger jags decrease and weight loss becomes easier. Lower doses of these nutrients can help with prediabetes, higher doses with type 2 diabetes. If you take more than one of them, opt for lower doses. Silymarin. Three studies have proven this antioxidant extract of milk thistle (Silybum marianum) can lower fasting and post-meal blood sugar levels and reduce excess insulin. A longer-term indicator—HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin) levels, which provide an average blood sugar level over six weeks—declined significantly, too. In one of the studies, people taking silymarin also lost about 8 pe Continue reading >>

Reverse Prediabetes With Better Eating Habits And Supplements

Reverse Prediabetes With Better Eating Habits And Supplements

(NewsTarget) The biggest epidemic in America hasn't come from birds, Asia, or germs. It's caused by the food you put in your mouth, and it has already affected some 70 to 100 million American adults. Doctors refer to the condition as metabolic syndrome, Syndrome X, or insulin-resistance syndrome - or, increasingly, prediabetes. If you have it and don't do anything about it, you'll be on the fast track to full-blown diabetes and a constellation of other health problems. "You can diagnose the telltale sign - a pot belly - all by yourself, standing in front of a mirror," says Fred Pescatore, M.D., a nutritionally oriented physician in New York City. "The bigger your belly, the worse off you probably are." In addition to abdominal obesity, the other key signs of prediabetes are high blood pressure, high levels of triglyceride (a type of blood fat), low levels of the "good" high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and high levels of either blood sugar or insulin. High insulin levels point to insulin resistance, a characteristic of glucose intolerance, which hamstrings the body's ability to properly use the hormone to burn sugars and carbohydrates. Consider the case of Richard, a high-powered East Coast business executive. In December 2005, he was 50 pounds overweight, his blood pressure was inching up, and his blood fats were skyrocketing. Richard (whose name we've changed) turned to Pescatore, who coached him on better eating habits and recommended several nutritional supplements. Six months later, Richard had lost 40 pounds, and his blood fats and blood pressure were normal. "Most of the signs and symptoms of metabolic syndrome will correct themselves just with changes in the diet," says Pescatore. He ought to know. Pescatore was a chubby Italian kid before he realized Continue reading >>

You Can Reverse Pre-diabetes! Here’s How

You Can Reverse Pre-diabetes! Here’s How

What’s the biggest epidemic in America? It’s pre-diabetes, or metabolic syndrome. Pre-diabetes is a result of our largely inactive lifestyle and the way most of us eat. And if we don’t do something about it, we’re likely to develop full-blown diabetesResearch has shown, however, there is much you can do now to reverse pre-diabetes and ward off diabetes. Most people with pre-diabetes do not have symptoms. But some do note subtle symptoms of fatigue and brain fog. Normal blood sugar levels are 70-100 mg/dl after a fasting glucose test. With pre-diabetes, the level is 100-125 mg/dl. (Above 125 mg/dl is considered diabetic.) Sometimes, people with pre-diabetes have normal blood sugar levels but high insulin levels, at least initially. So, in addition to having your fasting blood sugar levels, it’s a good idea to have your insulin levels checked, especially if you’ve had apparent episodes of low blood sugar. Pre-diabetes is a reversible condition. But to get it under control, you need to work on it from several fronts. Here are the three best things you can do if you’ve had blood sugar levels in the pre-diabetes range. You should see results in three months or less. 1. Exercise. Sustained low-to-moderate aerobic exercise is best. Find things you can work up to doing for about 45 minutes, six days a week, at 40-55% of your maximum target heart rate. Walking, swimming and biking are good choices. Exercise actually reduces insulin resistance in muscle cells and lowers blood sugar levels. Plus, it will help you to lose weight and keep it off. 2. Cut back on sugar and refined carbohydrates. Most people do better sticking with an anti-inflammatory, Mediterranean-type diet. That means reasonable-size portions, lots of vegetables, salads, and fresh, broiled fish, fruit Continue reading >>

Best Vitamins For Diabetics

Best Vitamins For Diabetics

Eating a varied diet rich in natural sources of vitamins is a good idea for diabetics. Nutritional support is critical for diabetics because diabetes tends to drain nutrients. When levels of glucose are high in the blood, the body tries to ‘wash’ the excess sugar out. This is why diabetics need to use the washroom frequently. Unfortunately, diabetics also lose nutrients via their urine. Research studies show that diabetics are repeatedly found to be deficient in important water-soluble vitamins and minerals. What’s more, the loss of these vitamins worsens the body’s ability to manage blood sugar, creating a vicious cycle. Combining a healthy diabetes diet plan and a daily exercise routine with the best vitamin supplements for diabetics goes a long way in achieving stable blood sugar levels. What Vitamins Are Diabetics Deficient In? The term vitamin is short for “Vital Amino Acid”. This means that these are vital for the proper functioning of hundreds of chemical processes in the body which the body cannot manage by itself. Proper blood sugar control is one such function for which vitamins are critical. There are 13 essential vitamins that the human body requires and they must be obtained from an external source — through food and/or supplements. Diabetics need two kinds of vitamins: Water Soluble – Vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, C, Biotin, and Folate are water-soluble and cannot be stored in the body for longer periods of time. Diabetics are often deficient in these vitamins since they pass greater amounts of urine daily. As their body tries to get rid of extra sugar, diabetics lose more water-soluble vitamins than most others. That’s why diabetics need to to get these vitamins daily in doses larger than what normal people need. Luckily, you can get all Continue reading >>

Chronic Neuroimmune Diseases

Chronic Neuroimmune Diseases

Melissa Kaplan's Information on CFS, FM, MCS, Lyme Disease, Thyroid, and more... The Prediabetic Epidemic Syndrome X is a relatively new diagnosis, but it is a condition as old as the typical American diet. Jack Chellem, Nutrition Science News, March 2001 The person with a "fat tire" carries an unmistakable clue to his health right around the waist: He either has or is at serious risk of developing Syndrome X. The condition isn't a household word quite yet, but it's getting there. An estimated 60 to 70 million Americans-about one of every four people-have some degree of Syndrome X, which sets the stage for adult-onset diabetes and coronary artery disease. The good news is that, like many other health problems, Syndrome X can be prevented and reversed through a combination of diet, supplementation, and moderate physical activity. The term Syndrome X was coined in 1988 by a Stanford University endocrinologist, although the cluster of signs and symptoms that distinguish it had previously been referred to as metabolic syndrome or insulin-resistance syndrome. Originally, Syndrome X was defined by four characteristics: (1) abdominal obesity, (2) elevated levels of triglycerides and low levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL, or the "good" cholesterol), (3) hypertension, and (4) insulin resistance. Insulin resistance, the hallmark of adult-onset diabetes, also lies at the core of Syndrome X. This hormone imbalance alters blood-fat ratios, raises blood pressure, and increases fat storage. In the past 13 years, several other signs and symptoms have been associated with Syndrome X: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol oxidized by free radicals, low levels of antioxidant vitamins, elevated C-reactive protein (C-RP, a marker of inflammation),1 low dehydroepiandrosterone (DHE Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Nutritional Supplementation

The Importance Of Nutritional Supplementation

Author's Perspective: Nutritional supplementation is important but only if you eat healthy meals and if you use whole-food based supplements. Taking supplements in lieu of eating healthy foods just doesn't work. There's a reason why they're called "supplements" ... Most of us are aware that vitamins, minerals, herbs, and other nutrients are critical to our health. But, most of us are not aware that many of those supplements sold in grocery stores, drugstores, health-food stores, and on the Internet are synthetic and have very little nutritional value. When you think of a "vitamin", what picture pops into your head? For most of us, we picture a pill -- because we've been conditioned by television to believe that "vitamins" come in pills. For example: One-A-Day, Centrum. But, these colored tablets are nothing more than compressed rocks containing synthetic minerals, additives, and fillers. So, should we avoid taking supplements? Yes, if you're going to take synthetic supplements. No, if you're going to take whole food-based supplements. And, since more than 60% of the U.S. population takes some form of a nutritional supplement and more than 65% have some type of illness, it would suggest that some nutritional supplements are not working. So, if you choose to use nutritional supplements, it's important to recognize the key criteria to look for when purchasing a quality supplement -- so that you can reap the benefits of supplements without risking your health and wasting your money. So, you should stop wasting your money on the supplements you're currently buying. Most people believe the supplements they're taking are okay, but 97% of our clients are shocked to discover that they were wasting their hard-earned money on chemicals packaged as vitamins! You basically have 2 ch Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance & Prediabetes:

Insulin Resistance & Prediabetes:

Visit our Health Index for More Subjects, Conditions and Answers Insulin Resistance or "Pre-Diabetes" Also Called "Metabolic Syndrome" Just tell me what to take The human body developed on this planet over the past 2 million years. During all but the last 8,000 of those years (and 8,000 years when you are talking of an evolutionary time frame is but the blink of an eye), the human body evolved eating meat, fat and high fiber vegetables, with some roots and tubers. Eight thousand years ago the "agricultural revolution" took place, with man learning how to domesticate grain. Virtually overnight, man became dependant upon carbohydrates as the main source of food. Archeologists point to that exact time period that the average height of man drops by two inches and all of the degenerative diseases we have today became prevalent in the society of that time. With today's accepted high carbohydrate diet it is projected that by the year 2025 there will be over 300 million diabetics planet wide. It is just not the diet our bodies evolved with. What is insulin resistance? Carbohydrates are simply long chains of sugar molecules hooked end-to-end. When a person eats carbohydrates their normal digestive process breaks up these chains into the individual sugar molecules, and they pass right through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream, and load up the bloodstream with sugar. If this happened every once in a while it would not be a problem. But as diets today are so high in carbohydrates, people have a constant high level of sugar pouring into their bloodstream year after year. This requires their body to continuously produce high levels of insulin to keep that sugar level down. (Insulin’s job is to push sugar out of the bloodstream into the cells where it is used for energy.) Eve Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 2

Diabetes, Type 2

What is type 2 diabetes? Also called adult-onset diabetes, type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder resulting from the body’s inability to properly use or ultimately make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate sugar, starches and other foods the body uses for energy. It is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. Type 2 diabetes is nearing epidemic proportions in the United States as a result of a greater prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. The upswing is also due to the increasing number of older people in the population. What are the symptoms? Many symptoms of diabetes such as excessive thirst or irritability, can seem unimportant, which is one of the reasons why the disease often goes undiagnosed. However, early detection is very important because it can reduce the odds of developing the dangerous complications of diabetes. Common symptoms include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Increased fatigue Irritability Blurry vision If high blood sugar levels are not brought under control via treatment type 2 diabetes (and type 1 diabetes as well) can lead to a number of serious complications: Eye damage: People with diabetes have a 40 percent higher than normal risk of developing glaucoma, increased pressure within the eye that can lead to vision loss. They are also 60 percent more likely than normal to develop cataracts, which cloud the lens of the eye, blocking light and blurring vision. They are also at risk of diabetic retinopathy, damage to the retina that is the leading cause of impaired vision in the United States. High blood pressure: This disorder occurs at twice the normal rate among diabetics. Heart disease: Deaths from heart disease among diabetics are two to four Continue reading >>

Be Proactive In Diabetes Prevention! Supplements For Good Health

Be Proactive In Diabetes Prevention! Supplements For Good Health

Prediabetes Health: Must-Have Supplements at The PreD Store As we said earlier, in order to perform all the basic tasks needed for daily functioning, you need nutrients. That’s where supplements come in! Supplements can help prevent deficiencies and illnesses by delivering the nutrients and minerals your body needs to stay healthy. People with prediabetes—the condition that develops before type 2 diabetes—are especially in need of nutritional insurance: Prediabetics may be deficient in certain nutrients including vitamin D, also known as the “sunshine vitamin,” a fat-soluble vitamin that encourages the absorption and metabolism of calcium and phosphorous and helps regulate the immune system. It’s also important for prediabetics to shore up their levels of chromium, potassium, zinc and magnesium, as deficiencies in these nutrients can worsen carbohydrate (glucose) intolerance, studies say. Taking supplements will ensure you get the extra nutritional insurance your body needs to function properly and stave off the development of diabetes. To make it easier to get all the nutrients you need, we created a line of supplements designed specifically for people with prediabetes. Featuring multivitamins, such as PreD Foundation and PreD Cardio Health, as well as single vitamins, such as PreD Vitamin D and PreD Omega 3, these nutraceuticals can supply you with essential vitamins and minerals that can’t be obtained through diet alone. Check out PreDiabetes Essentials in our new online store, The PreD Store, plus shop for cooking and food prep tools, fitness equipment and more! Continue reading >>

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