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What Percent Of American Adults Have Diabetes?

Cdc: More Than 100 Million U.s. Adults Have Diabetes

Cdc: More Than 100 Million U.s. Adults Have Diabetes

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes greatly varies by region, race and age, according to a new report from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. While the rate of new diabetes cases is steady, a report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that a third of adults in the United States currently are living with diabetes or prediabetes. The National Diabetes Statistics Report found that as of 2015 30.3 million Americans are living with diagnosed diabetes and another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if left untreated leads to diabetes within five years. “Although these findings reveal some progress in diabetes management and prevention, there are still too many Americans with diabetes and prediabetes,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. in a statement. “More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don’t know it. Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease.” The report, which is released every two years, provides information on diabetes prevalence and incidence, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, mortality and costs in the U.S. According to the CDC, diabetes continues to represent a growing health problem. It was the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2015, and the disease is more prevalent in some area of the country than others. The southern and Appalachian areas of the United States had the highest rates of diagnosed diabetes and of new diabetes cases. While it can often be managed through physical activity, diet and the appropriate use of insulin and other medications to control blood sugar levels, people with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications Continue reading >>

One-third Of Americans With Prediabetes, New Report. That Also Means Higher Risk For Cancer.

One-third Of Americans With Prediabetes, New Report. That Also Means Higher Risk For Cancer.

More than a third of American adults are now living with prediabetes – with the majority unaware they have the condition – according to a new government report that can offer fresh motivation for millions to not only lower their risk of developing diabetes, but also of cancer. Along with a host of serious complications, having type 2 diabetes increases the risk of many cancers. Adults with diabetes have about twice the risk of developing cancers of the liver, pancreas and endometrium. There’s a clear but smaller increase in risk for colon and post-menopausal breast cancers. The two diseases – diabetes and cancer – share several key risk factors, including obesity and lack of physical activity. The CDC report finds that as of 2015, close to 10 percent – 30.3 million Americans –have diabetes. That rate of new diabetes diagnoses remains steady in recent years. Another 84 million adults have prediabetes, a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes. While the report did not differentiate between the two major types of the disease, type 2 diabetes accounts for about 95% of all diabetes cases. Linking diabetes to cancer – how to prevent both diseases with lifestyle change. The report gathered estimated prediabetes incidence using the latest available data from The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Key findings from the CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report include: In 2015, an estimated 1.5 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed among people ages 18 and older. Nearly 1 in 4 four adults living with diabetes – 7.2 million Americans – didn’t know they had the condition. Only 11.6 percent of adults with prediabetes knew they had it. Rates of diagnosed diabetes increased with age. Among those ages 18-44, 4 percent had diab Continue reading >>

Solera Health And The American Diabetes Association® Collaborate To Help Prevent And Delay Type 2 Diabetes For Millions Of Americans

Solera Health And The American Diabetes Association® Collaborate To Help Prevent And Delay Type 2 Diabetes For Millions Of Americans

Relationship Will Facilitate Access to CDC-Recognized Diabetes Prevention Programs for Eligible Consumers PHOENIX, AZ – October 18, 2017 – Solera Health (Solera), a preventive care benefits manager, today announced that they have joined forces with the American Diabetes Association (Association) to connect at-risk Americans to a Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The initiative seeks to help millions of Americans prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes by providing a streamlined process for adults at risk for type 2 diabetes to enroll in a community or digital DPP. The National DPP is a partnership of public and private organizations working together to reduce the growing number of Americans with and at risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. There are currently more than 1,500 DPPs, including brick-and-mortar locations such as community non-profits, health systems, retail pharmacies and faith-based organizations, as well as virtual DPPs that deliver content to mobile devices, computers and/or telephones. All programs are working to make it easier for people at risk for type 2 diabetes to participate in affordable and high-quality lifestyle change programs to reduce their risk and improve their overall health. According to the CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017, more than 84 million American adults are estimated to have prediabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Nearly 90 percent of American adults who have prediabetes are not aware they have it. Through this collaboration between Solera and the Association, millions of Americans who take the Association’s Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test will now have access to Solera Health’s consumer site Solera4Me, where they Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Epidemiology Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevalence (per 1,000 inhabitants) of diabetes worldwide in 2000 - world average was 2.8%. no data ≤ 7.5 7.5–15 15–22.5 22.5–30 30–37.5 37.5–45 45–52.5 52.5–60 60–67.5 67.5–75 75–82.5 ≥ 82.5 Disability-adjusted life year for diabetes mellitus per 100,000 inhabitants in 2004 No data <100 100–200 200–300 300–400 400–500 500–600 600–700 700–800 800–900 900–1,000 1,000–1,500 >1,500 Globally, an estimated 422 million adults are living with diabetes mellitus, according to the latest 2016 data from the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly; previous 2013 estimates from the International Diabetes Federation put the number at 381 million people having diabetes.[2] The number is projected to almost double by 2030.[3] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 85-90% of all cases.[4][5] Increases in the overall diabetes prevalence rates largely reflect an increase in risk factors for type 2, notably greater longevity and being overweight or obese.[1] Diabetes mellitus occurs throughout the world, but is more common (especially type 2) in the more developed countries. The greatest increase in prevalence is, however, occurring in low- and middle-income countries[1] including in Asia and Africa, where most patients will probably be found by 2030.[3] The increase in incidence in developing countries follows the trend of urbanization and lifestyle changes, including increasingly sedentary lifestyles, less physically demanding work and the global nutrition transition, marked by increased intake of foods that are high energy-dense but nutrient-poor (often high in sugar and saturated fats, sometimes referred to as the Western pattern diet).[1][3] The risk of getting type 2 diabetes has been widely found to be associat Continue reading >>

Half Of American Adults Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

Half Of American Adults Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes

MORE About half of American adults have either diabetes or prediabetes, a new study says. In 2011 to 2012, more than 12 percent of U.S. adults had diabetes, and 38 percent had prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are abnormally high, the study found. In addition, more than one-third of people with diabetes were undiagnosed, meaning they didn't know they had the condition. The percentage of people with undiagnosed diabetes was particularly high among Asian Americans — about 50 percent of Asian Americans with diabetes were not aware they had the condition, according to the study. "By learning more about who has diabetes — and who has the disease but does not know it — we can better target research and prevention efforts," Dr. Griffin Rodgers, director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), said in a statement. "We have treatments to help people with diabetes, but treatments can only help those who have been diagnosed." [5 Diets That Fight Diseases] Diabetes is a major cause of death in the United States, the researchers said. The condition also increases people's risk of heart disease and stroke and, if left untreated, can cause complications including nerve damage, kidney failure and blindness. Most cases of diabetes are type 2, in which the body's cells stop responding to the hormone insulin, which results in a buildup of sugar in the bloodstream. In the new study, the researchers analyzed information from more than 26,000 U.S. adults who took part in surveys between 1988 and 2012. Participants were asked whether they had ever been diagnosed with diabetes, and they also gave blood samples so that the researchers could check the participants' blood sugar levels. During the study period, the percentage of peo Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetes

Facts About Diabetes

Corrections, comments, pictures, ect., click here to email the Website Administrator to help support this website LIONS DIABETES AWARENESS FOUNDATION OF MULTIPLE DISTRICT 35 Data from the 2007 National Diabetes Fact Sheet Total: 23.6 million children and adults in the United States—7.8% of the population—have diabetes. Diagnosed: 17.9 million people Undiagnosed: 5.7 million people Pre-diabetes: 57 million people New Cases: 1.6 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older each year. Total prevalence of diabetes Under 20 years of age 186,300, or 0.22% of all people in this age group have diabetes About 1 in every 400 to 600 children and adolescents has type 1 diabetes About 2 million adolescents aged 12-19 have pre-diabetes Age 20 years or older 23.5 million, or 10.7% of all people in this age group have diabetes Age 60 years or older 12.2 million, or 23.1% of all people in this age group have diabetes Men 12.0 million, or 11.2% of all men aged 20 years or older have diabetes Women 11.5 million, or 10.2% of all women aged 20 years or older have diabetes Race and ethnic differences in prevalence of diagnosed diabetes After adjusting for population age differences, 2004-2006 national survey data for people diagnosed with diabetes, aged 20 years or older include the following prevalence by race/ethnicity: 6.6% of non-Hispanic whites 7.5% of Asian Americans 11.8% of non-Hispanic blacks 10.4% of Hispanics Among Hispanics rates were: 8.2% for Cubans 11.9% for Mexican Americans 12.6% for Puerto Ricans. Morbidity and Mortality Deaths Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death listed on U.S. death certificates in 2006. This ranking is based on the 72,507 death certificates in 2006 in which diabetes was listed as the underlying cause of dea Continue reading >>

How Many People Have Diabetes?

How Many People Have Diabetes?

Rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing globally. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Diabetes Atlas, here are the overall rates including both type 1 and type 2: 415 million adults have diabetes (1 in 11 adults) By 2040, 642 million adults (1 in 10 adults) are expected to have diabetes 46.5% of those with diabetes have not been diagnosed 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes 12% of global health expenditure is spent on diabetes ($673 billion) You can see an interactive map of global diabetes statistics at the IDF website. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the most current data is for 2012 (source): 29 million people in the United States (9.3 percent) have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with type or type 2 diabetes in 2012. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, and American Indian/Alaska Native adults are about twice as likely to have diagnosed with some form of diabetes as non-Hispanic white adults. 208,000 people younger than 20 years have been diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. 86 million adults aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35 percent), non-Hispanic blacks (39 percent), and Hispanics (38 percent). Similar data is available from a study called Prevalence and Incidence Trends for Diagnosed Diabetes Among Adults Aged 20 to 79 Years, United States, 1980-2012 published in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). This study found that 49% to 52% of the adult population had either diabetes or prediabetes. Then came the most stunning number: 83% of adults over 65 have either diabetes or prediabetes! Thankfully, the authors of this s Continue reading >>

Half Of Americans Have Diabetes Or A High Risk For It — And Many Of Them Are Unaware

Half Of Americans Have Diabetes Or A High Risk For It — And Many Of Them Are Unaware

That’s right. The metabolic condition is about as American as you can get, according to a new national report card on diabetes released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The report shows that nearly half of Americans have diabetes or prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for the condition. A good number of these folks haven’t been diagnosed and don’t even realize their predicament. People with diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. If the disease isn’t controlled, they can wind up with heart disease, nerve damage, kidney problems, eye damage and other serious health problems. The new report combines data from the CDC, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Indian Health Service and the Census Bureau. Here’s a numerical look at what they reveal about diabetes in America. 30.3 million The number of people in the U.S. who had diabetes in 2015. The percentage of the U.S. population that has diabetes. That’s nearly 1 in 10. 1.5 million The number of newly diagnosed cases of diabetes among U.S. adults in 2015. That works out to 6.7 new cases per 1,000 people. 24% The percentage of Americans with diabetes who don’t even know they have it. That’s 7.2 million people. 7 Where diabetes ranked on the list of leading causes of death in the U.S. in 2015. Diabetes was listed as a cause of death on 252,806 death certificates that year, including 79,535 that identified diabetes as the primary cause of death. There were two kinds of diabetes included in the study. Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile diabetes) occurs when the immune system prevents the body from making insulin, and type 2 diabetes (formerly known as adult-onset diabetes) occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t use it well. About 95 Continue reading >>

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes: Cdc

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes Or Prediabetes: Cdc

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than 100 million U.S. adults have diabetes or prediabetes, health officials say. As of 2015, more than 9 percent of the population -- 30.3 million -- had diabetes. Another 84.1 million had prediabetes, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Tuesday. People with prediabetes have elevated blood sugar levels, but not so high that they have full-blown diabetes, which requires medication or insulin injections. With exercise and a healthy diet, prediabetics can halve their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, the CDC noted. However, awareness levels remain too low. The new report found that nearly 1 in 4 adults with diabetes didn't even know they had the disease, and less than 12 percent with prediabetes knew they had that condition. If not treated, prediabetes often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years, the CDC said. "More than a third of U.S. adults have prediabetes, and the majority don't know it," CDC Director Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald said. "Now, more than ever, we must step up our efforts to reduce the burden of this serious disease," she said in a government news release. According to the report, the rate of new diabetes cases remains steady: 1.5 million new cases were diagnosed among people 18 and older in 2015. Incidence rose with age. Four percent of adults ages 18 to 44 had diagnosed diabetes, compared with 17 percent of people 45 to 64, and one-quarter of folks 65 and older. Dr. Minisha Sood is an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "It is reassuring that the rate of increase in diabetes cases has slowed, but we should not reduce our vigilance when it comes to optimizing metabolic health for Americans," Sood said. "Prevention is key to avoid the development of the condition Continue reading >>

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes, Prediabetes

More Than 100 Million Americans Have Diabetes, Prediabetes

The National Diabetes Statistics Report, released every two years, finds that as of 2015, 30.3 million Americans, or 9.4 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes — a disease in which the body's ability to produce or respond to the hormone insulin is impaired. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition which, if not treated, can lead to type 2 diabetes within five years. The largest portion of the population with diabetes was over 45: Among people ages 18 to 44, 4 percent had diabetes. Among people ages 45 to 64 years, 17 percent had diabetes. Among people 65 and older, 25 percent had diabetes. The study also found that nearly 1 in 4 adults living with diabetes, or 7.2 million Americans, didn’t know they had it. Only 11.6 percent of adults with prediabetes were aware of the condition. Diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, and the direct and indirect estimated cost of diabetes in the United States was $245 billion. Average medical expenditures were $13,700 per year, and about $7,900 of this amount was attributed to diabetes. After adjusting for age group and gender, average medical expenditures among people with diagnosed diabetes were about 2.3 times higher than the general population. Raising awareness about prediabetes To reduce the impact of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, the CDC established the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP), which includes a behavior change program to improve eating habits and increase physical activity. Even modest weight loss has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. The CDC is also partnering with the American Diabetes Association, the American Medical Association and the Ad Council to launch the first national public service advertising camp Continue reading >>

Overview

Overview

The importance of both diabetes and these comorbidities will continue to increase as the population ages. Therapies that have proven to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications will need to be assessed in light of the newly identified comorbidities. Lifestyle change has been proven effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. Based on this, new public health approaches are emerging that may deserve monitoring at the national level. For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program research trial demonstrated that lifestyle intervention had its greatest impact in older adults and was effective in all racial and ethnic groups. Translational studies of this work have also shown that delivery of the lifestyle intervention in group settings at the community level are also effective at reducing type 2 diabetes risk. The National Diabetes Prevention Program has now been established to implement the lifestyle intervention nationwide. Another emerging issue is the effect on public health of new laboratory based criteria, such as introducing the use of A1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or for recognizing high risk for type 2 diabetes. These changes may impact the number of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and facilitate the introduction of type 2 diabetes prevention at a public health level. Several studies have suggested that process indicators such as foot exams, eye exams, and measurement of A1c may not be sensitive enough to capture all aspects of quality of care that ultimately result in reduced morbidity. New diabetes quality-of-care indicators are currently under development and may help determine whether appropriate, timely, evidence-based care is linked to risk factor reduction. In addition, the scientific evid Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

50% Us Adults Have Diabetes Or Pre-diabetes - Study

50% Us Adults Have Diabetes Or Pre-diabetes - Study

Half of all US adults currently have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a new study revealed. The new research shows that the disease has made gains across every racial and ethnic group in the last 18 years, regardless of income level or education. “We found 14% of the people in the US have diabetes, and this was even higher in blacks, Asians and Hispanics,” said Andy Menke, PhD, epidemiologist and lead author for the study, which was published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Previous studies had shown cases of diabetes, once a rare disease, increasing. There are currently an estimated 27 million people with diabetes and 86 million with pre-diabetes in the US, according to the WebMD website. Researchers conducting the study wanted find percentages for those in the population who had been diagnosed with diabetes, those with undiagnosed diabetes, and those with pre-diabetes indicators. Among the findings was that diabetes was more prevalent in those aged 65 years and older, with 33 percent affected, compared to those aged 45-64 years (17.5 percent), and those aged 45 or younger (5 percent). Broken down by gender, diabetes affected 15 percent of men and 13 percent of women. The study involved 26,000 people participating in a series of nationally representative surveys conducted by the National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys organization. It involved in-home interviews and mobile exam centers, the testing of blood samples for glucose levels, as well as the use of the Body Mass Index, which measures fat and muscle ratios based on weight and height. The first survey was conducted between 1988 and 1994, and the most recent between 2011 and 2012. Researchers found a 25 percent increase in diabetes in each age group, for both sexes and each rac Continue reading >>

Percentage Of Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes By Age Group

Percentage Of Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes By Age Group

Tools: State data based upon the BRFSS, an ongoing, state-based, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of noninstitutionalized civilian adults aged 18 years and older. Women who indicated that they had diabetes only during pregnancy were not included in these data. Total adults diagnosed with diabetes by state have been age-adjusted to the U.S. population in 2000. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

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