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What Percentage Of People Die From Diabetes?

How Many People Have Diabetes?

How Many People Have Diabetes?

Rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing globally. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, here are the overall rates including both type 1 and type 2: 415 million adults have diabetes (1 in 11 adults) By 2040, 642 million adults (1 in 10 adults) are expected to have diabetes 46.5% of those with diabetes have not been diagnosed 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes 12% of global health expenditure is spent on diabetes ($673 billion) You can see an interactive map of global diabetes statistics at the IDF website. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the most current data is for 2012 (source): 29 million people in the United States (9.3 percent) have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with type or type 2 diabetes in 2012. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults are about twice as likely to have diagnosed with some form of diabetes as non-Hispanic white adults. 208,000 people younger than 20 years have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (39 percent), and Hispanics (38 percent). Similar data is available from a study called Prevalence and Incidence Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012 published in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study found that 49% to 52% of the adult population had either diabetes or prediabetes. Then came the most stunning number: 83% of adults over 65 have either diabetes or prediabetes! Thankfully, the authors of this s Continue reading >>

Fast Facts - Data And Statistics About Diabetes

Fast Facts - Data And Statistics About Diabetes

Unless otherwise noted, all references in Fast Facts are from the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 (link is external). The Fact Sheet is the product of a joint collaboration of the CDC, NIDDK, the American Diabetes Association, and other government and nonprofit agencies. Sources of data for Fast Facts that do not come from the Statistics Report: Approximately 1.25 million American children and adults have type 1 diabetes. Type 1 prevalence figure calculated from prevalence data from the CDC’s SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study and from data in the National Diabetes Statistics Report showing that type 1 diabetes represents 5% of diagnosed diabetes. Costs of diabetes. American Diabetes Association: Economic Costs of Diabetes in the United States in 2012. Diabetes Care 36: 1033—1046, 2013. 85.2% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report MMWR 2003 The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. increased by 382% from 1988 to 2014 Calculated from NIHS data Diabetes kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast cancer combined Diabetes: Health, United States, 2010: 69,201 deaths Breast cancer 40,676 deaths, 2009 AIDS, 21,601 deaths, 2009 A person with diagnosed diabetes at age 50 dies 6 years earlier than a counterpart without diabetes Diabetes Mellitus, Fasting Glucose, and Risk of Cause-Specific Death Other Sources of Statistics State by State and County Level Diabetes Statistics State by state diagnosed prevalence and county level diabetes statistics can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's web site. Economic Cost of Diabetes in the US 2012 A summary and links to the study and supplementary data can be found on DiabetesPro at professional.diabetes.org/cost. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Kills 3.4 Million People Every Year: Who

Diabetes Kills 3.4 Million People Every Year: Who

Nearly 350 million people worldwide have diabetes, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The United Nations health agency estimates that 3.4 million people die of diabetes every year, and almost 80 per of the deaths occur in developing countries. Tarik Jasarevic is WHO spokesperson in Geneva. "WHO projects that diabetes deaths will increase by two thirds until 2030. It is a chronic disease but it can be reduced very much by having appropriate lifestyle, reduction of use of alcohol, quitting to smoke, having a healthy diet and physical activity. So it is getting bigger and countries are aware of it." (Duration: 17") World Diabetes Day is observed on 14 November to raise global awareness of the disease and how to prevent it. It marks the birthday of Frederick Banting who, along with Charles Best was in 1922, instrumental in the discovery of insulin, a life-saving treatment for diabetes patients. Gerry Adams, United Nations. Duration: 1’04″ Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 1

Diabetes, Type 1

YESTERDAY In the 1950s, about one in five people died within 20 years after a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. One in three people died within 25 years of diagnosis. About one in four people developed kidney failure within 25 years of a type 1 diabetes diagnosis. Doctors could not detect early kidney disease and had no tools for slowing its progression to kidney failure. Survival after kidney failure was poor, with one of 10 patients dying each year. About 90 percent of people with type 1 diabetes developed diabetic retinopathy within 25 years of diagnosis. Blindness from diabetic retinopathy was responsible for about 12 percent of new cases of blindness between the ages of 45 and 74. Studies had not proven the value of laser surgery in reducing blindness. Major birth defects in the offspring of mothers with type 1 diabetes were three times higher than in the general population. Patients relied on injections of animal-derived insulin. The insulin pump would soon be introduced but would not become widely used for years. Studies had not yet shown the need for intensive glucose control to delay or prevent the debilitating eye, nerve, kidney, heart, and blood vessel complications of diabetes. Also, the importance of blood pressure control in preventing complications had not been established yet. Patients monitored their glucose levels with urine tests, which recognized high but not dangerously low glucose levels and reflected past, not current, glucose levels. More reliable methods for testing glucose levels in the blood had not been developed yet. Researchers had just discovered autoimmunity as the underlying cause of type 1 diabetes. However, they couldn’t assess an individual’s level of risk for developing type 1 diabetes, and they didn’t know enough to even consider Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

The Top 10 Causes Of Death

Why do we need to know the reasons people die? Measuring how many people die each year and why they died is one of the most important means – along with gauging how diseases and injuries are affecting people – for assessing the effectiveness of a country’s health system. Cause-of-death statistics help health authorities determine the focus of their public health actions. A country in which deaths from heart disease and diabetes rise rapidly over a period of a few years, for example, has a strong interest in starting a vigorous programme to encourage lifestyles to help prevent these illnesses. Similarly, if a country recognizes that many children are dying of pneumonia, but only a small portion of the budget is dedicated to providing effective treatment, it can increase spending in this area. High-income countries have systems in place for collecting information on causes of death. Many low- and middle-income countries do not have such systems, and the numbers of deaths from specific causes have to be estimated from incomplete data. Improvements in producing high quality cause-of-death data are crucial for improving health and reducing preventable deaths in these countries. Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

Mario Alberto Maciel Tinajero looks like a fairly healthy 68-year-old. He has a few extra pounds on his chest but he's relatively fit. Yet he's suffered for the last 20 years from what he calls a "terrible" condition: diabetes. "I've never gotten used to this disease," he says. Maciel runs a stall in the Lagunilla market in downtown Mexico City. This market is famous for its custom-made quinceañera dresses and hand-tailored suits. Diabetes has come to dominate Maciel's life. It claimed the life of his mother. He has to take pills and injections every day to keep it under control. And because of the disease he's supposed to eat a diet heavy in vegetables that he views as inconvenient and bland. "Imagine not being able to eat a carnitas taco!" he says with indignation. His doctors have told him to stop eating the steaming hot street food that's for sale all around the market — tacos, tamales, quesadillas, fat sandwiches called tortas. His eyes light up when talks about the roast pork taquitos and simmering beef barbacoa that he's supposed to stay away from. "A person who has to work 8 or 10 hours has to eat what's at hand, what's available," he says. "It's difficult to follow a diabetic diet. The truth is it's very difficult." Diabetes is the leading cause of death in Mexico, according to the World Health Organization. The disease claims nearly 80,000 lives each year, and forecasters say the health problem is expected to get worse in the decades to come. By contrast, in the U.S. it's the sixth leading cause of death, with heart disease and cancer claiming 10 times more Americans each year than diabetes. Rising rates of obesity combined with a genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes has caused a slow steady rise in the condition in Mexico over the last 40 years. Now Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information

Diabetes Information

Almost 30 million people in the United States have diabetes. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the disease, usually occurs in people who are 45 years of age or older. However, the rate of diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents is increasing. Common Diabetes Terms (American Diabetes Association) Diabetes Can Be Silent | Definition of Diabetes | Warning Signs of Diabetes | Type 1 Diabetes | Type 2 Diabetes | Gestational Diabetes | Complications of Diabetes Diabetes can go silently undetected for a long time without symptoms. Many people first become aware that they have diabetes when they develop one of its potentially life-threatening complications, such as heart disease, blindness or nerve disease. Fortunately, diabetes can be managed with proper care. Diabetes is a chronic (life-long) condition that can have serious consequences. However, with careful attention to your blood sugar control, lifestyle modifications and medications, you can manage your diabetes and may avoid many of the problems associated with the disease. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) can help you make the transition of managing your disease easier. Back to top Definition of Diabetes Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. The cause of diabetes is a mystery, although both genetics and environmental factors such as obesity and lack of exercise appear to play roles. There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 Type 2 Gestational Diabetes Back to top Warning Signs of Diabetes Frequent urination Unusual thirst Extreme hunger Continue reading >>

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Mortality Due To Diabetes

Key Messages Canada receives a “C” and ranks 15th out of 17 peer countries on mortality due to diabetes. Two million Canadians suffer from diabetes, a figure that is expected to increase to three million over the next decade. The prevalence of diabetes in Canada continues to increase. Putting mortality due to diabetes in context Diabetes is a global epidemic and, according to the International Diabetes Federation, “one of the most challenging health problems in the 21st century.” In 2011, diabetes accounted for about 4.6 million deaths worldwide.1 Globally, it is estimated that more than 350 million people suffer from diabetes; this number is expected to jump to over 550 million by 2030, if nothing is done.2 An estimated 280 million people worldwide have an impaired glucose tolerance—a precursor to diabetes. This number is projected to reach 398 million by 2030, or 7 per cent of the adult population.3 Diabetes has also shifted down a generation—from a disease of the elderly to one that affects those of working age or younger. According to the International Diabetes Federation, as a result of decreasing levels of physical activity and increasing obesity rates, type 2 diabetes in children has the potential to become a global public health issue.4 If you enjoyed this research, get regular updates by signing up to our monthly newsletter. Please enter your e-mail. Your e-mail was not in the correct format. It should be in the form [email protected] What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic, often debilitating, and sometimes fatal disease that occurs when there are problems with the production and use of insulin in the body, ultimately leading to high blood sugar levels. Long-term complications from diabetes include kidney disease, diminishing sight, loss of feeling in t Continue reading >>

Mortality From Diabetes Mellitus, 2004 To 2008: A Multiple-cause-of-death Analysis

Mortality From Diabetes Mellitus, 2004 To 2008: A Multiple-cause-of-death Analysis

Jungwee Park and Paul A. Peters Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in Canada. It occurs when the body is either unable to sufficiently produce or properly use insulin. Insulin, a hormone secreted by beta cells in the pancreas, enables the cells of the body to absorb sugar from the bloodstream and use it an energy source.1 People with type 1 diabetes mellitus produce little or no insulin; in type 2 diabetes mellitus, the pancreas continues to make insulin, but the body develops resistance to its effects, resulting in an insulin deficiency. In 2008/2009, close to 2.4 million Canadians, about 7% of the population, were living with diagnosed diabetes.1 Although many of its complications are associated with mortality, diabetes mellitus itself is not usually reported as the primary cause of death.1 For example, it is a risk factor for vascular complications such as coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, kidney disease and nerve damage,2 which are often listed as the underlying cause on the death certificate rather than diabetes mellitus. In accordance with international conventions, a single underlying cause is identified as the disease or injury that initiated the train of events leading directly to death.3 But for conditions that are often accompanied by a number of comorbidities, there may be no direct etiologic chain to facilitate identification of a single underlying cause4,5; instead, a combination of multiple factors results in mortality. Thus, the choice of an underlying cause may obscure the contribution of chronic conditions like diabetes mellitus. To overcome this limitation, multiple cause-of-death statistics that include contributing causes as well as the underlying cause are used. Such data provide a better understanding o Continue reading >>

The Discovery Of Insulin: A Medical Marvel For The Sugar Sickness

The Discovery Of Insulin: A Medical Marvel For The Sugar Sickness

Diabetes Before Insulin Diabetes, from the Greek word meaning "to pass through" or "pipe-like" has been claiming lives for thousands of years. A diabetic's body is unable to utilize food's nutrients as energy, causing extra sugar to collect in blood and urine (Bliss 20). Food simply "passes through" the body, without absorbing any nutrients. Slim Chances With no effective treatment aside from a semi-starvation diet, a diabetic's outlook appeared grim. Before 1922, diabetic children rarely lived a year after diagnosis, five percent of adults died within two years, and less than 20 percent lived more than ten (Berger 57). Untreated diabetics faced blindness, loss of limbs, kidney failure, stroke, heart attack and death (Yuwiler 12). Continue reading >>

Claims Of 24,000 'excess' Deaths From Diabetes

Claims Of 24,000 'excess' Deaths From Diabetes

As many as 24,000 people with diabetes are dying unnecessarily each year, many of the papers have reported today. This shock statistic was a conclusion from the National Diabetes Audit, the first ever report to look at deaths from the condition. While this is a large number of deaths, it must be viewed in context – millions of people live with this potentially life-threatening long-term illness, yet it can be managed safely. The National Diabetes Audit suggests that in England there are about 24,000 ‘excess deaths’ a year in people with diagnosed diabetes. This means that each year, around 24,000 more deaths occur among people with diabetes than would be expected to occur if their mortality risk was the same as that of the general population. A press release from the NHS Information Centre, which published the audit report, said these deaths could be avoided through better management of the condition. What other risks did the National Diabetes Audit find? The study found that the risk of death for a person with type 1 diabetes (where the insulin-producing cells of the body do not work at all) is 2.6 times higher than that of the general population. For people with type 2 diabetes (where the body does not produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells are not sensitive enough to insulin) it is 1.6 times higher. In younger people, the difference in mortality rates is even bigger. For example, women between 15 and 34 years of age who have type 1 diabetes are nine times more likely to die than women in the general population, and women of this age with type 2 diabetes are six times more likely to die. The report also found a strong link between deprivation and increased rates of early death. Among under-65s with diabetes, death rates among people from the most deprived Continue reading >>

Number Of Diabetes Deaths Per 100,000 Population

Number Of Diabetes Deaths Per 100,000 Population

Age-adjusted rates per 100,000 U.S. standard population. Rates for the United States and each state are based on populations enumerated in the 2010 census as of July 1, 2013. Since death rates are affected by the population composition of a given area, age-adjusted death rates should be used for comparisons between areas because they control for differences in population composition. Continue reading >>

371 Million People Have Diabetes Globally, About Half Undiagnosed

371 Million People Have Diabetes Globally, About Half Undiagnosed

Diabetes is now a disease that affects 371 million people worldwide, and 187 million of them do not even know they have the disease, according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). That represents an increase from last year's estimate, which showed 366 million people had the disease. While 4 million people died from the diabetes in 2011, estimates show that 4.8 million people will die this year from complications from the disease -- with people under 60 accounting for half the deaths. The results were released on Nov. 14, World Diabetes Day 2012, in order to bring awareness to the global problem. Researchers estimate that the diabetes dilemma will only increase. By 2030, they expect 552 million people will have the disease. "As millions of undiagnosed people develop diabetes complications, we can expect to see the mortality rate climb," Jean Claude Mbanya, President of the IDF, said in a press release. "On World Diabetes Day, we want to raise awareness that this disease can be controlled and in some cases prevented." The seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., diabetes is a problem that occurs when blood glucose levels are above normal, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. Glucose is the sugar that is processed from the food we eat, and our pancreas is supposed to make a hormone called insulin which helps the glucose get into our cells to give them energy. Having diabetes indicates that your body is not making enough insulin or isn't utilizing insulin as it should be. There are many types of diabetes, but the most common are Type 1 diabetes (5 percent of diagnosed cases), Type 2 diabetes (about 90 to 95 percent of diagnosed cases) and gestational diabetes (about 2 to 10 percent of diagnosed cases). Type 2 diabetes risk factors include ag Continue reading >>

Death Rates Due To Diabetes

Death Rates Due To Diabetes

You asked Please could I obtain the death rates due to diabetes related causes within the UK during 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015. We said Thank you for your query on deaths related to diabetes. The number of deaths registered in England and Wales each year by sex, age and underlying cause are available from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Mortality Statistics: Deaths Registered in England and Wales (Series DR) release. This is available on the ONS website: Special extracts and tabulations of mortality data, including the calculation of mortality rates for specific causes, are available to order (subject to legal frameworks, disclosure control, resources and agreements of costs, where appropriate). Such enquiries should be made to: [email protected] We recommend that you contact the Mortality Analysis team directly in order to discuss your data requirements in more detail. As this information is already available to you via this route ONS considers that S21(1) applies to this request and the information does not have to be supplied under the terms of the Freedom of Information Act. S21(1) is an absolute exemption and no consideration of the public interest test needs to be applied. Continue reading >>

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