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What Really Causes Diabetes

The Real Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes (and How To Cure It)

The Real Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes (and How To Cure It)

If you, or someone close to you has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you may be overwhelmed and confused by the information you’ve received. Chances are you’re struggling to deal with the changes in your health. But what you may not know is that type 2 diabetes is an entirely reversible condition. (1) By understanding the real causes of type 2 diabetes (and what to do about them) you’ll be able to take the guesswork out of regaining your health, and feel empowered to work towards overcoming type 2 diabetes for good. What Does It Really Mean to Have Type 2 Diabetes? If you’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it simply means that too much sugar is floating around in your bloodstream, to the point of being dangerous to your health. Under normal circumstances, your body automatically removes excess sugar from your bloodstream every time you eat. You see, the food you eat always undergoes a routine process: Once ingested, it’s broken down into sugar molecules in the bloodstream. As soon as your body senses that sugar has entered the bloodstream, it sends the hormone insulin to pull sugar molecules out of the bloodstream and into your cells to be used or stored as energy. This is a natural digestive process, intended to provide fuel for the body. However, type 2 diabetes is the result of this natural process being disrupted. When you have type 2 diabetes, it means your body has temporarily lost its ability to pull the sugar out of your bloodstream and into your cells, leaving you with elevated levels of sugar lingering in your blood. But why does this happen? The answer is simple. With an excessive amount of refined sugar in your diet, your body becomes resistant to dealing with it. It’s this exact mechanism that leads to insulin resistance, or type 2 diab Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. The notion is understandable. Blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, so a common idea has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. However, the major diabetes organizations take a different view. The American Diabetes Association1 and Diabetes UK2 have labelled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center,3 which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Here is what you need to know: Sugar Is the Body’s Fuel The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort glucose into the cells. What causes insulin resistance? It appears to be caused by an accumulation of microscopic fat particles within muscle and Continue reading >>

Causes Of Diabetes

Causes Of Diabetes

Tweet Diabetes causes vary depending on your genetic makeup, family history, ethnicity, health and environmental factors. There is no common diabetes cause that fits every type of diabetes. The reason there is no defined diabetes cause is because the causes of diabetes vary depending on the individual and the type. For instance; the causes of type 1 diabetes vary considerably from the causes of gestational diabetes. Similarly, the causes of type 2 diabetes are distinct from the causes of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune system destroying the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This causes diabetes by leaving the body without enough insulin to function normally. This is called an autoimmune reaction, or autoimmune cause, because the body is attacking itself. There is no specific diabetes causes, but the following triggers may be involved: Viral or bacterial infection Chemical toxins within food Unidentified component causing autoimmune reaction Underlying genetic disposition may also be a type 1 diabetes cause. Type 2 diabetes causes Type 2 diabetes causes are usually multifactorial - more than one diabetes cause is involved. Often, the most overwhelming factor is a family history of type 2 diabetes. This is the most likely type 2 diabetes cause. There are a variety of risk factors for type 2 diabetes, any or all of which increase the chances of developing the condition. These include: Living a sedentary lifestyle Increasing age Bad diet Other type 2 diabetes causes such as pregnancy or illness can be type 2 diabetes risk factors. Gestational diabetes causes The causes of diabetes in pregnancy also known as gestational diabetes remain unknown. However, there are a number of risk factors that increase the chances of deve Continue reading >>

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

Symptoms & Causes Of Diabetes

What are the symptoms of diabetes? Symptoms of diabetes include increased thirst and urination increased hunger fatigue blurred vision numbness or tingling in the feet or hands sores that do not heal unexplained weight loss Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can start quickly, in a matter of weeks. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly—over the course of several years—and can be so mild that you might not even notice them. Many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms. Some people do not find out they have the disease until they have diabetes-related health problems, such as blurred vision or heart trouble. What causes type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes occurs when your immune system, the body’s system for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Scientists think type 1 diabetes is caused by genes and environmental factors, such as viruses, that might trigger the disease. Studies such as TrialNet are working to pinpoint causes of type 1 diabetes and possible ways to prevent or slow the disease. What causes type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of diabetes—is caused by several factors, including lifestyle factors and genes. Overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity You are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes if you are not physically active and are overweight or obese. Extra weight sometimes causes insulin resistance and is common in people with type 2 diabetes. The location of body fat also makes a difference. Extra belly fat is linked to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and heart and blood vessel disease. To see if your weight puts you at risk for type 2 diabetes, check out these Body Mass Index (BMI) charts. Insulin resistance Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resista Continue reading >>

The Real Cause Of Diabetes

The Real Cause Of Diabetes

Put your seatbelt on for this one....... Is there anyone with pre diabetes or diabetes out there? Although pre diabetes and diabetes may sound like different conditions, the reality is, they are actually the same disease with the same risks. Yet, many people don’t take controlling their blood sugar seriously until they are actually diagnosed with diabetes. What causes diabetes? It's high blood sugar, isn't it? Actually, it’s not. Diabetes is a disease caused by excess insulin, not excess blood sugar. In other words, high blood sugar is a symptom, but not the root cause. Insulin is the hormone responsible for reducing blood sugar. In order for insulin to work, our tissues have to be sensitive to its action; otherwise, tissues become resistant and insulin struggles to clear out sugar from the blood. As insulin resistance sets in, the first organ to stop responding to insulin is the liver, followed by the muscles and eventually fat. How does insulin resistance begin? The root of the problem is our diet. After eating carbohydrates, the carbs break down into sugar, trigger the pancreas to produce insulin and are then stored in liver and muscles. However, there is a limit to the amount of sugar the liver and muscles can store. The easiest way to understand this is to think of your liver and muscles as small closets without much storage space. If sugar keeps coming in, the closet will quickly fill up. As a result, insulin escorts the excess sugar that cannot “fit” into the liver and muscles into fat cells, where it is converted into fat and stored. And since eating carbohydrates ultimately raises insulin levels, “carbavores” can count on having enough insulin for this process. But what happens when fat finally becomes resistant to insulin? For instance, what if a l Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes: Why Saturated Fats Are The Real Enemy

Diet And Diabetes: Why Saturated Fats Are The Real Enemy

Diet and Diabetes: Why Saturated Fats Are the Real Enemy This is the seventh article in our Controversies series and the third piece focusing on the subject of fats. Today, we are going to explore the very important relationship between saturated fat intake and the onset of diabetes. As we mentioned in The Ultimate Guide to Saturated Fats , Once we control for weight, alcohol, smoking, exercise and family history, the incidence of diabetes is significantly associated with the proportion of saturated fat in our blood. Today we will take a deep dive to fully understand why there is such a strong link between diabetes and saturated fat consumption. We will also discuss how a plant-based diet may protect you from (or even reverse!) the disease. Insulin resistance is a hallmark of both prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. So what is insulin resistance exactly (and why is it important)? Insulin is what permits glucose (sugar) in the blood to enter our (muscle) cells. In essence, insulin unlocks the door, allowing the glucose to come in. If there is no insulin at all (the case of type 1 diabetes), the blood sugar hangs out in the bloodstream because it cannot get inside. That causes the blood sugar levels to rise. But what happens if the insulin is there but is simply not working properly? In that case, the lock to the cell door is blocked. This is what is called insulin resistance. So what causes insulin resistance in the first place? Fat build-up inside (muscle) cells creates toxic fatty breakdown products and free radicals that block the insulin-signaling process, close the glucose gate, and make blood sugar levels rise. In fact, insulin resistance can occur in 180 short minutes (just 3 hours!) after the consumption of fat. The process of insulin resistance, caused by the buil Continue reading >>

You Did Not Eat Your Way To Diabetes!

You Did Not Eat Your Way To Diabetes!

Don't fall for the toxic myth that you caused your diabetes by reckless overeating. While people with Type 2 diabetes often are seriously overweight, there is accumulating evidence that their overweight is a symptom, not the cause of the process that leads to Type 2 Diabetes. Even so, it is likely that you've been told that you caused your diabetes by letting yourself get fat and that your response to this toxic myth is damaging your health. Blaming you for your condition causes guilt and hopelessness. Even worse, the belief that people with diabetes have brought their disease on themselves inclines doctors to give people with diabetes abysmal care. They assume that since you did nothing to prevent your disease, you won't make the effort to control it. So they ignore your high blood sugars until they have lasted long enough to cause complications and then they prescribe the newest, most expensive, potentially dangerous but heavily marketed drugs, though the drug-maker's own Prescribing Information makes it clear that these drugs cannot lower your blood sugar to the levels that reverse or prevent complications. The myth that diabetes is caused by overeating also hurts the one out of five people who are not overweight when they contract Type 2 Diabetes. Because doctors only think "Diabetes" when they see a patient who fits the stereotype--the grossly obese, inactive patient--they often neglect to check people of normal weight for blood sugar disorders even when they show up with classic symptoms of high blood sugar such as recurrent urinary tract infections or neuropathy. Where Did This Toxic Myth Come From? The way this myth originated is this: People with Type 2 Diabetes often are overweight. And manny people who are overweight have a syndrome called "insulin resistance Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did The Film What The Health Get Itright?

Professor of Cardiology, Summa cum Laude grad, Kahn Center for Longevity and GreenSpace Cafe. www.drjoelkahn.com @drjkahn. Author The Plant Based Solution NEW Sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes: Did the Film What the Health Get itRight? The documentary What the Health is receiving a huge amount of attention and most of it is positive. Many reports of people attempting to eat better are filling social media. I discussed the film on a local TV station in Detroit after two reporters indicated that the movie had made a big impact on their diets. There have even been reports that restaurants serving healthier fare have seen an uptick in customers attributing the change to the film. I have seen this in my own plant-based restaurant and have a What The Health Happy Hour that has been very popular. Naturally, there have been critics of the movie defending their viewpoint that meat based diets are healthy, but most have rallied around a statement in the film by Neal Barnard, MD that sugar does not cause diabetes. As the answer to this question may be important to you, I have done some research and share it here but this is in NO way an endorsement to add back soda and candy bars to your diet. In a world stressed by growing obesity and its medical consequences, limiting sugar is a universal recommendation from all health experts. 1) Type 1 diabetes is not caused by sugar. All agree on this as type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. However, patients with type 1 diabetes can develop and reverse insulin resistance (IR) in their muscles and liver so understanding the origin of IR is important. 2) Who is Neal Barnard, MD? Dr. Barnard is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and Continue reading >>

What Really Causes Type 2 Diabetes

What Really Causes Type 2 Diabetes

Contrary to popular belief, type 2 diabetes (a chronic disease) isnt caused by eating lots of sweets. Actually, the cause is still unknown, but there are certain factors that are known to increase a persons risk of developing this metabolic disorder. There are two main categories of risks that are associated with the development of type 2 diabetesthose that you can't change (uncontrollable), and those that you can (controllable). The more risk factors you have, the higher your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Our Best Articles, Delivered Get expert advice on Diabetes from our coaches and trainers Although these factors are out of your control, it is important to know whether you fall into any of these higher-risk categories. Your age. Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases as you get older. Diabetes most often affects people over age 40, and people over 65 are at even higher risk. It is recommended that people aged 45 and older be tested for diabetes every three years. Your family history. There is some evidence that diabetes runs in families. If your parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes, for example, your risk of developing diabetes increases. Your race. Certain ethnicitiesAfrican Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islander Americansare at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Your health history. Women who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are 50% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. Giving birth to a baby over nine pounds also increases a woman's risk. Other illnesses and conditions that are risk factors for type 2 diabetes include pre-diabetes and any condition that affects the ability of the pancreas to produce insulin, such as pancreatitis, PCOS (polycystic ovarian sy Continue reading >>

The Real Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes (and How To Prevent And Reverse It)

The Real Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes (and How To Prevent And Reverse It)

Do you have type 2 diabetes? If so, you’ve probably been told three “facts”: you have an incurable disease you need to be treated with medications to keep your blood sugar under control you need to avoid sugar and starch and eat more protein and fat Before we get into whether these facts are in fact true, let me pose a more general question: how is this theory of diabetes working out for us? Are we taking diabetics and improving their health outcomes? Or is the progression of diabetes an all but inevitable decline into worse and worse symptoms, more and more medication, and greater and greater impairment leading to an early death? The answer, clearly, is that diabetics who are treated by Western medicine get worse, not better, over time. What’s less obvious is that the treatments themselves contribute about as much to declining health as the diabetes itself. Once you’re diagnosed in the current system, you’re trapped in a place where there is no possibility of restored health, of improved function, of a cure. I’d like to offer a more hopeful and empowering path. Not disease management, but reversal. Not dependence on toxic pharmaceuticals, but independence from medicine interventions of any kind. If that sounds good, keep reading. Because we have to debunk those three “facts” if you’re going to get well. Myth #1: Type 2 diabetes is an uncurable disease This myth is half true. If you live in the Western world and consume a high fat, high protein Western diet, then it sort of makes sense to view type 2 diabetes as a disease that exists in your body. The problem is the hidden assumption that the only place it exists is in your body. That’s like saying you have a disease that causes frequent nosebleeds when what’s happening is you’ve joined a boxin Continue reading >>

Fat Is The Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

Fat Is The Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

ron: I’m glad you asked this question, because it gets at a common issue that many people share. Due to science education in schools and the way media reports on scientific news, the general public is under the impression that each new study sort of wipes out any study that came before. Say that yesterday there was a study or article in favor of say butter, then you would see those headlines and think that the latest and greatest WORD from science is that butter is healthy. And then tomorrow, when another study comes out showing that butter is indeed unhealthy, there is another headline and people think that the latest “word” is that butter is now unhealthy. Another problem is that because people think the latest study is the latest word and since studies are not all going to agree, people think that the science keeps flip flopping and get frustrated with that. The media makes this worse by only reporting studies that they can make appear to be a “flip flop” as the media makes money off of eye catching headlines. . But that’s not how science actually works. When done in good faith, science is about hitting a subject from a whole bunch of different angles and attempting to replicate results multiple times. Understanding that life is messy and it’s extremely difficult (impossible?) to create perfect studies for subjects as complex as nutrition on long term health, we *expect* that not all the studies will agree with each other. However, over time, if we do our job, we can also expect that the *body of scientific evidence* will paint a fairly clear picture. I say all the time, “It’s not about any one study. It’s about the body of evidence.” . Did you know that there are over 100 studies showing that smoking is either neutral or health-promoting? But t Continue reading >>

Here's What Really Causes Diabetes (and What Fixes It) - Www.dailymedicaldiscoveries.com

Here's What Really Causes Diabetes (and What Fixes It) - Www.dailymedicaldiscoveries.com

There are two basic requirements for getting diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common kind its often called adult onset diabetes. This update will be our guide since it contains some of the latest research into what really causes diabetes. As the authors say, the two requirements for getting diabetes are insulin resistance, and a breakdown of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. These two requirements shift the thinking on how diabetes develops. This study shows that the old model of diabetes is wrong. It used to be thought that diabetes was caused by continued insulin resistance. By eating too much sugar and carbohydrates, you require your liver to produce a huge amount of insulin all the time. High sugar and high carbohydrate foods are thought to cause so much insulin production, that eventually the cells stop listening to the insulin. However this is not correct. It is completely wrong. In fact, in another newsletter recently, I showed you a study showing that high sugar consumption correlates with a lower chance of getting diabetes. And this is very important as we will see. So one requirement to develop Type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance. And the other requirement is a breakdown of the beta cells producing insulin. So how do we get insulin resistance in the first place? Insulin resistance takes place in the muscles and the liver, and even in the brain. The biggest promoter of insulin resistance our free fatty acids in the blood. In fact, as this paper shows us, even healthy people become insulin resistant when they are given free fatty acids via intravenous feeding. And shockingly, it only takes a few hours for the change to happen. Healthy people bounce back, and usually dont remain insulin resistant. But if they have a diet that is high in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 diabetes has several causes: genetics and lifestyle are the most important ones. A combination of these factors can cause insulin resistance, when your body doesn’t use insulin as well as it should. Insulin resistance is the most common cause of type 2 diabetes. Genetics Play a Role in Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes can be hereditary. That doesn’t mean that if your mother or father has (or had) type 2 diabetes, you’re guaranteed to develop it; instead, it means that you have a greater chance of developing type 2. Researchers know that you can inherit a risk for type 2 diabetes, but it’s difficult to pinpoint which genes carry the risk. The medical community is hard at work trying to figure out the certain genetic mutations that lead to a risk of type 2. Lifestyle Is Very Important, Too Genes do play a role in type 2 diabetes, but lifestyle choices are also important. You can, for example, have a genetic mutation that may make you susceptible to type 2, but if you take good care of your body, you may not develop diabetes. Say that two people have the same genetic mutation. One of them eats well, watches their cholesterol, and stays physically fit, and the other is overweight (BMI greater than 25) and inactive. The person who is overweight and inactive is much more likely to develop type 2 diabetes because certain lifestyle choices greatly influence how well your body uses insulin. Lack of exercise: Physical activity has many benefits—one of them being that it can help you avoid type 2 diabetes, if you’re susceptible. Unhealthy meal planning choices: A meal plan filled with high-fat foods and lacking in fiber (which you can get from grains, vegetables, and fruits) increases the likelihood of type 2. Overweight/Obesity: Lack of exercise and unhealthy me Continue reading >>

Fat, Not Sugar, Causes Type 2 Diabetes

Fat, Not Sugar, Causes Type 2 Diabetes

​Though the media and most health professionals promote the message that high sugar consumption is the cause of type 2 diabetes, this idea is not really true. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease in which the body cells become resistant to insulin, resulting in a rise in blood sugar. High blood sugar is a symptom of diabetes, not the cause of the disease. So what then is the actual cause of type 2 diabetes? Every time a person eats, his or her blood sugar level rises. An increase in the concentrations of blood glucose stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin, the hormone responsible for transporting sugar from the bloodstream into the cells. Without insulin, glucose cannot get into the liver, muscle, and fat cells. Insulin signals fat, liver, and muscle cells to absorb glucose from the blood by opening the 'glucose gates' on the cells. Insulin works by binding to insulin receptors located on the surface of these cells and triggering a series of enzymes that activate a set of glucose transporter proteins (GLUT4) which convey glucose from the bloodstream into muscle, liver, and fat cells. Once glucose is transported into the cells, plasma concentrations of glucose return to normal within hours. What if the insulin signaling process is disrupted and cells can no longer respond to insulin? Disruption of the insulin signaling process will result in a condition called insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a condition where the pancreas secretes insulin, but fat and muscle cells do not respond to it by taking in the glucose. Since the glucose obtained from Insulin Resistance creating diets cannot get into the cells, and they have no where else to go, glucose will remain in the bloodstream, leading to an increase in blood sugar levels. This is what happens in type 2 dia Continue reading >>

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