diabetestalk.net

What Should Blood Sugar Be Before Bed Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes Questions!

Gestational Diabetes Questions!

I just have some questions and I don't want to wait until Tuesday, when I see my dietician again, to ask. If the questions are repetitive in any way I apologize, but I'm a bit scattered brained by all of this. I want to do the right things right out of the gate, and not wait around. 1) Do I time my snacks and next meals based on the time that I finish the snack/meal, or at the beginning? So lets say I start breakfast at 8:30 and finish at 8:45....do I eat my snack at 10:30 or 10:45? 2) Am I allowed to eat something in between snacks and lunch if they won't affect my blood sugar? A small piece of chicken, or some veggies for example? 3) The recommended carb servings on my meal plan...are these what I NEED to eat, or is it just my maximum limit? Can I eat NO carbs if I choose to? 4) If I don't eat my limit of carbs during a meal, can I apply the extra to a different meal or snack? 5) Should my bedtime snack be 2 hours after dinner or right before I lay down to go to sleep? 6) (kind of like #5) Based on my breakfast today, I am expecting to eat dinner around 4:25-4:35. That's fairly early for me. Do I have a snack 2 hours after dinner and then a bedtime snack right before bed? I don't normally go to bed until about 11pm or so. Ooh, I really wish I was at home, so I type this normally, instead of on my phone, lol. 1. I do all my timing from the end of my meal. Also, my window is eat every 2-3 hours, so it's not a rigid time window. 2. Cucumbers and radishes are pretty much free to eat whenever. I end up eating 4 oz of cukes and hour before lunch because I'm starving and it doesn't affect my sugar. 3. You need to eat carbs. Carbs are important and if you skip them, it can actually raise your score. Plus, you might get light-headed, like I do. 4. I've tried it, it doesn't wo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Introduction Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that affects women during pregnancy. Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose (sugar) in the blood. Normally, the amount of glucose in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin. However, during pregnancy, some women have higher than normal levels of glucose in their blood and their body cannot produce enough insulin to transport it all into the cells. This means that the level of glucose in the blood rises. Types of diabetes Gestational diabetes is diabetes first diagnosed during pregnancy. The two other main types of diabetes are: type 1 diabetes – when the body produces no insulin at all (often referred to as juvenile diabetes or early-onset diabetes) type 2 diabetes – when the body doesn't produce enough insulin and/or the body’s cells do not react to insulin (insulin resistance) See the relevant links above for women who already had diabetes before they became pregnant. Gestational diabetes can be controlled with diet and exercise. However, some women with gestational diabetes will need medication to control blood glucose levels. Read more about how gestational diabetes is treated. If gestational diabetes is not detected and controlled, it can increase the risk of birth complications, such as babies being large for their gestational age (Macrosomia). Read about the complications of gestational diabetes for more information about the risks of this and related conditions. In most cases, gestational diabetes develops in the third trimester (after 28 weeks) and usually disappears after the baby is born. However, women who develop gestational diabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Symptoms Gestational diabetes is often diagnosed during routine screening. It Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Today, with improved health care, women with diabetes can expect to deliver a healthy baby. If you have your diabetes in good control before you get pregnant, and take special care of your diabetes during pregnancy, you have a much better chance of having a healthy baby. You also lower your risk of getting other health problems from diabetes while you are pregnant. Getting Pregnant If you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and have it in good control, you have the same chance as other women to get pregnant. But when you have diabetes, you and your partner have other things to consider. It is important to plan for your pregnancy. Both your health and your baby’s health depend on good planning. Steps you must take include a healthy diet, exercise, and very careful control of your blood glucose (sugar). The most important step is to see your doctor early. If possible, see your doctor before you get pregnant. For more information about diabetes, see the UPMC patient education sheets Diabetes: Basic Facts and Diabetes: Your Management Plan. Close Control of Diabetes Close control of your blood glucose is very important before you become pregnant and during the first several weeks that you are pregnant. A1c (A-one-C) levels should be as near to normal as possible (6 %). Close control during these times may lower the risk of birth defects and miscarriage. Most women with diabetes can have a normal, healthy pregnancy when the blood glucose goals are met. Check with your doctor what your specific blood glucose goals are for fasting and after meals. While you are pregnant, your body’s need for insulin changes. To control your diabetes, you and your doctor may need to make constant adjustments. You will need to work closely with your diabetes health care team. Gestational Diabetes Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

One of the topics that comes up a lot in the email I get from visitors to my What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes web site is the question of when is the best time to test your blood sugar. A lot of doctors still tell people with Type 2 to test first thing in the morning and before meals. That was what I was told at diagnosis in 1998. People who test using this schedule may tell you their blood sugar is usually 120 mg/dl, which sounds pretty good, except that since this is a fasting number it usually hides the information that the person's blood sugar maybe going to 250 mg/dl or higher after every meal. Research has shown that for people with Type 2 diabetes--especially those who have been diagnosed recently and still retain some beta cell function--it is the high spikes after meals that contribute most heavily to raising the A1c and causing complications. If you only test your fasting blood sugar, you will not know anything about how high your blood sugar is spiking after meals, so you won't know which foods are toxic to you because they cause dangerous spikes. If you are like most people with Type 2 your access to the very expensive blood sugar testing strips is limited. You may have to pay for strips yourself or your insurance may pay for a single box each month. That means that you need to use each strip as efficiently as possible. Here are some strategies that you can use to get the information out of your blood tests that will let you drop your A1c back into the healthy zone. Keep a written log that matches what you eat with the test result you get. Even though your meter may keep a list of your readings, these readings are meaningless unless you know what food you ate that resulted in each particular reading. If you write down what portion size of which food y Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

As a specialist in gestational diabetes nutrition, I get a lot of questions about blood sugar and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is controversial. It’s complicated. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there. I do my best to address the controversies in interviews and with participants in my online gestational diabetes course, but since I’ve been receiving more and more inquiries in my inbox from fellow healthcare professionals, I wanted to dispel some gestational diabetes myths head-on right here on the blog. I’ll also be attending some midwifery conferences this year (including one this weekend), and I figured this resource would be a helpful place to refer practitioners if they have questions. Given the medical interventions that are commonly pushed on women with gestational diabetes (believe me, I’m also disheartened by the over-medicalization of pregnancy and birth), it’s important to understand the science behind high blood sugar and pregnancy. My goal is to help moms and practitioners make better decisions – based on fact, not fear – so they can have the healthiest pregnancy possible. 9 Gestational Diabetes Myths Myth #1: Blood Sugar Levels are Naturally Higher In Pregnancy There’s a lot of misinformation floating around about blood sugar levels in pregnancy. Some think that gestational diabetes is a “diagnosis looking for a disease.” In other words, they believe that blood sugar levels naturally go up during pregnancy, so there’s nothing to worry about. Some practitioners don’t even test for gestational diabetes and just tell their patients to “eat healthy” under the assumption that any rise in blood sugar is just a normal phenomenon of pregnancy. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Research has looked at blood sugar levels in nor Continue reading >>

Why You Need A Bedtime Snack

Why You Need A Bedtime Snack

Close your kitchen at 7 pm! Brush your teeth after dinner, so you don’t eat anything the rest of the night! I hear these ‘weight loss tricks’ time and time again. And, not even just from clients or readers. I read them in magazines and I’ve seen them in weight loss books. And I have a couple of questions about them. So, nothing goes into your mouth after this magical, made up time? And what does that even mean – do you put caution tape around your kitchen? Put sticky notes all over the fridge calling yourself a fat cow if you open it? Does the minty flavor REALLY curb your appetite? What kind of toothpaste are you using to stay that minty all night? Really, I want to know what kind of toothpaste you use. All of this, of course, is to avoid eating before bed. And I get it – binging on nachos before hitting the hay probably isn’t a super great idea if you’re trying to lose weight (or ever), but seriously, can we just stop with the bedtime snack police? If you’re hungry – if you have actual hunger pangs – you need to eat. Always. I don’t care who you are, what your goals are – starving yourself is a metabolic disaster and will only cause more harm than good. Steady blood sugar is so important for weight loss, fat burning, energy, a high functioning metabolism, curbing cravings and just overall health. As you can imagine, your blood sugar drops steadily throughout the night because you are fasting. So, not eating from dinner to breakfast – which could be at least 12 hours – is going to cause your blood sugar to bottom out overnight. Starving yourself after dinner is honestly such old news. The newest research shows that including a small bedtime snack won’t sabotage your weight loss efforts, and as a matter of fact, it may even help them. Wro Continue reading >>

Sleep Hacks To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Sleep Hacks To Lower Your Blood Sugar

As a diabetic, you probably already know how important it is to eat right, exercise, and take your meds. Here’s something you may not know about controlling blood sugar: Sleep plays a vital role in maintaining normal blood sugar levels. Get less than six hours on most nights and you're three times more likely to have elevated blood sugar levels, according to research published in the Annals of Epidemiology. Even just one sleepless night can interfere with your body's ability to use insulin (and therefore regulate glucose), according to Dutch researchers. Too little sleep also leads to more weight gain: In a national survey of 87,000 people, one-third of participants who slept less than six hours were obese. And when researchers at Columbia University analyzed 20 years' worth of data on more than 68,000 women, they found that those who got five hours or less weighed about five pounds more and were 15% more likely to become obese than those who slept seven hours. Most adults need between seven and nine hours a night, yet one in five Americans regularly sleeps less than six hours, and nearly 70% of women report frequent sleep troubles, according to national polls. The best strategy to improve sleep, according to experts: Hit the sack and set your morning alarm for the same time every day (even on weekends)—maintaining a consistent sleep schedule keeps your biological clock in sync so you rest better. Here are 9 more tips to help you sleep well and stay healthy: Skip afternoon coffee breaks The caffeine from your favorite latte can stay in your system for about eight hours; even if you can fall asleep, you may not be resting soundly. Alcohol has the same effect: Though sipping a glass or two of red wine may make you drowsy, a few hours later, the alcohol levels in your Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational diabetes, which causes higher-than-normal blood sugar levels to be present, occurs during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes testing usually occurs between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have risk factors for diabetes, your doctor may recommend testing earlier in the pregnancy. If you receive a gestational diabetes diagnosis, you’ll need testing 6 to 12 weeks after giving birth to see whether the diabetes is still present. Gestational diabetes usually resolves after you deliver, although you’re at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, gestational diabetes affects 3 to 8 percent of pregnant women in the United States. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of having a large baby, which may cause problems with delivery. It also increases the risk of having a baby born with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Respiratory distress, jaundice, and low calcium and magnesium levels are also more common in babies whose mothers have gestational diabetes. There’s a higher risk of your baby developing diabetes later in life as well. Changing your diet is generally the first method of treatment for gestational diabetes. The amount of calories you should consume each day depends on a number of factors, such as your weight and activity level. Pregnant women should generally increase their calorie consumption by 300 calories per day from their prepregnancy diet. Doctors recommend three meals and two to three snacks per day. Eating smaller meals more frequently can help you keep your blood sugar levels stable. Your doctor will likely recommend that you monitor your blood sugar levels to help manage gestational diabetes. Testing your blood sugar after meals tells you how that meal affected your blood sugar. Your d Continue reading >>

Tag Archives: Normal Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

Tag Archives: Normal Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

Ever heard of gestational diabetes? It’s when a when a woman develops diabetes during pregnancy. It usually goes away soon after the baby is born. All pregnancies are characterized by some degree of insulin resistance and high insulin levels: they are necessary for the baby. Nevertheless, healthy pregnant women run blood sugars 20% lower than when they are not pregnant. In the U.S., gestational diabetes occurs in 5% of pregnancies, affecting more than 240,000 births annually. Compared to caucasians, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) occurs more often in blacks, native Americans, Asians, and Latinos. So What’s the Big Deal? Numerous problems are associated with GDM, for both the mother and the baby: dangerously high blood pressure (preeclampsia) excessive amount of amniotic fluid (the baby in the uterus floats in this fluid) delivery requiring an operation early or premature delivery death of the baby birth trauma, such as broken bones or nerve injury metabolic problems in the baby (low blood sugar, for example) abnormally large baby (macrosomia, a major problem) Diabetic ketoacidosis—a life-threatening complication of diabetes—is rare in GDM. How Is GDM Diagnosed? (section updated December 28, 2013) Most women should undergo a screening test around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. Screen earlier if undiagnosed type 2 diabetes is suspected or if risk factors for diabetes are present. The American Diabetes Association (2014 guidelines) recommends either one of two screening tests. “One-step test.” It’s a morning oral glucose tolerance test after at least eight hours of fasting. Fasting blood sugar is tested then he woman drinks 75 grams oral of glucose. Blood sugar is tested again one and two hours later. This blood sample is obtained by a needle in a v Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

It’s 3 Am. Do You Know What Your Blood Glucose Is?

It’s 3 Am. Do You Know What Your Blood Glucose Is?

The other night, I woke up at 1:20 AM, 10 minutes before my alarm was scheduled to go off. I’d set the alarm for 1:30 because, as I got ready for bed two hours earlier, I checked my blood glucose and got a reading of 79 mg/dl. Not too low and not dangerous. At least, not really. You see, earlier that night I had a pretty intense workout at the gym, and as I mentioned in last week’s entry (“What Causes Stress and Relieves It at the Same Time?”), I’m still not certain about when my “second lows” happen. I do know that I continue to burn more sugar than usual for several hours after I work out, and I knew that I needed to do something to bring my blood glucose up around 120 mg/dl, especially since, even on a nonexercise night, I wouldn’t intentionally fall asleep with a reading in the 70’s or 80’s. In fact, I fear any reading lower than the century mark at bedtime. So after drinking a glass of skim milk (12 grams of carbohydrate) mixed with a scoop of some powdered Slim-Fast (18 g/c), I regained confidence in my ability to avoid “nocturnal hypoglycemia.” But, just in case, I set my alarm for 1:30 so that I could wake up and check again, to make sure I wouldn’t go low. And, as I said, I woke up at 1:20, which is when I should have checked my blood glucose. Instead, I rolled over, turned off the alarm, and then pretty quickly the warm comforter overpowered my good intentions and sucked me back in. I did that thing, that stupid thing, where, half-awake, I lay in bed but could’ve sworn I was down in the kitchen going through the motions with the test kit. Ahh, the dream-imagined blood glucose reading! I can’t remember the numbers I created for that reading, but what I did—going back to sleep without checking—was stupid. When I know I need to c Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Fetal Monitoring, Gestational Diabetes, Integrative Medicine, Pregnancy and Birth, Weight Management What is self blood glucose monitoring? Once you are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes, you and your health care providers will want to know more about your day-to-day blood sugar levels. It is important to know how your exercise habits and eating patterns affect your blood sugars. Also, as your pregnancy progresses, the placenta will release more of the hormones that work against insulin. Testing your blood sugar level at important times during the day will help determine if proper diet and weight gain have kept blood sugar levels normal or if extra insulin is needed to help keep the fetus protected. Self blood glucose monitoring is done by using a special device to obtain a drop of your blood and test it for your blood sugar level. Your doctor or other health care provider will explain the procedure to you. Make sure that you are shown how to do the testing before attempting it on your own. Some items you may use to monitor your blood sugar levels are: Lancet–a disposable, sharp needle-like sticker for pricking the finger to obtain a drop of blood. Lancet device–a springloaded finger sticking device. Test strip–a chemically treated strip to which a drop of blood is applied. Color chart–a chart used to compare against the color on the test strip for blood sugar level. Glucose meter–a device which “reads” the test strip and gives you a digital number value. Your health care provider can advise you where to obtain the self-monitoring equipment in your area. You may want to inquire if any places rent or loan glucose meters, since it is likely you won't be needing it after your baby is born. How often and when should I test? You may need to test your blo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What do I need to know about diabetes and pregnancy? Plan your pregnancy so healthcare providers can help you have a healthy pregnancy and baby. Control your blood sugar levels before and during pregnancy to decrease your risk of health problems. Your healthcare provider may recommend A1c levels less than 6.5% before you get pregnant. During pregnancy, your A1c levels may need to be between 6 and 7%. How can I manage my diabetes during pregnancy? Check your blood sugar level. You may need to test your blood sugar level at least 3 times each day. Ask your healthcare providers when and how often you should check your blood sugar. He will tell you what your blood sugar levels should be at different times throughout the day. He may want your blood sugar levels to be 60 mg/dL to 99 mg/dL before meals, at bedtime, and during the night. He may want them to be 100 mg/dL to 129 mg/dL after meals. Your healthcare provider can show you how to use a blood glucose meter to check your levels. Ask about medicines. Some medicines are not safe to take when you are trying to get pregnant or become pregnant. If you have type 2 diabetes and you take diabetes pills, you may need to stop taking them and start using insulin. Insulin is safe to use during pregnancy. Check your blood pressure often. High blood pressure can cause problems with your health and your pregnancy. Blood pressure readings are usually written as 2 numbers. If you do not have high blood pressure before pregnancy, your systolic blood pressure (the first number) should be between 110 and 129. Your diastolic blood pressure (the second number) should be between 65 and 79. If you have high blood pressure before pregnancy, your systolic blood pressure should be between 120 and 160. Your diastolic blood p Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Levels In Pregnancy

How To Test Your Blood Sugar Levels In Pregnancy

Test Frequently In order to build a healthy plan for controlling gestational diabetes, the goal must be to keep your blood sugar levels in the normal range throughout the day. This must be priority #1. When we eat foods that are healthy and normal for our body, sugar is released slowly and converted into blood glucose in a manner that maintains normal blood sugar levels. Eating unhealthy foods such as highly processed foods that are full of sugar, creates a rapid release of glucose and results in a higher than normal blood sugar level. The first step in a healthy plan for controlling gestational diabetes is knowing what your blood sugar level is by testing at intervals throughout the day. Women with gestational diabetes should measure their blood glucose levels at least four times a day. You should include a fasting blood sugar and a blood sugar one or two hours after each meal. Your results should be recorded in a glucose log, along with dietary information about what foods you ate. The glucose log will help your physician decided if you should begin an ant-hyperglycemic medication along with your diabetic diet. Conversely, your physician may decrease the frequency of glucose monitoring if you are in good control with diet alone. Keeping blood glucose levels in a healthy range at all times requires eating a healthy meal every 3-4 hours, getting regular exercise and if necessary taking insulin or other glucose lowering (hypoglycemic) medications. Achieving a normal maternal blood glucose level decreases the chance of having pregnancy related complications such as preeclampsia, preterm labor, and delivery of a large baby. Recommended Glucose Monitoring Levels The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) both h Continue reading >>

The Surprising Link Between Your Sleep And Gestational Diabetes

The Surprising Link Between Your Sleep And Gestational Diabetes

© Mosuno / Stocksy United Quick Read Not sleeping enough may contribute to gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes, elevated blood sugar levels during pregnancy, carries significant risks for both moms and babies. A new study shows that pregnant women who sleep less are more likely to have gestational diabetes. Sleep in pregnancy is challenging. Good eating habits, exercise and avoiding screen time before bedtime can all help, as can making sleep a priority. Pregnancy is hard work—and it’s definitely not always comfortable. The hours are long, you may have heartburn and hemorrhoids and be sick to your stomach. Meanwhile—surprise!—you’re getting bigger everywhere you look, sometimes even your feet. Your body is flooded with hormones. Add that to your changing emotional landscape and it’s no wonder you’re having trouble sleeping. Unfortunately, the results of a recent study suggest that pregnant women who sleep less than 6 hours and 15 minutes a night are almost three times more likely to have gestational diabetes as those who sleep more. What is gestational diabetes? Even if you’re a healthy mom-to-be doing everything right, you can still develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Like diabetes itself, gestational diabetes is elevated levels of blood sugar, specifically during pregnancy, says Vishesh Kapur, M.D., M.P.H., founder of the Sleep Medicine Center at Harborview. When you’re pregnant, you are at the mercy of your hormones. Progesterone, a hormone produced by your placenta, helps make sure that baby gets all the nutrients needed to grow, says Katherine McLean, M.D., an obstetrician at Meridian Women’s Health at Ballard. But it also raises the possibility of elevated blood sugars in mom. Why is gestational diabetes bad for baby? If you h Continue reading >>

More in diabetes