diabetestalk.net

What Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Etiquette: What To Say And What To Keep To Yourself

Diabetes Etiquette: What To Say And What To Keep To Yourself

Show friends and family members with diabetes you care by following this simple diabetes etiquette guide. Developed by William Polonsky, Ph.D., CDE, president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute, these "diabetiquette" tips show you 10 ways to support and encourage a loved one who has diabetes. DO realize and appreciate that managing diabetes is hard work. Diabetes management is a full-time job that your loved one didn't apply for, didn't want, and can't quit. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much to eat, while also factoring in exercise, medication, stress, blood sugar monitoring, and so much more -- each and every day. Just being aware of this can help you be more understanding. From our readers: "My family encourages me when they know I'm not feeling well and need a little extra help." -- Denise Feller, PWD type 2, from Peoria, Illinois. DON'T offer unsolicited advice about nutrition or other aspects of diabetes. You may mean well, but giving advice about someone's personal habits isn't kind -- especially when the advice is not requested. Besides, many of the popularly held beliefs about diabetes (for example, "you should just stop eating sugar") are outdated or just plain wrong. From our readers: "It makes me angry when people who know nothing about diabetes tell me what I should and shouldn't eat." -- Kelsey Bodenhamer, PWD type 2, from Tulsa, Oklahoma. DO offer to join in making healthy lifestyle changes. Offer to partner with your loved one in efforts to change, such as starting an exercise program. It's one of the most powerful ways you can help. After all, a healthy lifestyle benefits everyone! From our readers: "My coworkers go for walks with me over our lunch breaks. They cheer for me when I lose a little weight, and ask me what my blood sugars Continue reading >>

6 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Diabetes

6 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Diabetes

After living with type 1 diabetes for nearly 17 years there are still comments that take me by surprise, and not usually in a good way. People chuckle when I tell them the title of the book I wrote, "If I Kiss You, Will I Get Diabetes?"...but I chose that title because my senior prom date asked me that before he went in there for the kiss! There are so many misconceptions about people living with diabetes and in my work as a spokesperson for various diabetes-related groups, I try hard to dispell them. Here are some insulting comments I've received over the years. Don't be this person. 6 Things You Should Never Say to Someone with Diabetes: 1. "It's your fault you got diabetes."This can be said in several different ways…."you ate too much when you were younger", or "your parents fed you too much candy when you were a kid", or when people say, "if you had just eaten better and/or exercised more you wouldn't have diabetes." First off, if you were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, we could’ve eaten spinach leaves for breakfast, lunch and dinner and still had the same fate…it’s an auto-immune disease. If you have type 2 diabetes, although lifestyle factors do play a factor in diagnosis, there are also several other factors that play into getting diagnosed….family history, race and older age. Let's be honest….I would say most people don't respond well to being shamed. 2. "I could never have diabetes because I could never give myself a shot." This is simply not helpful. Do you think I enjoy being a pincushion? For my younger brother Will and I, we had no choice in getting diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at a very young age. You’re forced into a new discipline and you have no choice if you want to take shots or not. Insulin is our life support. Trust me, if we didn't Continue reading >>

7 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

7 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

7 Things You Should Never Say to Someone with Type 1 Diabetes Medically reviewed by George Krucik, MD on October 21, 2015 Written by The Healthline Editorial Team If you have diabetes, you know that what others say about your health isnt always right. And, not to mention, type 1 and type 2 diabetes are oftentimes confused for one another. Your family and friends may think their words of wisdom are helpful, when theyre really hurtful. We asked people who are living with type 1 diabetes to share the most bothersome or annoying things people they know have said about the disease. Heres a sampling of what those people said and what they couldve said instead. One of the biggest misunderstandings about type 1 diabetes is what causes it. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 isnt caused by environmental factors like high cholesterol levels, obesity, or a sedentary lifestyle. The exact causes of type 1 diabetes are unknown. Its best not to guess or make assumptions about your friends health history. Do your research, and ask them questions if they seem open to it. Type 1 diabetes affects the pancreas and blood glucose levels, not body weight. Dont be surprised if your friend can outrun you on the track: They may be in better shape than you, despite having type 1. Meal planning is top priority for someone living with type 1 diabetes. Something as simple as going out for ice cream after dinner or grabbing popcorn at the movie theater can wreak havoc on your friends glucose levels. While you certainly dont need to manage your friends eating schedule, a friendly reminder if you have that type of relationship can show that you care. With more than 1.25 million Americans living with the disease, type 1 diabetes isnt something to be ashamed or embarrassed about. If your friend doesnt think Continue reading >>

Top 29 Most Annoying Things To Say To People With Diabetes

Top 29 Most Annoying Things To Say To People With Diabetes

Before I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I didn’t know anything about the disease. I might have also said something thoughtless out of pure ignorance. That’s what I try to remind myself when a non-diabetic (or maybe even a diabetic) says something to me about diabetes that is rude, annoying, or even offensive. These comments often stem from a simple lack of knowledge, being misinformed by general media, sometimes thoughtlessness and lack of consideration, and sometimes even fear. While I try to remind myself to be patient with a person’s lack of knowledge around diabetes, and that I believe it’s important that I try to kindly educate and teach those people (so they don’t repeat the same comments to someone else), those comments can still get old, hurt your feelings, make you laugh, and frustrate you to no end. This list is about knowing you’re not alone, and you’re not the only one who has been on the receiving end of these comments. The top 29 most annoying things to say to people with any type of diabetes: My grandma had diabetes. She lost her leg, then she died. (Thank you, that’s inspiring!) You’ll die if you eat sugar, right? You have diabetes? You don’t look that fat. (Gee, thanks….) You take insulin? Oh, you must have the bad kind of diabetes. (Really? What’s the good kind?) Your child has diabetes? Did they get it because you fed them too much candy? Oh my god, you have to take shots every day? I’d die if I had to do that. (Well, I’d die if I didn’t.) Doesn’t that hurt? (Um, yeah, it’s a sharp object going into my body. Duh!) Well, that sounds better than something like leukemia. Oh my god, can you eat that? You can’t eat that! That’s the disease that causes you to lose your legs, right? I heard you can cure that with di Continue reading >>

What Would You Say? | Diabetes Stops Here

What Would You Say? | Diabetes Stops Here

Posted on January 25, 2011 by American Diabetes Association When I was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes , I was a college student. The entire semester was a blur for me, but I do remember some of the comments and convoluted (though well-intended) advice people offered me. There was the classic my great-great aunt Martha had diabetes. The confused so, no sugar for you, right? And the incredulous But youre not even, um, big What I remember the most, however, was the one professor whose class I had to miss in order to attend a diabetes education class. She was one of those professors who you dont want to mess with. I tried to casual, confident and in control, explaining that Id just been diagnosed and I would not be in class that afternoon. Her jaw dropped and she said, Oh my I am so sorry. Thats awful. Embarrassed, I tried to smile and said, Oh, no, Ill be okay so anyway, Ill look at notes from other people in class and She still looked stunned. No, really, Dayle are you okay? Thats quite bad news, you know. Whether I considered it to be bad news or not, I wasnt ready to hear it then, or from her. Instead, I wanted to focus on catching up on the class I had to miss. Recently, a friend of mine was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes . Ready to take the bull by the horns, he asked a few questions and shared pieces of information hed already learned. At first, I felt tongue-tied. I wasnt sure what to say. I didnt want to say that I was sorry for him (I didnt like hearing that when my professor said it to me). I didnt want to start lecturing him (its overwhelming enough and it takes time to let information sink in). I certainly didnt want to say congratulations (because, well, thats just weird). Despite his recent diagnosis , I know that hell be able to adjust to the ups and Continue reading >>

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

1. There is no "mild form" of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is when the body doesn't produce any insulin, while type 2 diabetes is when the body doesn't make enough insulin or the insulin it does make doesn't work properly. There's a myth that type 2 is the milder form – but it's false. "It is a commonly held belief that type 2 is the mild form and less serious than type 1 diabetes. This is in fact not true, as both type 1 and 2 diabetes can lead to serious health problems such as blindness, amputation, kidney disease, heart disease, and stroke, if not managed well. "Type 1 diabetes can be sudden onset, where a person may become quite unwell very quickly, whereas type 2 diabetes can go undetected for a number of years. Both types of diabetes need to be treated as soon as possible to avoid diabetes-related complications." – Deepa Khatri, clinical adviser, Diabetes UK 2. You don't get it from "eating too much sugar". "I didn't get it from eating too much sugar. There's nothing I can't eat or drink. And type 1 and type 2 are two completely different conditions. There's two types, I'm talking about type 1, the autoimmune condition. There's nothing I did to get it, there's nothing I could have done to prevent it, and it's not contagious. "No, it's not because I ate too much sugar as a kid, and yes, I can still eat that bit of cake. I can eat anything I want, and I can do pretty much what I want when I want to do it – my T1 doesn't hold me back in any way. It's a lot more than just taking a couple of insulin injections though – there's a lot more to it." – Connor McHarg 3. And it's a serious illness. "One of my major frustrations is that people tend not to view diabetes as a 'serious' illness and will go as far to say that it's self-inflicted due to certain lifestyle ch Continue reading >>

Seven Things Not To Say To Someone With Diabetes

Seven Things Not To Say To Someone With Diabetes

Seven things not to say to someone with diabetes Living with diabetes is difficult. Avoid making it harder with ill-informed or insensitive remarks. You probably know someone who has diabetes . More than 29 million Americans live with the disease. It limits their bodies from processing food into usable energy. Diabetes is complicated. There are a lot of stereotypes and myths floating around about it. Friends, family members, co-workers or strangers can make comments that can be judgmental even if they dont mean to be. Remember that your words have a major impact. Choose them carefully. Said in the right way, your support can make a positive difference for someone with diabetes. Margaret (Maggie) Powers, PhD, RD, CDE, is a research scientist with the Park Nicollet International Diabetes Center , a certified diabetes educator and a registered dietitian. She has put together a list of the insensitive remarks that are most commonly made. Check them out to learn what you should avoid saying. Powers also includes facts and advice on the best way to show your support. Why do you have diabetes? Did you eat too much sugar? Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar. Diabetes and its risk factors are complex. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune response in a persons body where the bodys immune system attacks itself. Its caused by genetics and other triggering factors that have yet to be determined. Right now, there is no way to stop the onset of type 1 diabetes. The onset of type 2 diabetes is caused by genetics, lifestyle and many unknown factors. Research has shown that we can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes for some. However, there is no single cause or prevention strategy for all. So what is helpful to say? Ask how you can support them in caring for their diabetes. Are yo Continue reading >>

10 Annoying Things Not To Say To A Type 1 Diabetic

10 Annoying Things Not To Say To A Type 1 Diabetic

Marianne Nykjaer personal stuff - randomness 6 Comments As you may or may not know, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the fall of 2014 ( you can read my story here ). The past year has been a crazy rollercoaster both physically and emotionally, and one of the things Ive had to learn how to deal with (well, stil learning how to deal with it actually) is that everybody seems to have an opinion, yet very few people know what theyre actually talking about. I cant say I really blame them, as I didnt really know much about it untiI actually got this illness myself, and I know that a lot of people genuinely mean well but that doesnt change the fact that its quite annoying (not to mention sometimes downright rude and offensive). So heres a list of 10 things all type 1 diabetics are tired of hearing Next time you meet someone dealing with this, please refrain yourself from any of these comments ;). Have you tried **? It can cure diabetes! The ** is usually some type of food (eating babanas. Eating figs. Eating cinnamon. Eating only raw vegetables.) or drink (drinking water with salt) or activity (working out). Honey there are hundreds, maybe thousands of people looking for a cure for diabetes. There is no cure at the moment, only ways to manage it. Trust me on this one. I mean think about it: I dont particularly enjoy having this disease, so if there was curedont you think Id already be doing it? My grandma had diabetes. She lost her leg and died. Thank you for your kind words of encouragement. I feel so warm and fuzzy inside now. You have to give yourself insulin injections every day? OMG that would SO not be for me, Id die haha! Well, I would actually die if I didnt do it. Again: Im not doing this because I enjoy it. I dont particularly like giving myself injections 4-5 Continue reading >>

What Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes And/or An Eating Disorder

What Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes And/or An Eating Disorder

What Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes and/or an Eating Disorder Knowing how to talk to someone struggling with a serious mental illness such as an eating disorder, or even an individual with just type 1 diabetes alone can be a minefield for family and friends. Both conditions are regarded as invisible illnesses that are often misunderstood. Innocent comments can quite easily be taken the wrong way entirely. My eating disorder will reframe and misconstrue anything it can potentially collude with and use against me. You somehow become psychic and can read minds. Its often the case that I know I am being duped but Ill gladly fall head first down that rabbit hole. So that said, these are gentle suggestions of what not to say to someone with an eating disorder, type 1 diabetes or a comorbidity of the two. Mostly those flippant remarks that that cant be caught until they are said out loud and then realisation hits. But sometimes it can be ignorance, it can be frustration and anger and shock tactics, none of which work but all of which are born from desperation. I hope this might be of use to individuals in a supporting position for someone who is ill. Often the way our minds twist things can make absolutely no sense. These pointers are devised through not just my own experience but that of other eating disorder sufferers I know of, voices from some of my close friends, some that I have met in treatment settings, and also members of the diabulimia online Facebook community. Please feel free to add any others you think are important via our social media pages and share this with your spouse, parents, siblings, your best friend or anyone you think might find them to be of use. My personal commentary is in bold 1. Try to avoid diet talk. Yes, sadly its normal. Its mess Continue reading >>

Top 10 Typical Responses When You Tell Someone You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Typical Responses When You Tell Someone You Have Diabetes

People with diabetes struggle with many things, but one of those things is the frank and sheer stupidity of some people when it comes to diabetes. Not only that, but some people without diabetes can be downright insensitive and rude to those people who do have diabetes. Lately, I think most people who are called “diabetic” would prefer the term Person with Diabetes, or PWD. After all, they are a person first, and a “diabetic” second. They have feelings, and they are great in numbers. Some articles, like a recent one in the New York Times, says that diabetes is on the decline for the first time in decades. You can read the full article here: New Diabetes Cases, at long last, begin to fall in the United States. iSince we all could use a little more awareness and sensitivity to what it means to be a Person with Diabetes, let’s look at the top 10 responses when you tell someone you are a person with Diabetes. Let’s see why these are some pretty insensitive responses. What might be some better responses to have for a Person with Diabetes? We will look at that also, after this… You Don’t Look Diabetic! What do you exactly mean by that? What is a person with diabetes supposed to look like? Should I be thin, or fat, or in between? In fact I could be any of those things. No one is immune to diabetes anymore. Haven’t you heard it’s an epidemic? A thin person could be a Type 1 PWD. A thin person could be a Type 2 PWD who has some visceral fat, or fat around the pancreas. Someone who is at a normal weight can have Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes. Someone who is overweight can have Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes. Someone who is young can have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, and someone who is older can have Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes. So how do suppose a “diabetic” looks? He Continue reading >>

5 Ignorant Things You Should Never Say To People With Type 1 Diabetes

5 Ignorant Things You Should Never Say To People With Type 1 Diabetes

5 Ignorant Things You Should Never Say To People With Type 1 Diabetes Waking up every day and being part of America's population of type 1diabetics brings its own unique and rare challenges to day-to-day life. Wether it's taking shots five times a day or dealing with the highs and lows of our blood sugars and emotional state, it can be exhausting. But on top of that, we as a community must defend our own disease more than you think. See, we share a medical term with another disease, type 2 diabetes, which is completely separate from us. But, that form of diabetes hasthe biggest stigma and notoriety. Personally, I don't think there's been a time when I haven't had to explain the difference between type 1 and type 2 to people. It's sad. I'm practically begging people to understand that what I have is an autoimmune disease that I did nothing to spark. No matter how much salad I eat or how much I exercise I do, I will never be able to be free from this burden like people with type 2 can. That's why I have stayed quiet for most of my life about my disease. I get the same questions over and over again. Here are five ofthe worst things you cansay to someone with type 1 diabetes: Hell yeah, I can. What people don't understand about type 1 is that we can eat whatever we like, as long as we check our blood sugar and take our insulin. We are normal people who just have to take a couple extra precautions, and asking why we aren't limiting ourselves is insinuating that we aren't allowed to live normal lives. It's type 2 diabetics who must carefully watch what they eat so they can become healthier and eventually reverse their diagnosis. Thisis something I cannot do. So yeah, I can have a piece of cake. 2. "OMG, I'm afraid of needles. How do you take shots?" Well for starters, I do i Continue reading >>

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

They mean well. They really do. But many people just don’t realize that the seemingly “helpful,” reassuring, or casual, off-hand remarks they make upon learning that your child has type 1 diabetes just…aren’t. And who can blame them? They probably know as much about type 1 as you did before your son or daughter was diagnosed. Still, some of the comments T1D parents hear can be supremely frustrating or even downright hurtful. So here’s your chance to set these well-intentioned friends, family members and acquaintances straight — by sharing this list as a public service announcement or by picking up some ideas for clever, tactful ways to respond when you hear one of these doozies, courtesy of Jeniece Trast, R.N., C.D.E., M.A., clinical research nurse manager and certified diabetes educator at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. 1. “Well, at least it’s not fatal.” This type of statement minimizes all the work parents do to manage their child’s diabetes — and ignores the fact that many parents do worry very much about their child’s long-term health and safety. “Diabetes is a challenging disease to manage because it involves food, insulin, blood sugar monitoring, exercise and so much more,” says Trast. “People who are able to manage their diabetes well are usually healthy individuals who lead long successful lives. However, there is always the risk of low and high blood sugars no matter how well controlled a person’s diabetes is, and both of these things can be life-threatening if not properly treated.” Parents, consider responding: “I am so glad that my child is happy and healthy right now. However, diabetes unfortunately can cause medical emergencies that can be very dangerous, so we work hard every day to try to prevent those. Continue reading >>

The Stupid Things People Say About Diabetes And How To Deal With It

The Stupid Things People Say About Diabetes And How To Deal With It

WRITTEN BY: Marci Thiessen Editor’s Note: Marci is a part of Beyond Type Run Team, which is sponsored by Medtronic. She is participating in the 2017 TCS New York City Marathon. Why can’t I just be like everyone else for one moment? Why can’t I just indulge in a good hearty meal without spiking or crashing? Why can’t I just go for a jog or jet off on vacation without packing my “essentials,” arranging back-up plans and constantly making sure my numbers stay within range? A night’s rest without any beeping, buzzing or alerts would be a dream. This is physically, mentally and emotionally exhausting. Why do I have to be so different from everyone else? Just because my pancreas tapped out, I am automatically seen as “different.” I’m the butt of all diabetic jokes. I’m the mystery girl walking around with an invisible disease that 99% of the general public misunderstands and confuses with Type 2. I’m the oddball at the table that immediately gets heckled for being gluten-free, vegan or a “health freak.” Some days I wish I could just blend in and not have someone sticking their nose into my health problems. Some days I wish I could enjoy one meal without someone drawing attention to the fact that I’m a diabetic with comments like, “Can you eat that?” or “What’s going to happen if you do?” or when witnessing an injection or bolus, “Oooh, I’m going to pass out.” Sometimes, it’s okay to make jokes about it and laugh it off. Other times, it just gets old. I’ve heard just about every silly comment you could throw my way. For all my T1D’s out there, living with this “invisible disease,” these are some of my favorites: The Stupid Things People Say… So, with diabetes are you going to lose your feet? My grandpa’s brother got b Continue reading >>

8 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

8 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

8 things you should never say to someone with type 1 diabetes There are many misconceptions about diabetes, which means people with type 1 diabetes are often asked a lot of insensitive questions. Here are eight things you should never ask or say. When people find out that you have type 1 diabetes , they tend to ask a lot of questions. Generally, this is a good thing as it creates greater awareness. Unfortunately, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are still poorly understood by the average person, meaning that people with diabetes tend to get asked a lot of inappropriate and insensitive questions. As someone with type 1 diabetes, Health24s Laura Newnham is no stranger to these kinds of comments and questions. Here are the eight things she is most tired of hearing: 1. Did you get diabetes from eating too much sugar? This kind of blame-game statement may not only make someone with type 1 feel like having the condition is somehow their own fault, it is also untrue. Type 1 diabetes is not caused by poor eating habits, it is actually an autoimmune condition. This means that the bodys own immune system turns on itself and attacks the pancreas, destroying the cells that produce insulin. This eventually leads to type 1 diabetes. It is not preventable and currently cannot be cured. 2.How can you have diabetes, you arent fat? Unlike type 2 diabetes, developing type 1 diabetes has nothing to do with being overweight. Prior to being diagnosed, one of the main symptoms of type 1 diabetes is unexplained weight loss, and this may actually prompt them to seek medical attention. 3. My moms aunt had diabetes and she had to have her leg amputated. This is something that no one with diabetes wants to hear. Yes, the reality is that diabetes is one of the leading causes of amputations globally Continue reading >>

10 Things Not To Say To Someone With Diabetes

10 Things Not To Say To Someone With Diabetes

Having diabetes, it’s not unusual to come in contact with someone who is misinformed about this disease. I, for one, did not know anything about type 1 diabetes prior to being diagnosed. I try to keep this in mind when I hear ignorant comments that may be well intentioned. While someone may just be unaware, some comments can even come off as rude or insensitive. A lot of the misinformation about diabetes comes from the media. It’s hard to tackle the misconceptions out there but I do my best to educate those around me. I have to admit, there’s days where I’m just frustrated with diabetes that an ignorant comment is the last thing I want to hear. It’s those times where I feel blessed to have a community that understands. Here is 10 Things NOT to Say to Someone With Diabetes: 1. Should you be eating that? (I’m just going to continue eating because I either bolused already or I’m low). 2. You don’t look diabetic Okay?…. 3. It could always be worse Gee thanks! 4. If you diet and exercise it will go away Sorry, but diet and exercise won’t fix my broken pancreas. 5. Did you eat too much sugar as a kid? (I’m just going to pretend like you didn’t just ask that). 6. My grandma has diabetes and lost her leg Thanks, that’s exactly what I needed to hear. 7. How do you inject yourself? I could never do that.. It’s simple.. it’s either life or death. 8. I heard cinnamon can cure diabetes Really?! If that were true then I wouldn’t have diabetes right now. 9. Do you have the bad kind? How is there a good kind? 10. Shouldn’t you have this disease all figured out? If only… What other comments do you hear a lot? Post below. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes