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What Should My Blood Sugar Be On Metformin

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

Stopping Metformin: When Is It Ok?

The most common medication worldwide for treating diabetes is metformin (Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage, Fortamet). It can help control high blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s available in tablet form or a clear liquid you take by mouth before meals. Metformin doesn’t treat the underlying cause of diabetes. It treats the symptoms of diabetes by lowering blood sugar. It also increases the use of glucose in peripheral muscles and the liver. Metformin also helps with other things in addition to improving blood sugar. These include: lowering lipids, resulting in a decrease in blood triglyceride levels decreasing “bad” cholesterol, or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) increasing “good” cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) If you’re taking metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it may be possible to stop. Instead, you may be able to manage your condition by making certain lifestyle changes, like losing weight and getting more exercise. Read on to learn more about metformin and whether or not it’s possible to stop taking it. However, before you stop taking metformin consult your doctor to ensure this is the right step to take in managing your diabetes. Before you start taking metformin, your doctor will want to discuss your medical history. You won’t be able to take this medication if you have a history of any of the following: alcohol abuse liver disease kidney issues certain heart problems If you are currently taking metformin, you may have encountered some side effects. If you’ve just started treatment with this drug, it’s important to know some of the side effects you may encounter. Most common side effects The most common side effects are digestive issues and may include: diarrhea vomiting nausea heartburn abdominal cramps Continue reading >>

Metastudy Confirms Metformin Appropriate Treatment For Prediabetes

Metastudy Confirms Metformin Appropriate Treatment For Prediabetes

A study that reviewed several previous studies about the impact of using metformin on the progression of prediabetes to diabetes confirms that yes, people with prediabtes who take metformin end up with better blood sugars after 3 years than those who don't and are therefore less likely to be diagnosed with full-blown diabetes. This isn't original research, it's just a look at the major studies that have examined the impact of metformin on prediabetes. But because I hear from so many people with prediabetes whose doctors won't give them any help at all, I though it worth a look. Treating prediabetes with metformin: Systematic review and meta-analysis Muriel Lilly, Can Fam Physician Vol. 55, No. 4, April 2009, pp.363 - 369 The key issue to remember here is that the concept that "prediabetes" progresses to "diabetes" which treats the two conditions as if they were separate diseases is flawed. In fact, the medical definition of "diabetes" is completely arbitrary. A committee years ago chose some blood sugar test results and defined them as "diabetes." They could have--and many argue should have--chosen different test result numbers. But they chose the ones they did mainly, their own documentation showed, to diagnose people with diabetes as late as possible, because of the severe penalties the American medical system imposes on people who have pre-existing conditions. You can read about how the diagnostic standards for diabetes were set HERE. "Prediabetes" was also defined arbitrarily at the same time as "diabetes" was defined and as has been the case with diabetes, the definition has changed over the years. But what you, the person with abnormal blood sugar, need to understand is that there's no sudden change in your health that happens when you get an official diabetes dia Continue reading >>

Glucophage (metformin) And Diabetes

Glucophage (metformin) And Diabetes

Tweet Glucophage and Metformin are often mentioned in relation to diabetes treatment. But what exactly is Glucophage and how does Glucophage help control type 2 diabetes? The following guide to Glucophage should help you to understand more about this medication, its side effects and its value. What is Glucophage? Glucophage tablets (and Glucophage SR tablets) each have an active ingredient called Metformin hydrochloride. Metformin is widely used to aid in the control of blood glucose levels amongst people with type 2 diabetes. How does Glucophage help people with type 2 diabetes? Amongst people with type 2 diabetes, the pancreas fails to produce sufficient levels of insulin. Furthermore, the cells in the body may be resistant to any insulin that is present. Normally, insulin would instruct cells to remove sugar from the blood, but in people with diabetes blood sugar levels can climb too high. As we said before, Glucophage contains the ingredient Metformin. Metformin (Metformin hydrochloride) is a type of medicine known as a biguanide. This works to lower the amount of sugar in the blood of people with diabetes. It does this by lowering the amount of sugar produced in the liver, and also increasing the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. The cells are therefore more able to remove sugar from the blood. Metformin also slows the absorption of sugars from the intestines. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels between and after meals. Who is Glucophage prescribed to? Glucophage is usually prescribed as a treatment for people with type 2 diabetes who are overweight or obese. When diet and exercise fail to adequately control blood glucose levels, Glucophage is prescribed. Sometimes, this medicine is used in conjunction with other anti-diabetic medication. How often do people Continue reading >>

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Photography by Mike Watson Images/Thinkstock There are many type 2 medications, and each drug class works in the body in a different way. Here’s a quick guide to help you understand how long each drug will generally take to work: These short-acting oral medications, taken with meals, block the breakdown of complex sugars into simple sugars in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. “Simple sugars are more easily absorbed and cause the blood sugar to ultimately go up,” Sam Ellis, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Colorado says. These drugs are minimally absorbed into the blood, so a certain blood level concentration is not necessary for them to work. You will see the effect immediately with the first dose. “You take it before a meal, and with that meal you see the effect,” says George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. While researchers aren’t exactly sure how these oral medications work, it’s likely that the meds block some absorption of glucose in the GI tract. “You’ll see most of the effect in the first week with these drugs,” says Ellis. alogliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin These drugs work to block the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of a specific gut hormone that helps the body produce more insulin when blood glucose is high and reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver. Take a DPP-4 inhibitor (they come in pill form) and it’ll work pretty fast—you’ll see the full effect in about a week. “It’s blocking that enzyme after the first dose a little bit, but by the time you get out to dose five, you’re blocking the majority of that enzyme,” Ellis says. albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide, exe Continue reading >>

Metformin But Normal Blood Sugar?

Metformin But Normal Blood Sugar?

Ive been taking a break from TTC for a couple of months beacuse I was just becoming a little obsessive with the whole thing(by a little I mean super super crazy;) Anyway, I recently saw my OB again and after running all my hormone blood work again and doing another ultrasound, she said all my blood work was normal and my Ultrasoud also looked fine. But, why the long/irregular/annovulatory cycles?? Recently theyve been anywhere from 40-70(!!) days! Ive been temping and my temps are so erratic and dont indicate ovulation, even though I gear up to ovualte(based on CM) many times. Soooo, my OB wanted me to start 500mg of metformin 2x/day for some time then possibly start on clomid. She said even though my bloodowork and U/s was normal she wants to treat it as PCOS..? Now, my question is, my bloodwork for blood sugar was done and was completely normal. Has anyone else taken metformin for irregular cycles? Did it work? How about metformin + clomid? Im just looking for anyone thats been though the same and has more experience! Theres no reason( on blood tests anyway) for the irregular cycles and Im not sure about just taking metformin with no high blood sugar levels. Obviously, something is causing the cycles to be crazy, just dont know what it is:( Oh, and Ive never been on BC. you probably have PCOS and metformin is the most common prescription for it! Thats what I got prescribed! PCOS is polycystic ovary disease, and it commonly causes irregular cycles (i usually have one every 6 months, and the one Im on now has lasted 3 weeks now.) and difficult conceiving. It has other symptoms such as issues with weight, mood swings, craving for sweets and carbs, unusual hair growth or hair loss, along with many other things. It is a very difficult disease, especially if you want a fam Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Managing diabetes is one part investigation and two parts action. Unlike some other diseases that rely primarily on professional medical treatment, diabetes treatment requires active participation by the person who has it. Monitoring your blood sugar level on a regular basis and analyzing the results is believed by many to be a crucial part of the treatment equation. When someone is first diagnosed with diabetes, he is usually given a blood sugar meter (or told to go buy one) and told how and when to use it, as well as what numbers to shoot for. However, the advice a person receives on when to monitor and what the results should be generally depend on his type of diabetes, age, and state of overall health. It can also depend on a health-care provider’s philosophy of care and which set of diabetes care guidelines he follows. At least three major health organizations have published slightly different recommendations regarding goals for blood sugar levels. There is some common ground when it comes to blood sugar monitoring practices. For example, most people take a fasting reading before breakfast every morning. Some people also monitor before lunch, dinner, and bedtime; some monitor after each meal; and some monitor both before and after all meals. However, when monitoring after meals, some people do it two hours after the first bite of the meal, while others prefer to check one hour after the start of a meal. To help sort out the whys and when of monitoring, three diabetes experts weigh in with their opinions. While they don’t agree on all the details, they do agree on one thing: Regular monitoring is critical in diabetes care. Why monitor? Self-monitoring is an integral part of diabetes management because it puts you in charge. Regardless of how you manage your diab Continue reading >>

Metformin | Diabetesnet.com

Metformin | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:57 -- Richard Morris Two drugs from the biguanide class, metformin and phenformin, were developed in 1957. Unfortunately, phenformin reached the U.S. market first and resulted in several deaths from lactic acidosis. When this risk surfaced, phenformin was pulled from drugstore shelves worldwide. Metformin was eventually found to be 20 times less likely to cause lactic acidosis, but it was tainted by the history of its cousin. Metformin first became available in France in 1979 and has been widely used in Europe since then, but it was not cleared for use in Type 2 diabetes in the U.S. until 1994. Target Organ: Liver, secondary effects on muscle and fat. Action: Lower glucose production by liver, increase number of insulin receptors Side Effects: bloating, fullness, nausea, cramping, diarrhea, vit B12 deficiency, headache, metallic taste, agitation, lactic acidosis Contraindications: DKA, alcoholism, binge drinking, kidney or liver disease, congestive heart failure, pregnancy, use of contrast media, surgery, heart attack, age > 80 Metformin is a chemical kin to the French lilac plant, which was noted in the early 1900’s to lower the blood sugar. However, French lilac, like phenformin, turned out to be too toxic for use in humans. Metformin, with a much shorter action time than phenformin, has a much lower risk for severe side effects and is quite safe for use by anyone who is otherwise healthy. In fact, in the major UKPDS study, it was the only drug that reduced diabetes-related death rates, heart attacks, and strokes. It should not be used by those who use more than two ounces or two drinks of alcohol a day, who have congestive heart failure, or who have significant kidney, liver, or lung disease. Metformin lowers fasting blood glucose levels by an Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Do I Have To Monitor My Blood Glucose Levels If I Am On Metformin?

Do I Have To Monitor My Blood Glucose Levels If I Am On Metformin?

Do I have to monitor my blood glucose levels if I am on metformin? Not everyone agrees with me on this, but I very strongly feel that everyone with diabetes should be checking their blood sugar. Diabetes is a progressive disease, it will get worse on its own, even when you do everything right. I dont believe in giving diabetes any foothold, handhold, or toehold in your body; and as such, the meter is the first line of defense to see change for the worst when it starts to happen. The meter is the sentinel in the watch tower. Now many people feel that diabetics who take oral meds with little to no risk of low blood sugar, like your metformin, dont need to be testing blood sugar because there is nothing the patient can do if they find they are high. Again, I disagree, and this time because the fact that there is nothing you can do is false. First and foremost you can look at what you did to get yourself high in the first place and avoid doing it again. Testing before and several hours after various meals will help you learn what foods your body can tolerate and which ones it cant. If you numbers are always depressingly high, no matter what you eat, then your therapy needs adjusting. Continue reading >>

New Information On How Metformin Works

New Information On How Metformin Works

Not only has new research told us how metformin really works, but a new biomarker was found that can determine the optimal dose of metformin that should be used to get the best results for each patient. Research from the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center reveals that the drug most commonly used in Type 2 diabetics who don’t need insulin works on a much more basic level than once thought, treating persistently elevated blood sugar — the hallmark of Type 2 diabetes — by regulating the genes that control its production. investigators say they have zeroed in on a specific segment of a protein called CBP made by the genetic switches involved in overproduction of glucose by the liver that could present new targets for drug therapy of the disease. In healthy people, the liver produces glucose during fasting to maintain normal levels of cell energy production. After people eat, the pancreas releases insulin, the hormone responsible for glucose absorption. Once insulin is released, the liver should turn down or turn off its glucose production, but in people with Type 2 diabetes, the liver fails to sense insulin and continues to make glucose. The condition, known as insulin resistance, is caused by a glitch in the communication between liver and pancreas. Metformin, introduced as frontline therapy for uncomplicated Type 2 diabetes in the 1950s, up until now was believed to work by making the liver more sensitive to insulin. The Hopkins study shows, however, that metformin bypasses the stumbling block in communication and works directly in the liver cells. Senior investigator, Fred Wondisford, M.D., who heads the metabolism division at Hopkins Children’s, tells us that, "Rather than an interpreter of insulin-liver communication, metformin takes over as the messenger itself Continue reading >>

Nhs Direct Doctor Says... No Testing When Taking Metformin

Nhs Direct Doctor Says... No Testing When Taking Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community NHS Direct doctor says... NO testing when taking Metformin Sorry for the length of this, it is all relevent... I felt paticularly unwell the other day, and having gone without food for over 12 hours I tested my blood. My mmol/L was 12.0, which is high (for me). I was preparing my lunch at the time and wondered if I should still eat my main meal with this high reading, or not? My thinking being - if my reading is already high then eating could raise it even more. So, before cooking, I thought I'd ring "111" and ask their opinion (as it was a Bank Holiday and my options were limited). I talked with a very nice lady on the phone. She checked with her superior and came back to me to say it was OK to still eat it. She said a doctor would call me back within the next couple of hours, but if I felt worse to ring 111 again. Sometime later, after having cooked and eaten, I got a call from another lady saying the doctor was busy but would still call me back at some point. No problem I thought. When the doctor eventually did call me he asked some routine questions but then launched into a lecture on blood testing! He insisted I SHOULD NOT BE TESTING at all, as I was on Metformin. According to him, nobody on Metformin should be testing as it interferes with doing so (?!). I tried to explain I have always tested once a day, originally on my G.P.s instruction (and whilst taking Metformin). I told him the doctor stopped issuing test strips about a year ago (), however I have been buying them to continue testing myself (normally only once a day). I also pointed out to him if I didn't test my blood HOW was I supposed to know whether my diabetes was "under control" or Continue reading >>

What Should My Blood Sugar Be?

What Should My Blood Sugar Be?

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

I Take Metformin 500 Three Times A Day, Yet My Blood Sugar Is High?

I Take Metformin 500 Three Times A Day, Yet My Blood Sugar Is High?

Q: I take metformin 500 three times a day, and I eat less carbs and I exercise, yet my blood sugar levels remain high—up to 171 this morning. I'm sorry to hear that your blood glucose levels remain elevated despite taking metformin, watching your carbs, and exercising. Are you getting enough high-quality sleep on a regular basis? Inadequate sleep can cause high blood sugar readings in the morning even in people who eat right, exercise, and take medication as directed. Your elevated fasting blood blood sugar may also be due to the Dawn Phenomenon, in which increased production of growth hormone and other hormones overnight cause your liver to release stored sugar. Sometimes having a small protein snack—like a handful of nuts or a hard-boiled egg—before bed can help lower morning blood sugar. In fact, some people find that adding some carbs, like a half cup of berries, to the protein snack actually helps bring down their morning blood sugar even more. However, this is very individual, so it's a good idea to experiment with different snacks and amounts of food to see how your own blood sugar responds. Finally, consistency with diet, exercise, and medication is important, and it may take some time for blood sugar to normalize. If the measures above and keeping carb intake down, speak with your endocrinologist or other diabetes specialist. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. Disclaimer The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for, and dLife does not provide, professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatm Continue reading >>

Metformin: Are You Taking This Common Type 2 Medication? Here’s What You Need To Know

Metformin: Are You Taking This Common Type 2 Medication? Here’s What You Need To Know

For the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, most of the time, the first course of treatment is to try and control it with diet and exercise. However, if your blood sugar levels are still high despite these lifestyle changes, your doctor may recommend starting you on Metformin. Here is what you should know. What Is Metformin? Metformin is prescribed to patients with Type 2 diabetes, mainly to those patients who are insulin resistant and overweight. Metformin is an oral medication that is manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company. It was approved in 1994, by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Metformin is under the class of diabetes drugs known as biguanide and is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza and Riomet. Glucophage is dispensed as an immediate-release tablet, while Fortamet, Glucophage XR and Glumetza are released as extended-release tablets and Riomet is dispensed as an oral solution. Metformin is prescribed in doses of 500 milligrams, 850 milligrams and 1,000 milligrams, with 500 milligrams being the most common dosage. Metformin may be used in conjunction with diet and exercise or it may be used with other diabetes medications, like Competact or Janumet. What Else is Metformin Used For? Besides Type 2 diabetes, Metformin is also to treat other conditions as well, including Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), obesity, Insulin Resistance Syndrome and female infertility. How Does Metformin Work? Metformin works in three ways. First, it stops glucose from forming in your liver. Second, it reduces the amount of sugar that your intestines absorb. Third, it improves your body’s insulin sensitivity. I advise reading the following articles: What is Metformin FDA Black Box Warning? The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has placed a Continue reading >>

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