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What Should My Numbers Be For Gestational Diabetes

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

Between 32 - 36 weeks are what we know to be the toughest time for gestational diabetes. It's at around this point that we typically see insulin resistance worsen. You think you have your gestational diabetes diet sussed out and you can literally wake and eat the same breakfast you've been tolerating well for weeks on end and get crazy blood sugar levels?! What the heck is going on and what did you do wrong???... Firstly, you've done NOTHING wrong! This is to be expected and is completely normal and typical with gestational diabetes. To understand what's going on, we need to understand a bit about gestational diabetes and how it works... Gestational diabetes is a progressive condition Gestational diabetes typically presents itself between 24 - 28 weeks. It is for this reason that it is around this time where screening for gestational diabetes typically takes place. It should be noted that insulin resistance can be detected much earlier than this time also, especially in subsequent pregnancies where the mother previously had gestational diabetes. Many ladies are told that earlier diagnosis means that they may have undiagnosed Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. We have found that this is not the case when ladies are tested following the birth of their baby and so we advise not panicking and waiting until you have your post birth diabetes testing before causing yourself too much distress. Further information on post birth diabetes testing can be found here. Gestational diabetes is caused by increased hormones levels from the placenta that cause insulin resistance. Those diagnosed with gestational diabetes are not able to increase insulin production to meet the additional requirement, or they cannot use the insulin which has been made effectively and so blood sugar levels remain to Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Fetal Monitoring, Gestational Diabetes, Integrative Medicine, Pregnancy and Birth, Weight Management What is self blood glucose monitoring? Once you are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes, you and your health care providers will want to know more about your day-to-day blood sugar levels. It is important to know how your exercise habits and eating patterns affect your blood sugars. Also, as your pregnancy progresses, the placenta will release more of the hormones that work against insulin. Testing your blood sugar level at important times during the day will help determine if proper diet and weight gain have kept blood sugar levels normal or if extra insulin is needed to help keep the fetus protected. Self blood glucose monitoring is done by using a special device to obtain a drop of your blood and test it for your blood sugar level. Your doctor or other health care provider will explain the procedure to you. Make sure that you are shown how to do the testing before attempting it on your own. Some items you may use to monitor your blood sugar levels are: Lancet–a disposable, sharp needle-like sticker for pricking the finger to obtain a drop of blood. Lancet device–a springloaded finger sticking device. Test strip–a chemically treated strip to which a drop of blood is applied. Color chart–a chart used to compare against the color on the test strip for blood sugar level. Glucose meter–a device which “reads” the test strip and gives you a digital number value. Your health care provider can advise you where to obtain the self-monitoring equipment in your area. You may want to inquire if any places rent or loan glucose meters, since it is likely you won't be needing it after your baby is born. How often and when should I test? You may need to test your blo Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High blood sugar levels are where your blood sugar levels go over YOUR test target. So that is anything 0.1mmol/l over your target e.g. if your target is 7.8mmol and you get 7.9mmol/l, this is classed as an over target reading or high blood sugar level. Bearing in mind that test targets vary all over the UK and Ireland, what is classed as a high reading for one person, maybe still within target levels for someone else. What to do if you get high blood sugar levels Re-test your blood sugar levels Re-wash your hands in JUST water and re-test your blood sugar levels. It is very easy to touch something, even your face or hair and contaminate our hands before testing. Many soaps and sanitisers can have ingredients which leave residue on the skin which can give false high readings and so it is important to wash hands in just water before re-testing. If levels are still high Record all the results so that your diabetes team can review them and what you ate so that you can review what may have caused the spike in your blood sugar levels. Drink plenty of water and walk or be as active as possible for 20 mins or longer. Drinking water helps to flush excess sugars from the body and exercise has an insulin type effect on the body. Communicate with your team Each diabetes team may give different recommendations as to when to contact them, but the general guidance given and also what we recommend is to contact your team after 3 over target readings within a week. Don't wait until your next scheduled appointment if you're getting over target readings, give your team a call to discuss it with them. Some teams will ask you to come in earlier to start medication or insulin, others may fax a prescription through to your GP surgery or Pharmacy for you to collect and start. Other teams may Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes does not increase the risk of birth defects or the risk that the baby will be diabetic at birth. Also called gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), this type of diabetes affects between 3% and 20% of pregnant women. It presents with a rise in blood glucose (sugar) levels toward the end of the 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy. In 90% if cases, it disappears after the birth, but the mother is at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. Cause It occurs when cells become resistant to the action of insulin, which is naturally caused during pregnancy by the hormones of the placenta. In some women, the pancreas is not able to secrete enough insulin to counterbalance the effect of these hormones, causing hyperglycemia, then diabetes. Symptoms Pregnant women generally have no apparent diabetes symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms occur: Unusual fatigue Excessive thirst Increase in the volume and frequency of urination Headaches Importance of screening These symptoms can go undetected because they are very common in pregnant women. Women at risk Several factors increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes: Being over 35 years of age Being overweight Family members with type 2 diabetes Having previously given birth to a baby weighing more than 4 kg (9 lb) Gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Belonging to a high-risk ethnic group (Aboriginal, Latin American, Asian or African) Having had abnormally high blood glucose (sugar) levels in the past, whether a diagnosis of glucose intolerance or prediabetes Regular use of a corticosteroid medication Suffering from ancanthosis nigricans, a discoloration of the skin, often darkened patches on the neck or under the arms Screening The Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Gui Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

1 / 10 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy With a Gestational Diabetes Diet Pregnancy already comes with a long list of things that you should and shouldn’t do to achieve the best outcomes for you and your baby. But if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes (diabetes that develops during pregnancy), then you need to learn some more dos and don’ts to keep your blood sugar under control and make sure that diabetes doesn’t harm your pregnancy. You will need to learn about a gestational diabetes diet — foods and lifestyle habits that help stabilize your blood sugar — as well as, possibly, gestational diabetes treatment. This may include diabetes medications your doctor prescribes during pregnancy to keep your blood glucose under control. It is possible to have a healthy pregnancy with gestational diabetes, but you must take care of yourself to reduce your risk of the following: An overly large baby Cesarean delivery (C-section) Miscarriage Preeclampsia (pregnancy-related high blood pressure) Preterm delivery Stillbirth Other poor health outcomes for your baby Long-term health effects for you Controlling your blood glucose is important for everyone, young and old. But for pregnant women, good blood sugar control is important before, during, and after pregnancy to reduce the chance of diabetes complications. According to the Mayo Clinic, good blood sugar control during pregnancy can help prevent or reduce these risks: Prevent complications for the baby Prevent complications for the mother Reduce the risk of birth defects Reduce the risk of excess fetal growth Reduce the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth Reduce the risk of premature birth To keep blood glucose under control during pregnancy, it’s important to check your blood sugar level frequently. If you are Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Whether you had diabetes before you got pregnant or you developed diabetes during your pregnancy, you'll need to keep a close eye on your blood sugar levels. Tight control will help you avoid complications and long-term health problems for both you and your baby. You're eating differently because your body needs more energy to help your baby grow and be healthy. And your changing hormones affect how your body makes and uses insulin. In the later parts of your pregnancy, you may become more insulin resistant, so blood sugar builds up to higher levels. How often should you check your blood sugar? Pre-existing diabetes: Before and after meals and before bedtime If you are pregnant and have type 1 diabetes, your doctor might sometimes ask you to check your blood sugar in the middle of the night, around 3 a.m. You should check your fasting urine ketones every day, too. For every type of diabetes, if you're pregant you need to see your doctor at least once a month, perhaps as often as once a week. Continue reading >>

7 Techniques To Reduce Post-meal Spikes During Pregnancy

7 Techniques To Reduce Post-meal Spikes During Pregnancy

“Gary, I think I need more insulin at breakfast.” “Why do you say that, Julianne?” “Because I’m always having high readings right afterwards, and my obstetrician said I shouldn’t spike after I eat.” “And what happens after the spike?” “It usually comes down to normal before lunch. So do you think I should take more insulin?” After-meal blood sugar spikes can create quite a quandary for anyone with diabetes, particularly during pregnancy. Research has shown that fetal macrosomia (overgrowth of the baby) becomes more common when post-meal blood sugars exceed 120 mg/dl (6.7 mmol). With post-meal readings above 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol), the risk more than doubles from baseline. Fetal macrosomia can cause many problems during pregnancy. When the baby grows and develops too rapidly, it can lead to a premature and more complicated birth. It may also cause injuries to occur to the baby during delivery. Why do after-meal blood sugars have such a major influence on the baby’s growth? Nobody knows for certain. Perhaps, when the mother’s blood sugar “spikes” suddenly after meals, the baby is fed more sugar than its pancreas can “cover” with insulin, and high fetal blood sugar results. And because the baby’s kidneys spill almost all excess sugar from the baby’s bloodstream back into the amniotic fluid, the baby then drinks in the extra glucose and winds up growing more than it should. Suffice to say that post-meal blood sugar spikes are something to avoid during pregnancy. But how do we do it? Getting back to Julianne’s question, if she takes more insulin, she’ll probably wind up hypoglycemic before lunch. Luckily, we have some excellent techniques for preventing the after-meal highs without having to take more mealtime insulin. What Causes Sp Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Troubleshooting High Readings

Gestational Diabetes: Troubleshooting High Readings

Copyright © 1998 [email protected] All rights reserved. DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. Consult your health provider. This particular web section is designed to help present some ideas for coping with/preventing higher readings. It should be re-emphasized that nothing herein should be considered medical advice. Contents What to Do If You Get a High Reading: Figuring Possible Causes What If You Just Have a High Reading, Without Any Real Rhyme or Reason? What Then? What If My Fasting Numbers Are Somewhat High? Is There Anything I Can Do To Help? What If My Post-Meal Numbers Are Somewhat High? Is There Anything I Can Do To Help? Trouble-Shooting High Readings: Some Ideas What To Do If You Get a High Reading: Figuring Possible Causes What do you do if you get a higher reading than you are supposed to? First off, don't panic. There are any number of factors that can cause an incorrectly high reading, and you need to rule these out before confirming the high reading. Always re-test to confirm a high number! You need to know if there was an error of some kind. The very first thing you do if you get a high number is to go wash your hands thoroughly and then re-test. Any bits of food on your fingers can significantly affect your numbers. A residue of juice or a drop of fruit pulp on your hand could elevate your readings tremendously. Other substances on your hands might also possibly affect your readings, so washing your hands really well before doing a reading is very, very important. (Kmom's story: I had a couple of readings that were high; upon reflection I realized that I had been cutting up grapes for my toddler before the measurement and gotten busy and forgotten to wash my hands before testing. Wh Continue reading >>

Help! I’ve Got Gestational Diabetes And My Blood Glucose Readings Are High

Help! I’ve Got Gestational Diabetes And My Blood Glucose Readings Are High

You are here: Articles > Help! I’ve got gestational diabetes and my blood glucose readings are high What is gestational diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the amount of glucose in the blood is too high. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. It is diagnosed following a 2 hour Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) at around 26 to 28 weeks of pregnancy. This is a blood test ordered by your GP, obstetrician or antenatal clinic. This is considered a ‘universal test’, which means all pregnant women should have this test. What happens if my blood glucose levels stay too high in pregnancy? If high blood glucose levels (BGLs) are not treated, you and your baby may experience a number of problems. Women with poorly controlled BGLs are at much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus after pregnancy. This risk increases when women do not follow a healthy lifestyle during and after pregnancy or are unable to lose their pregnancy weight. A woman with GDM can have a baby that has an unhealthy growth pattern before it is born. Glucose crosses the placenta into your baby’s bloodstream. If your BGLs are high, your baby will receive high amounts of glucose. A baby’s insulin still works well meaning, even in utero, it is able to store this extra glucose and will grow faster and fatter. This means the growing baby can be at risk of: being a very large baby being born early being distressed during birth, and/or having low blood glucose levels at birth. Babies born to mums who have not had good blood glucose level management are also more likely to be overweight or obese into their adult lives, and have diabetes themselves. What do I do if I have a high BGL reading? If you have a high BGL it is important to work out why Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Having A Problem Keeping My Glucose Down.

I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Having A Problem Keeping My Glucose Down.

I had gestational diabetes with both of my pregancies. I know it isn't easy but you definetly need to watch what you eat and exercise. I was not put on insulin this last pregnancy I was put on a pill that I took in the morning before I ate and ended up having to take one at night to. The doctors main concern is when you have the baby, they could have problems with their sugar. My daughter came out and ended up her sugar dropped and she couldn't come out of the nursery until it was stable. With both of my pregnancies I wasn't able to see my baby until 24 hrs. My son ended up having fluid on his lungs, and my daughter had issues with her sugar. Try your best on watching what you eat and try and exercise. Another issue is the babies weight. My son was 10 lbs 6 oz, my daughter was only 8lbs 10oz. Not trying to worry you but big babies can happen especailly with gestational diabetes. Good Luck. I have Type 1 Diabetes, I am 23 weeks pregnant and I don't know if anyone has told you this...but the pancreas makes insulin and it is a hormone that you need to keep your blood sugar normal. When you are pregnant your body requires more insulin to preform the body functions. The amount of insulin you need changes up until you are about 36 weeks pregnant and then it just evens out again. They have no idea why but it just happens. I don't know if it is the same way for Gestational Diabetes, but i just thought you might want to know this information if it is the same. But you also should know that any white breads will raise your sugar and same with sweat things. Not to mention that salty foods can actually make you feel like you are having a high blood sugar but it is just the need to drink a ton more water. Because of the diabetes you will need like twice as much water as you would if Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Those Who Had It - Circle Of Moms

Gestational Diabetes Those Who Had It - Circle Of Moms

All Communities > Welcome to Circle of Moms!! > gestational diabetes those who had it Sonia - posted on 09/12/2011 ( 96 moms have responded ) I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 26 weeks and there are times that I have some high numbers. I am concerned that I am affecting the baby as far as development. The ultrasound has said breathing is fine and baby is not to big. Those who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are your kids healthy? Did you have high numbers sometimes? This is my second pregnancy with GD. I asked the Doctor at what point does the sugars start to affect (development wise) my baby. It isn't until you are over 200 that it will start having long term effects on the baby, including running the risk of the baby having diabetes when he/she is born. Anything under 200 will not have lasting effects on the kiddo, however they do want you to try and stay under that 120, because constantly having higher numbers can effect other things like your kidneys and liver. It can also help increase the risk of your placenta deteriorating early (a risk for anyone with GD even with sugars under control) It you have an occasional high sugar 120-140, they will just have you look at what you ate, if you start having them more consistently they will want to change your medication. if you are on a pill form, toward the end of your pregnancy, you may get switched to insulin, as the bigger the placenta the more it interferes with the liver's production of insulin. weird fact: just because you have GD this preggo, does not mean you will have it next preggo. I was on Glyburide from the first trimester on both pregnancies. (They can raise your dose up to 20mg a day, if you need more you will switch to insulin) One my first pregnancy, I switched to Insulin for the last Continue reading >>

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

What To Expect With Gestational Diabetes

Blood glucose control is key to having a healthy baby A diagnosis of gestational diabetes can cast a shadow over the joys of pregnancy. While the vast majority of these cases end with a healthy baby and mom, gestational diabetes (high blood glucose during pregnancy in a woman who has never had type 1 or type 2 diabetes) does increase risks to the health of both baby and mother. Keeping blood glucose under control is crucial for women with gestational diabetes to help safeguard their babies and themselves. Gestational diabetes is caused by issues that arise as part of a normal pregnancy: hormonal changes and weight gain. Women whose bodies can't compensate for these changes by producing enough of the hormone insulin, which ushers glucose from the blood into cells to produce energy, develop high blood glucose and gestational diabetes. Overweight mothers are at a greater risk for the condition. In the United States, gestational diabetes is reported in somewhere between 2 and 10 percent of pregnancies, but it is now believed that the condition affects 18 percent of women in pregnancy. The larger number is the result of new criteria for diagnosis, not just skyrocketing rates. The American Diabetes Association began recommending this year that gestational diabetes be diagnosed with only one abnormal test result rather than two, the previous method, and this is causing more cases to be detected. Gestational diabetes usually appears roughly halfway through pregnancy, as the placenta puts out large amounts of "anti-insulin" hormones. Women without known diabetes should be screened for gestational diabetes 24 to 28 weeks into their pregnancies. (If high blood glucose levels are detected earlier in pregnancy, the mother-to-be may actually have type 2 diabetes, rather than gestati Continue reading >>

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