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What Not To Say To A Type 1 Diabetic

What Not To Say To Someone With Diabetes

What Not To Say To Someone With Diabetes

What Not to Say to Someone With Diabetes How You Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, According to Experts Should you be eating that? Andrea Braverman, 57, who has Type 1 diabetes, has heard that commentand many more. People say, If you didnt eat so much sugar, you wouldnt have diabetes, or Controlling your diet and exercise will cure your diabetes. You get frustrated, you get angry, you feel intruded upon, says the professor of psychiatry at Thomas Jefferson University. You feel judged. In fact, a 2016 survey conducted by Wakefield Research reported that 76 percent of people with diabetes have felt judged by family members or friends for how they manage their diabetes, while over half felt frequently judged. Follow these guidelines to show your support. Diabetes Is More Complicated Than You Know In general, people know a lot more about diabetes than they did 30 years ago, says John Zrebiec, director of behavioral health at Joslin Diabetes Center, so they feel more qualified to comment than ever before. But reading an occasional news story doesnt make you an expert. Diabetes is very complex and very confusing, he says. People can do everything right but still get blood sugar [results] that make no sense. People who dont have diabetes think if you do everything right, it should turn out right. But that isnt always true. Lifestyle fixes are only one part of a larger picture, says Susan Guzman, co-founder of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where people have little to no pancreatic function, and Type 2 is based on a lot of factors that arent in our controlgenes and the environment and even climate change, she says. In other words, your judgmental comments may be way off the mark. People with diabetes can internalize your negative message Continue reading >>

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

11 Things Not To Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

1. There is no "mild form" of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is when the body doesn't produce any insulin, while type 2 diabetes is when the body doesn't make enough insulin or the insulin it does make doesn't work properly. There's a myth that type 2 is the milder form – but it's false. "It is a commonly held belief that type 2 is the mild form and less serious than type 1 diabetes. This is in fact not true, as both type 1 and 2 diabetes can lead to serious health problems such as blindness, amputation, kidney disease, heart disease, and stroke, if not managed well. "Type 1 diabetes can be sudden onset, where a person may become quite unwell very quickly, whereas type 2 diabetes can go undetected for a number of years. Both types of diabetes need to be treated as soon as possible to avoid diabetes-related complications." – Deepa Khatri, clinical adviser, Diabetes UK 2. You don't get it from "eating too much sugar". "I didn't get it from eating too much sugar. There's nothing I can't eat or drink. And type 1 and type 2 are two completely different conditions. There's two types, I'm talking about type 1, the autoimmune condition. There's nothing I did to get it, there's nothing I could have done to prevent it, and it's not contagious. "No, it's not because I ate too much sugar as a kid, and yes, I can still eat that bit of cake. I can eat anything I want, and I can do pretty much what I want when I want to do it – my T1 doesn't hold me back in any way. It's a lot more than just taking a couple of insulin injections though – there's a lot more to it." – Connor McHarg 3. And it's a serious illness. "One of my major frustrations is that people tend not to view diabetes as a 'serious' illness and will go as far to say that it's self-inflicted due to certain lifestyle ch Continue reading >>

What Not To Say To Someone With Type 2 Diabetes

What Not To Say To Someone With Type 2 Diabetes

Most of us whove had diabetes for a while have at least a couple of well-meaning people in our lives who like to talk to us about our condition the aunt who sneaks in comments about how we should be caring for ourselves, or a friend who always brings up the latest new item they read online saying we could cure our condition by simply doing x, y, or z. If youre one of those well-meaning friends or family, I urge you: please keep your comments to yourself. Because if you dont have diabetes, you have no idea what its like to keep up with taking medication, getting enough exercise, following a specific diet, and crunching blood glucose numbers every single day. And just as I would never make recommendations about your arthritis medication or your glasses prescription, you really shouldnt offer your thoughts on my medical condition. Please understand, this is not just a trivial matter or a pet peeve. While, yes, it is highly annoying, more importantly, it can foster stigma around having diabetes. Too many well-meaning comments can send some people with type 2 into a spiral of shame and self-blame which can lead to self-sabotaging behavior. For example, for some with diabetes, knowing that a loved one is scrutinizing their weight can send them straight to the bottom of a carton of ice cream. So what are some of these well-meaning triggers? Youre going to eat that? This is probably the most common offender. Diabetes is unique to each person who has it. For some of us, a slice of bread is a no-no; for others, an occasional dessert works fine with the rest of our diet plan. Would you monitor someone elses blood pressure before they add salt to a steak? Im guessing not. So, please, back off and trust that we understand our meal plan. And even if we are making a poor decision at Continue reading >>

7 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

7 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

7 Things You Should Never Say to Someone with Type 1 Diabetes Medically reviewed by George Krucik, MD on October 21, 2015 Written by The Healthline Editorial Team If you have diabetes, you know that what others say about your health isnt always right. And, not to mention, type 1 and type 2 diabetes are oftentimes confused for one another. Your family and friends may think their words of wisdom are helpful, when theyre really hurtful. We asked people who are living with type 1 diabetes to share the most bothersome or annoying things people they know have said about the disease. Heres a sampling of what those people said and what they couldve said instead. One of the biggest misunderstandings about type 1 diabetes is what causes it. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 isnt caused by environmental factors like high cholesterol levels, obesity, or a sedentary lifestyle. The exact causes of type 1 diabetes are unknown. Its best not to guess or make assumptions about your friends health history. Do your research, and ask them questions if they seem open to it. Type 1 diabetes affects the pancreas and blood glucose levels, not body weight. Dont be surprised if your friend can outrun you on the track: They may be in better shape than you, despite having type 1. Meal planning is top priority for someone living with type 1 diabetes. Something as simple as going out for ice cream after dinner or grabbing popcorn at the movie theater can wreak havoc on your friends glucose levels. While you certainly dont need to manage your friends eating schedule, a friendly reminder if you have that type of relationship can show that you care. With more than 1.25 million Americans living with the disease, type 1 diabetes isnt something to be ashamed or embarrassed about. If your friend doesnt think Continue reading >>

What Not To Say To A Type 1 Diabetic

What Not To Say To A Type 1 Diabetic

I think by this point I have heard every response, every reaction, and every sympathy, and these are the things I would suggest not bringing up to any type 1 diabetics. They are: These responses are along the lines of, "Did you eat too much sugar?" "So you can't eat any sugar now right?" or my personal favorite that my brother used to get was, "But you don't look fat." I hate that type 2 diabetes is advertised and better known that type 1. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic, lifelong, devastating, autoimmune disease that has no known cause or cure at this time. It cannot be fixed by some diet and exercise. Type 1 diabetes is a lifestyle. It consumes your life because it factors into every decision you make. So no, this didn't happen to me for any known reason. I'm sorry that my pancreas is stupid and doesn't work any more, but there is nothing anyone could have done to prevent it. I understand that you are showing respect and sympathy, but whatever it is that I have to do that you "couldn't" is just a cop-out. If I couldnt give myself a shot, check my blood sugar, or live this lifestyle, I would die. So you may say that, but thats just not how life works. I didnt want to do any of the things that I have to do as a type 1 diabetic, but I do it anyway, because there is no alternative. Im not saying that no one can complain about anything in my presence. Even I complain a lot about things that are unimportant. But there are certain times when I just cant stand to hear others complaints. Oh, youre tired because you stayed up late? Im sorry, but Im tired too because I was up all night being my pancreas. Youre thirsty, OK, but you dont know the meaning of thirsty until youre number spikes up into the 300s and youre four hours into a hike and it's about 100 degrees out and youre ou Continue reading >>

Top 29 Most Annoying Things To Say To People With Diabetes

Top 29 Most Annoying Things To Say To People With Diabetes

Before I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I didn’t know anything about the disease. I might have also said something thoughtless out of pure ignorance. That’s what I try to remind myself when a non-diabetic (or maybe even a diabetic) says something to me about diabetes that is rude, annoying, or even offensive. These comments often stem from a simple lack of knowledge, being misinformed by general media, sometimes thoughtlessness and lack of consideration, and sometimes even fear. While I try to remind myself to be patient with a person’s lack of knowledge around diabetes, and that I believe it’s important that I try to kindly educate and teach those people (so they don’t repeat the same comments to someone else), those comments can still get old, hurt your feelings, make you laugh, and frustrate you to no end. This list is about knowing you’re not alone, and you’re not the only one who has been on the receiving end of these comments. The top 29 most annoying things to say to people with any type of diabetes: My grandma had diabetes. She lost her leg, then she died. (Thank you, that’s inspiring!) You’ll die if you eat sugar, right? You have diabetes? You don’t look that fat. (Gee, thanks….) You take insulin? Oh, you must have the bad kind of diabetes. (Really? What’s the good kind?) Your child has diabetes? Did they get it because you fed them too much candy? Oh my god, you have to take shots every day? I’d die if I had to do that. (Well, I’d die if I didn’t.) Doesn’t that hurt? (Um, yeah, it’s a sharp object going into my body. Duh!) Well, that sounds better than something like leukemia. Oh my god, can you eat that? You can’t eat that! That’s the disease that causes you to lose your legs, right? I heard you can cure that with di Continue reading >>

10 Annoying Things Not To Say To A Type 1 Diabetic

10 Annoying Things Not To Say To A Type 1 Diabetic

Marianne Nykjaer personal stuff - randomness 6 Comments As you may or may not know, I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in the fall of 2014 ( you can read my story here ). The past year has been a crazy rollercoaster both physically and emotionally, and one of the things Ive had to learn how to deal with (well, stil learning how to deal with it actually) is that everybody seems to have an opinion, yet very few people know what theyre actually talking about. I cant say I really blame them, as I didnt really know much about it untiI actually got this illness myself, and I know that a lot of people genuinely mean well but that doesnt change the fact that its quite annoying (not to mention sometimes downright rude and offensive). So heres a list of 10 things all type 1 diabetics are tired of hearing Next time you meet someone dealing with this, please refrain yourself from any of these comments ;). Have you tried **? It can cure diabetes! The ** is usually some type of food (eating babanas. Eating figs. Eating cinnamon. Eating only raw vegetables.) or drink (drinking water with salt) or activity (working out). Honey there are hundreds, maybe thousands of people looking for a cure for diabetes. There is no cure at the moment, only ways to manage it. Trust me on this one. I mean think about it: I dont particularly enjoy having this disease, so if there was curedont you think Id already be doing it? My grandma had diabetes. She lost her leg and died. Thank you for your kind words of encouragement. I feel so warm and fuzzy inside now. You have to give yourself insulin injections every day? OMG that would SO not be for me, Id die haha! Well, I would actually die if I didnt do it. Again: Im not doing this because I enjoy it. I dont particularly like giving myself injections 4-5 Continue reading >>

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

They mean well. They really do. But many people just don’t realize that the seemingly “helpful,” reassuring, or casual, off-hand remarks they make upon learning that your child has type 1 diabetes just…aren’t. And who can blame them? They probably know as much about type 1 as you did before your son or daughter was diagnosed. Still, some of the comments T1D parents hear can be supremely frustrating or even downright hurtful. So here’s your chance to set these well-intentioned friends, family members and acquaintances straight — by sharing this list as a public service announcement or by picking up some ideas for clever, tactful ways to respond when you hear one of these doozies, courtesy of Jeniece Trast, R.N., C.D.E., M.A., clinical research nurse manager and certified diabetes educator at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. 1. “Well, at least it’s not fatal.” This type of statement minimizes all the work parents do to manage their child’s diabetes — and ignores the fact that many parents do worry very much about their child’s long-term health and safety. “Diabetes is a challenging disease to manage because it involves food, insulin, blood sugar monitoring, exercise and so much more,” says Trast. “People who are able to manage their diabetes well are usually healthy individuals who lead long successful lives. However, there is always the risk of low and high blood sugars no matter how well controlled a person’s diabetes is, and both of these things can be life-threatening if not properly treated.” Parents, consider responding: “I am so glad that my child is happy and healthy right now. However, diabetes unfortunately can cause medical emergencies that can be very dangerous, so we work hard every day to try to prevent those. Continue reading >>

10 Things Not To Say To A Person With Diabetes

10 Things Not To Say To A Person With Diabetes

Every person with diabetes has one: a story of a diabetes-related comment they received that completely left them reeling. There are memes and videos dedicated to these comments. The wise folks at Behavioral Diabetes Institute even made pocket-sized etiquette cards you can hand out to try to save people from their own big mouths. And you’d think it would all be enough to maybe keep people from making hurtful, embarrassing, and woefully misinformed comments to people with diabetes – but from my own life experience, it’s not. So here it is: 10 Things Not to Ask of or Say To, About, or Around a Person with Diabetes. 10. “Gross.” Listen, I know. No one hates the invasive nature of diabetes more than people with diabetes themselves. The poking, the bleeding, the alcohol-swabbing, the insertion of metal objects into subcutaneous tissue. But we do it to survive, and when you call us out for disturbing your delicate sensibilities when we’re just trying to juice up for a slice at the local pizzeria, it’s not helping anyone. Maybe just look away, or go get another beer. Cheers! 9. “Are you well controlled?” I used to think it was just weird primary care physicians who asked this question, but a fellow person with diabetes actually posed this query to me at a barbeque a few weeks ago. First of all, “well controlled” is different for everyone. Second of all, none of your beeswax. And third of all, if I say “no,” what kind of question are you going to ask me next? Let’s talk about the weather, shall we? 8. “Aren’t you worried about having kids?” Yes! The price of higher education is insane! Bullying in schools! Sleepless nights and breastfeeding drama! Climate change and – oh, you’re talking about diabetes? Well, yeah. Probably every person with Continue reading >>

10 Things You Need To Know About People With Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things You Need To Know About People With Type 1 Diabetes

1. They’re not Diabetics anymore. They are People With Diabetes. Calling them Diabetic is akin to calling someone a retard. They’re in a lifelong struggle to define themselves in any other way but diabetic. 2. People with Type 1 Diabetes can’t make Insulin. Insulin, in people without diabetes, is a hormone made in the pancreas. It allows glucose in the bloodstream to enter red blood cells for use in the body as energy. 3. Excess glucose in the bloodstream damages body systems and is the root of diabetic complications. Having too much, or too little glucose in the blood is dangerous and can ultimately cause death. Keeping blood glucose levels within normal levels is the ultimate goal of people with diabetes but can be affected by food, exercise, illness, stress, and a whole bunch of other annoying, unpredictable events. 4. They are not allergic to sugar. They balance what they eat by testing their blood glucose levels and taking insulin through injections. Yes, injections and finger pricks often hurt. Insulin does not come from animals or other people. It is genetically engineered using the E. coli bacteria and is biosynthetic. 5. Type 1 Diabetes is occurs when the Islets of Langerhans (insulin-producing cells in the pancreas) are attacked by the body. A lot of people ask why people with diabetes can’t get Islet Transplants. This is a relatively new therapy but requires massive doses of antiretroviral medications, which often have worse effects than living with diabetes. 6. Nobody understands why their bodies attack themselves. They did not get diabetes from their mothers who gained too much weight during pregnancy, from eating too much sugar, from exercising infrequently or from any other known reason. Not to be confused with Type 2 Diabetes. 7. They hate it whe Continue reading >>

Most Annoying Things People Say To You Or Your Children With Diabetes

Most Annoying Things People Say To You Or Your Children With Diabetes

We asked 100 people what the absolute strangest and most comical thing that someone has said to them about their child’s diabetes, and the responses… well most of us have heard many quite the odd ones as well. But please remember, not everyone is aware, and we should try to be patient with them and use this as an opportunity to help educate them. With all that said, it’s still fun to talk about it! You can also read our Top 10 Typical Responses People Give When You Tell Them You Have Diabetes great piece written by Elizabeth. Santanyia Rodabaugh: Are you allergic to a lot of foods? Is that the bad kind? Did you eat alot of sugar as a kid? Diana Burton: My brother told me once I was “Diabetic by design” Kelly Davis: Brown sugar is great for diabetics because it’s brown and therefor more natural. Tara Pfromm: My son is T1: An 80+ year old friend told me that her son had the “sugar” when he was little and she just gave him lots of love and it went away. Someone else said to give my son mega doses of green tea because in India they don’t have T1 because of all the green tea they drink. Another person couldn’t believe that we would give our child insulin because that will just make his pancreas lazy and not produce any on his own. It’s just the pharmaceutical companies pushing drugs. Anna Lee Buck Combs: My cousin once watched me draw up insulin in a syringe, got a queasy look on her face, and asked, “Doesn’t that hurt?” Because I hadn’t actually stabbed the pointy thing into my skin yet, I replied, “Well not yet!” And then another cousin and I laughed. Phoebe Nelson: “But you’re in such good shape!” Glenda Gilbert Strickland: A friend once asked who in my family had T1D. I told her that my maternal grandfather had it, my brother had i Continue reading >>

Six Things Not So Say To Parents Of Children With Diabetes

Six Things Not So Say To Parents Of Children With Diabetes

People generally mean well but sadly many just dont think before they open their mouths. I therefore thought that it might be a good idea to create a little list for them of thing that you really should NOT ever NEVER say to parents of children with diabetes. Consider it a personal service announcement if you will Really? Seriously? Because we know that you injecting your cats fur with insulin is really identical to chasing a toddler around the room with a syringe, pinning them down and explaining that you are stabbing them for the fourth time today because you love them. Yes, I am sure they are exactly the same. Thank you. I needed to hear that. I have guilt on top of guilt about not protecting my child from this disease and you tell me that your 90 year old aunt died because of diabetes? Odds are that she had Type 2 diabetes and at 90well her odds werent the greatest for lasting long anyway but yeah, I can see where I needed to know this. This is why parents of children with diabetes have bruises on their heads. They spend a lot of time banging it against a wall in frustration. . Dont worry. I am sure that your child will grow out of it. The odds of my child outgrowing their diabetes are lot less likely than as you overcoming your ignorance of what type 1 diabetes really is. Nope, growing out of diabetes is not an option. My childs pancreas is just no longer doing its job. We have tried everything we could to revive it but its dead. Gone. No functioning beta cells to produce insulin. No hope. On the upside, I would really encourage you to do a bit of Googling or even ask some questions of me and then listen. Truly listen to what I will tell you and you might be surprised at what you can learn. Your ignorance can be cured! Perhaps if you hadnt given your child so much Continue reading >>

Diabetes Etiquette: What To Say And What To Keep To Yourself

Diabetes Etiquette: What To Say And What To Keep To Yourself

Show friends and family members with diabetes you care by following this simple diabetes etiquette guide. Developed by William Polonsky, Ph.D., CDE, president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute, these "diabetiquette" tips show you 10 ways to support and encourage a loved one who has diabetes. DO realize and appreciate that managing diabetes is hard work. Diabetes management is a full-time job that your loved one didn't apply for, didn't want, and can't quit. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much to eat, while also factoring in exercise, medication, stress, blood sugar monitoring, and so much more -- each and every day. Just being aware of this can help you be more understanding. From our readers: "My family encourages me when they know I'm not feeling well and need a little extra help." -- Denise Feller, PWD type 2, from Peoria, Illinois. DON'T offer unsolicited advice about nutrition or other aspects of diabetes. You may mean well, but giving advice about someone's personal habits isn't kind -- especially when the advice is not requested. Besides, many of the popularly held beliefs about diabetes (for example, "you should just stop eating sugar") are outdated or just plain wrong. From our readers: "It makes me angry when people who know nothing about diabetes tell me what I should and shouldn't eat." -- Kelsey Bodenhamer, PWD type 2, from Tulsa, Oklahoma. DO offer to join in making healthy lifestyle changes. Offer to partner with your loved one in efforts to change, such as starting an exercise program. It's one of the most powerful ways you can help. After all, a healthy lifestyle benefits everyone! From our readers: "My coworkers go for walks with me over our lunch breaks. They cheer for me when I lose a little weight, and ask me what my blood sugars Continue reading >>

10 Things Not To Say To Someone With Diabetes

10 Things Not To Say To Someone With Diabetes

Having diabetes, it’s not unusual to come in contact with someone who is misinformed about this disease. I, for one, did not know anything about type 1 diabetes prior to being diagnosed. I try to keep this in mind when I hear ignorant comments that may be well intentioned. While someone may just be unaware, some comments can even come off as rude or insensitive. A lot of the misinformation about diabetes comes from the media. It’s hard to tackle the misconceptions out there but I do my best to educate those around me. I have to admit, there’s days where I’m just frustrated with diabetes that an ignorant comment is the last thing I want to hear. It’s those times where I feel blessed to have a community that understands. Here is 10 Things NOT to Say to Someone With Diabetes: 1. Should you be eating that? (I’m just going to continue eating because I either bolused already or I’m low). 2. You don’t look diabetic Okay?…. 3. It could always be worse Gee thanks! 4. If you diet and exercise it will go away Sorry, but diet and exercise won’t fix my broken pancreas. 5. Did you eat too much sugar as a kid? (I’m just going to pretend like you didn’t just ask that). 6. My grandma has diabetes and lost her leg Thanks, that’s exactly what I needed to hear. 7. How do you inject yourself? I could never do that.. It’s simple.. it’s either life or death. 8. I heard cinnamon can cure diabetes Really?! If that were true then I wouldn’t have diabetes right now. 9. Do you have the bad kind? How is there a good kind? 10. Shouldn’t you have this disease all figured out? If only… What other comments do you hear a lot? Post below. Continue reading >>

8 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

8 Things You Should Never Say To Someone With Type 1 Diabetes

8 things you should never say to someone with type 1 diabetes There are many misconceptions about diabetes, which means people with type 1 diabetes are often asked a lot of insensitive questions. Here are eight things you should never ask or say. When people find out that you have type 1 diabetes , they tend to ask a lot of questions. Generally, this is a good thing as it creates greater awareness. Unfortunately, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are still poorly understood by the average person, meaning that people with diabetes tend to get asked a lot of inappropriate and insensitive questions. As someone with type 1 diabetes, Health24s Laura Newnham is no stranger to these kinds of comments and questions. Here are the eight things she is most tired of hearing: 1. Did you get diabetes from eating too much sugar? This kind of blame-game statement may not only make someone with type 1 feel like having the condition is somehow their own fault, it is also untrue. Type 1 diabetes is not caused by poor eating habits, it is actually an autoimmune condition. This means that the bodys own immune system turns on itself and attacks the pancreas, destroying the cells that produce insulin. This eventually leads to type 1 diabetes. It is not preventable and currently cannot be cured. 2.How can you have diabetes, you arent fat? Unlike type 2 diabetes, developing type 1 diabetes has nothing to do with being overweight. Prior to being diagnosed, one of the main symptoms of type 1 diabetes is unexplained weight loss, and this may actually prompt them to seek medical attention. 3. My moms aunt had diabetes and she had to have her leg amputated. This is something that no one with diabetes wants to hear. Yes, the reality is that diabetes is one of the leading causes of amputations globally Continue reading >>

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