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What Organs And Body Systems Are Affected By Diabetes?

How Does Diabetes Affect The Digestive System?

How Does Diabetes Affect The Digestive System?

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with diabetes or have been living with the disease for a while, you’re more than likely familiar with possible complications, like kidney disease, vision loss, and even amputations. But it’s important to note that poorly controlled type 2 diabetes can also affect other parts of your body, including your digestive system, and that the longer you’ve lived with diabetes, the more likely it may be that you could experience these types of problems. In fact, some research suggests 75 percent of people visiting diabetes clinics report having significant gastrointestinal symptoms. How Diabetic Neuropathy Can Lead to Heartburn and Other Issues So how might diabetes affect the digestive system? “Advanced diabetes, whether it’s from type 1 or type 2 diabetes, can affect any organ in the body — including those organs in the digestive tract,” says James C. Reynolds, MD, a gastroenterology specialist and clinical medicine professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Reynolds notes digestive problems may be caused by the very factors that led to diabetes in the first place, such as obesity, but it’s also possible that digestive problems are the result of diabetes-related complications, such as hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar. One of the most serious diabetes complications that can result from consistent high blood sugar is diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage. Neuropathy may lead to weakness, pain, and numbness, affecting feeling in your feet, legs, and hands, but the condition can also affect digestive functions like swallowing and constipation, Reynolds explains. If you have diabetes, this potential complication is just another reason it’s crucial to pay attention to your A1C, the average level of glucose o Continue reading >>

Which Systems Of The Body Are Affected By Diabetes?

Which Systems Of The Body Are Affected By Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which inadequate production of the hormone insulin or a resistance to its actions in the body can lead to high blood sugar levels. Insulin is needed to get sugar into cells of the body, where it is used for energy. When sugar cannot get into cells, it remains in the blood at high levels. Complications of diabetes arise from long-term exposure to high blood sugar. The cardiovascular, nervous, visual and urinary systems are most commonly affected by chronically high blood sugars. Video of the Day The cardiovascular system includes the heart and blood vessels. High blood sugar and increased blood fat levels commonly found in people with diabetes contribute to fatty deposits called plaques on the inner walls of blood vessels, causing inflammation. This leads to decreased blood flow and hardening of the blood vessels called atherosclerosis. High blood sugar also results in glycation, where sugars attach to proteins, making them sticky. This occurs on proteins found in blood vessels, also resulting in inflammation. When this occurs in the heart, it can lead to cardiovascular disease. According to a 2016 report from the American Heart Association, 68 percent of people with diabetes older than 65 die of heart disease. Nerve damage called diabetic neuropathy is common in people with diabetes. Symptoms typically appear after several years but may be present when diabetes is diagnosed, as the disease may have gone undetected for many years. Diabetic nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy is most common in the legs and feet. According to a 2005 statement by the American Diabetes Association, up to 50 percent of people with diabetes have peripheral neuropathy. This typically starts as numbness or tingling that progresses to loss of p Continue reading >>

Long-term Complications

Long-term Complications

Focusing on the day-to-day needs of kids with diabetes — like giving insulin injections or making healthy snacks — is important because it helps kids manage their blood sugar levels, which is a key part of preventing long-term diabetes problems. Long-term complications related to diabetes are often linked to having high blood sugar levels over a long period of time. But blood sugar control isn't the only thing that determines someone's risk for complications. Factors like genetics also can play a role. Many diabetes complications don't appear until after many years of having the disease. They usually develop silently and gradually over time, so even if kids show no symptoms, they still might eventually have complications. Talking or thinking about long-term complications can be scary for parents and kids. And it's difficult for kids to make changes in how they live today to decrease their risk for health problems that may not show up for decades. But being aware of diabetes complications can help you and your child anticipate and avoid them. In fact, helping kids manage their diabetes with good nutrition, regular exercise, and medication under the supervision of the diabetes health care team is the best way to help them lessen their risk of developing complications and enjoy a healthy future. Where Complications Can Occur The major organs and body systems involved in diabetes complications are the: eyes kidneys nerves heart and blood vessels gums Eye Problems People with diabetes have a greater risk of developing eye problems, including: Cataracts: A cataract is a thickening and clouding of the lens of the eye. The lens is the part of the eye that helps you focus on what you see. People with diabetes are more likely to develop cataracts. Cataracts can make a vision Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Endocrine System

Diabetes And The Endocrine System

Transcript of Diabetes and the endocrine system What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a problem with someone's body that causes blood glucose ( sugar) levels to rise higher than normal. There are two kinds of diabetes; Type 1 and Type 2 What are the symptoms of having diabetes? The common symptoms are: urinating often, feeling thirsty, feeling hungry, tiredness, laziness, blurry vision, cuts or bruises that heal slowly, wight loss, and pain or numbness in the hands and feet. What body system does diabetes affect? Diabetes affects the Endocrine system Glands produce and discharge hormones. The hormones regulate the body's growth and the sexual development of the body. Hormones are chemicals in the body. Hormones transfer messages to and from cells. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is typically found in children and young adults Type 1 diabetes does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is produced in the body Insulin is needed to convert sugar, starches and other kinds of food into energy needed for daily life. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin properly The pancreas ( which make the insulin) create extra insulin but eventually it isn't able to keep up and can not make enough insulin to keep the blood glucose at normal levels. What is the Endocrine System? It includes all of the glands in the body and it also includes the hormones produces by the glands as well as the pancreas. Pancreas There is a gland organ in the upper abdomen called the "pancreas." The pancreas breaks down the proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and the nucleic acids in food. The pancreas release the hormone insulin into the body to control blood sugar levels. Diabetes & the Endocrine System By: Sasha Pollak Structure Continue reading >>

Body Areas Affected By Diabetes

Body Areas Affected By Diabetes

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

How Hearing Loss Affects Our Bodily Processes

How Hearing Loss Affects Our Bodily Processes

Our bodies require clean fuel and nutrients to run properly. Research over the past several decades has shown that hearing health is closely related to many bodily processes, including memory, heart function, blood health, and even stress and anxiety. Whether those processes cause or simply indicate a hearing impairment is still up for debate, but the correlations are there. Knowing your body’s relationship with hearing can help you stay mindful of your overall well-being and help create a path for healthier living. The Heart Many of the same unhealthy patterns of behavior that affect the heart — poor nutrition, lack of exercise, and smoking, to name a few — are related to loss of hearing, and it’s no surprise why: Hardening or narrowing of the arteries due to heart disease restricts blood flow to the cochlea, the organ in the inner ear most responsible for hearing ability. Effects: These restrictions can starve the cochlea of oxygen, which is necessary for healthy cells. Hearing loss may also be a predictor of heart disease, as the inner ear is so sensitive to blood flow that possible abnormalities in the cardiovascular system are more easily recognized here than in other less sensitive parts of the body. Prevention: Taking better care of your ticker can not only increase your life span but prevent compounded hearing loss as well. The Brain The strong correlation between dementia and hearing loss has been well documented, but perhaps less well known is that older individuals with hearing loss experience a greater rate of brain shrinkage. Effects: Although the brain naturally shrinks with age, the rate of atrophy increases by an additional cubic centimeter per year in those with at least a mild (25 dB) hearing loss — and the shrinkage occurs in regions associa Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes

Complications Of Diabetes

Over time persistent high blood glucose levels (BGLs) can damage the body's organs. This damage is referred to as 'diabetes-related complications'. While these complications are serious and can be life-threatening, with appropriate lifestyle changes and attention to blood glucose control, people with diabetes can greatly reduce the risk of these complications. Heart disease and stroke People with diabetes are at increased risk of heart disease and stroke due to raised BGLs, in association with high blood pressure and cholesterol. You should discuss your individual risk factors and how to reduce them with your doctor or diabetes educator. In general terms, the risk of heart disease in diabetes can be reduced by: losing weight if you are overweight managing blood fats managing high blood pressure taking medication as prescribed. For more information speak to your doctor or specialist or contact the Australian Diabetes Council Customer Care Line on 1300 DIABETES or 1300 342 238 and ask to speak to a Diabetes Educator. High Blood Pressure As well as being a risk factor for developing diabetes, high blood pressure can also be a complication of diabetes. Diabetes changes the body chemistry to increase the risk of high blood pressure. As having high blood pressure in diabetes further increases the risk of other complications of diabetes, it is important that it is adequately monitored and, if necessary, controlled. You should get your blood pressure checked every time you go to the doctor, and at least: every 6 months for people with normal blood pressure 3 months for people with high blood pressure every 4-8 weeks if your blood pressure medication is being changed. Skin Damage to the small blood vessels and nerves common in people with diabetes can cause very dry skin. This c Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

With an increase of glucose in the blood, our digestive systems can experience problems with absorbing necessary nutrients. Diabetes is currently one of the most common health conditions. This illness arises when the body is not capable of producing insulin, something that usually helps regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. Diabetes varies in type and severity, but regardless of these details they all pose health risks. While it continues to be incurable, it is treatable. For this reason, we are about to explain in detail how diabetes affects the digestive system. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The functions of the digestive system One of the most important systems in a human being is the digestive system. It is a network of organs including the mouth, the pharynx, and the stomach, which must transform food into something that can be absorbed by parts of the body, mainly cells, so that it can function. The complete digestive cycle is comprised of transportation, secretion, absorption, and excretion in order for the body to function properly. It supplies all of the nutrients our bodies need through this process. It also allows us to clean or dispose of those elements that our bodies no longer need. How diabetes affects the digestive system As we already know, digestion is an automatic process. This means that our body does not require a conscious stimulus to work and digest food. The opposite is actually true, the digestive system operates on its own thanks to the nervous system. Diabetes creates issues with this system that prevent proper functioning of the digestive system. When the blood has an increased amount of glucose, our digestive system can Continue reading >>

Role Of Multiple Organs And Tissues In Type 2 Diabetes

Role Of Multiple Organs And Tissues In Type 2 Diabetes

SHARE RATE★★★★★ Type 2 diabetes is increasingly seen as a disease in which multiple organs and tissues in the body play a role in causing high blood glucose. In fact, nowadays when researchers consider type 2 diabetes, they think of the “ominous octet” or organs and tissues that work together to contribute to elevated blood glucose. This octet includes1: Muscle Fat cells Liver Beta cells in the pancreas Alpha cells in the pancreas Intestine Kidney Brain Muscle tissue. Muscle tissue throughout the body contribute to elevated blood glucose by becoming resistant to insulin and unable to take up glucose for cellular energy needs. Fat cells. Fat cells in people with type 2 diabetes exhibit increased breakdown of fats and other lipids that contributes insulin resistance and increases fat deposits throughout the body. Liver. In type 2 diabetes, the liver—a major site of glucose storage—attempts to compensate for the decreased ability of the body to use glucose and increases glucose production. Pancreas (beta and alpha cells). Both alpha cells and beta cells in the pancreas play a central role in type 2 diabetes. Beta cells lose the ability to produce insulin, while alpha cells increase production of glucagon, the hormone that plays a role in transforming glycogen stored in the liver and muscles back into glucose. Additionally, beta cells also produce the hormone amylin, which controls how quickly glucose is released into the blood stream after eating. Intestine. Gastrointestinal tissues in the intestine become deficient in producing the hormones called incretins and resistant to its effects. Incretins stimulate the body to produce insulin after eating and also slow emptying of the stomach, which promotes the feeling of fullness and delays the release of gluco Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

When you hear the word “diabetes,” your first thought is likely about high blood sugar. Blood sugar is an often-underestimated component of your health. When it’s out of whack over a long period of time, it could develop into diabetes. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that allows your body to turn glucose (sugar) into energy. Here’s what symptoms may occur to your body when diabetes takes effect. Diabetes can be effectively managed when caught early. However, when left untreated, it can lead to potential complications that include heart disease, stroke, kidney damage, and nerve damage. Normally after you eat or drink, your body will break down sugars from your food and use them for energy in your cells. To accomplish this, your pancreas needs to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin is what facilitates the process of pulling sugar from the blood and putting it in the cells for use, or energy. If you have diabetes, your pancreas either produces too little insulin or none at all. The insulin can’t be used effectively. This allows blood glucose levels to rise while the rest of your cells are deprived of much-needed energy. This can lead to a wide variety of problems affecting nearly every major body system. The effects of diabetes on your body also depends on the type you have. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1, also called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an immune system disorder. Your own immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, destroying your body’s ability to make insulin. With type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin to live. Most people are diagnosed as a child or young adult. Type 2 is related to insulin resistance. It used to occur i Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes is a long-term condition that can have a major impact on the life of a child or young person, as well as their family or carers. In addition to insulin therapy, diabetes management should include education, support and access to psychological services, as detailed here and in this guideline. Preparations should also be made for the transition from paediatric to adult services, which have a somewhat different model of care and evidence base. Rapid‐acting insulin analogues (artificial insulin such as insulin lispro, insulin aspart, or insulin glulisine) act more quickly than regular human insulin. In people with a specific type of life‐threatening diabetic coma due to uncontrolled diabetes, called diabetic ketoacidosis, prompt administration of intravenous regular insulin is standard therapy. The rapid‐acting insulin analogues, if injected subcutaneously, act faster than subcutaneously administered regular insulin. The need for a continuous intravenous infusion, an intervention that usually requires admission to an intensive care unit, can thereby be avoided. This means that subcutaneously given insulin analogues for diabetic ketoacidosis might be applied in the emergency department and a general medicine ward. Type 1 diabetes affects over 370,000 adults in the UK, representing approximately 10% of adults diagnosed with diabetes. Given the complexity of its treatment regimens, successful outcomes depend, perhaps more than with any other long-term condition, on full engagement of the adult with type 1 diabetes in life-long day-by-day self-management. In order to support this, the health service needs to provide informed, expert support, education and training as well as a range of other more conventional biomedical services and interventionsfor the preventio Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Circulatory System

Diabetes And The Circulatory System

When blood glucose levels become uncontrolled, and the glucose levels in the blood remain dangerously high, the blood vessels in certain parts of the body become damaged. This affects the body’s ability to circulate blood as effectively as usual. The lower legs and feet are particularly susceptible to this, therefore a tingling sensation in these parts of the body should be a warning to all diabetics. If this is experienced, immediate medical attention is needed. Foot infections, coupled with reduced circulation could easily lead to gangrene and the necessity for amputations. - (Health24, February 2010) Continue reading >>

Which Organ Does Diabetes Affect The Most?

Which Organ Does Diabetes Affect The Most?

My mother is a diabetic for almost 25 years. She has type-2 diabetes. In April 2015, she was diagnosed with diabetic nephropathy, a complication that manifests in long term diabetics. Besides eyes, kidneys are one of those organs which are worst hit by diabetes in long run. My mother has always abstained from foods which could aggravate her blood sugar levels. She had never sought domestic help for household chores because she knew that mild form of physical activity would help her condition. That is true indeed. The complications that come with diabetes can actually be delayed by leading a healthy lifestyle. Apart from that, diabetics should undergo complete medical checkup in every six months. This is important. Long before she was diagnosed with nephropathy she had been showing some symptoms such as swelling on her face and feet, increase in body weight despite no change in diet, feeling tired and lethargic all day long. These symptoms looked quite normal to us because they had occurred before. She would take some diuretic (medication used to increase urine flow) and swelling would go after sometime. But this time swelling was recurring. This happened during the period of Jan-Mar (2015). One day she fell ill for no apparent reason. Apart from fever, chronic swelling appeared gradually all over her body. She kept taking medicines to alleviate her fever and swelling but it was of little help. Recurring fever was a matter of worry to us and that’s when she got her blood tested. The doctor had the intuition that the problem could be related to kidneys as he knew that my mother was a long term diabetic. Her blood report came as a shock to us. Her blood urea and creatinine were dangerously high. Creatinine was approx 7 mg/dl. Creatinine is a waste which is produced as a Continue reading >>

Effects Of Diabetes

Effects Of Diabetes

In some cases the effects may be short term and can be eliminated through appropriate treatment. In the case of long term complications, any damage sustained tends to be permanent. Whilst there are a lot of ways in which diabetes can affect the body, it’s important to note that the risks of developing health problems can be significantly reduced through good management of diabetes and living a healthy life. Heart Higher than normal blood sugar levels over a period of time can lead to an increase in risk of damage occurring to larger blood vessels in the body. This raises the risk of blood clots forming in blood vessels which can lead to heart attacks – a form of coronary heart disease. Approximately, 600,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year–that’s 1 in every 4 deaths. Learn more about Heart disease. Brain The brain is another major organ that can pose a threat to life if it is affected by damage or blockages in its blood supply. Elevated blood sugar levels over a long period of time can cause blockages in the blood vessels supplying the brain, resulting in stroke, and can also damage the very small blood vessels in the outer part of the brain, increasing the risk of brain damage and conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. In the short term, too low blood glucose levels can lead to a reduced ability to make decisions and cause confusion and disorientation. Nerves The nerves play a very important part throughout the body. Not only do they allow us to sense touch, nerves also allow our organs to function properly. For instance, nerves are crucial in helping the digestive system to sense how it should respond. If the nerves become damaged we can lose our ability to sense pain in parts of the body that are affected and if nerve damage (ne Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life

How Diabetes Can Affect Your Sex Life

Most people are aware that diabetes contributes to heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, blindness and renal failure. It’s a progressive disease that can debilitate one’s body, organ by organ, when left out of control. But did you know that, long before any of these take place, diabetes can kill your sex life? Diabetes itself is not responsible for the damage done to the body. Instead, it is the rise in blood sugar that comes from either insufficient insulin release (type 1 diabetes) or a body’s resistance to the effects of insulin (type 2 diabetes). Unlike type 1 diabetes, which starts in childhood, type 2 diabetes begins in adults and is almost always related to being obese or overweight for some time. Often, it can be reversed if you return to a normal weight. Many doctors are happy if they see their diabetic patients maintain their blood sugar under 150, or even 180 if they’ve had the disease for a while. I believe, however, these levels still permit slow degeneration of the tissues and nerves of the body, which can severely affect quality of life. Ideally, a level between 80 and 125 is best. Good sexual functioning depends on good blood flow and the ability to not only perceive sensations, but to have the organs and tissues respond to these sensations. When your blood sugar is high, cells cannot function properly and nerve endings become damaged. This can cause numbness—or worse, uncomfortable tingling. Uncontrolled levels of blood sugar also damage the blood vessels by decreasing their ability to relax and contract when needed, as well as by raising the risk of atherosclerosis, which in turn impairs blood flow. These changes can affect your sex life, too. Nerve damage can result in decreased sensation in the genitals, which makes it more di Continue reading >>

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