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What Not To Eat If You Are Prediabetic?

Healthful Eating To Prevent Diabetes

Healthful Eating To Prevent Diabetes

All foods provide calories and affect blood glucose levels. There are no "good" or "bad" foods. Eating a variety of foods can improve your health and keep meal time interesting. Tip Choose carbohydrate foods that are high in fiber, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes (navy, kidney and black beans, lentils, etc.). Fiber: slows digestion to help you feel fuller longer slows the rate carbohydrates are absorbed into your bloodstream helps reduce cholesterol by binding to the cholesterol in your digestive tract and getting rid of it Spreading out your meals and snacks helps you manage your blood glucose levels. Try to eat main meals at least four hours apart. Wait about two hours between a meal and a snack, if you eat snacks. The foods you eat fall into three main food groups: carbohydrates, protein and fat. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates provide your best energy source. All carbohydrate foods turn into glucose. Carbohydrate foods are breads, crackers, cereals, rice, pasta, fruit and fruit juice, milk, vegetables and sweets. It is important that you don't avoid carbohydrate foods. They should make up 50 to 60 percent of your food plan. Carbohydrate counting Carbohydrate counting is a way to help you manage the amount of carbohydrate foods you eat during the day. A carbohydrate choice is a serving of carbohydrate food that contains about 15 grams of carbohydrate. The following chart gives general guidelines for carbohydrate choices at each meal. You may need to eat more or less, depending on your personal goals. To lose weight To control weight For the very active Women 2 to 3 choices (30 to 45 grams) 3 to 4 choices (45 to 60 grams) 4 to 5 choices (60 to 75 grams) Men 3 to 4 choices (45 to 60 grams) 4 to 5 choices (60 to 75 grams) 4 to 6 choices (60 to 90 grams) Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat?

What Should I Eat?

People with diabetes should follow the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Eating the recommended amount of food from the five food groups will provide you with the nutrients you need to be healthy and prevent chronic diseases such as obesity and heart disease. Australian Dietary Guidelines: To help manage your diabetes: Eat regular meals and spread them evenly throughout the day Eat a diet lower in fat, particularly saturated fat If you take insulin or diabetes tablets, you may need to have between meal snacks It is important to recognise that everyone’s needs are different. All people with diabetes should see an Accredited Practising Dietitian in conjunction with their diabetes team for individualised advice. Read our position statement 'One Diet Does Not Fit All'. Matching the amount of food you eat with the amount of energy you burn through activity and exercise is important. Putting too much fuel in your body can lead to weight gain. Being overweight or obese can make it difficult to manage your diabetes and can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and cancer. Limit foods high in energy such as take away foods, sweet biscuits, cakes, sugar sweetened drinks and fruit juice, lollies, chocolate and savoury snacks. Some people have a healthy diet but eat too much. Reducing your portion size is one way to decrease the amount of energy you eat. Being active has many benefits. Along with healthy eating, regular physical activity can help you to manage your blood glucose levels, reduce your blood fats (cholesterol and triglycerides) and maintain a healthy weight. Learn more about exercise and maintaining a healthy weight. Fats have the highest energy (kilojoule or calorie) content of all foods. Eating too much fat can make you put on weight, which may make it more diffi Continue reading >>

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

Diabetes: More Than Just Sugar Overload?

I walk every day, eat a healthful diet, and have no diabetes in my immediate family. I'm not model skinny (truth be told, I've been known to pack on a few extra pounds), but I'm certainly not a couch potato or junk food addict. So, imagine my surprise when a routine blood test showed that my blood sugar was elevated and I was officially prediabetic. Prediabetic, meaning I have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that put me at risk of developing diabetes, the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States. Yikes! The fact that I'm not alone doesn't make me feel any better -- 57 million Americans have prediabetes and another 24 million have diabetes (90 to 95 percent of all diabetes diagnosed is type 2, which typically appears in adults and is associated with obesity, physical inactivity, family history, and other factors). Being part of what's shaping up to be a diabetes epidemic in America isn't a club I want to join. Health.com: How to lower your risks for developing diabetes Another wake-up call It turns out that prediabetes isn't really "pre" anything, according to Mark Hyman, M.D., author of "UltraMetabolism" and "The UltraMind Solution: Fix Your Broken Brain by Healing Your Body First." "It's a danger in and of itself that sets off a whole cascade of problems," he says. In fact, there's now evidence that a prediabetic patient's risks for eye, kidney, and nerve damage, as well as heart disease, are nearly as great as a diabetic's, says Alan J. Garber, M.D., chairman of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists task force that's currently writing new guidelines for managing prediabetes. What's more, diabetes can be especially dangerous for mothers and their unborn children, potentially leading to miscarriage or birth defects. Women with diabetes a Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

Skip the sugary sodas and processed food, and opt for whole foods like fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado, Experts believe the number of people living with diabetes will rise dramatically over the next 40 years. If current trends continue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as one in three adults could have the disease by 2050. And about 79 million American adults now have prediabetes, a condition marked by above-normal blood sugar levels that aren't high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. If there's a silver lining to these alarming statistics, it's that there's plenty you can do to prevent the disease or slow the progression, including eating a balanced diet. Everyone can benefit from a healthy eating plan aimed at containing prediabetes, regardless of whether you're at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, says Barbara Borcik, RD, a certified diabetes eductor at the Diabetes & Nutrition Center at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Md. 7 Golden Rules of Healthy Eating Here are seven sound diet principles that can keep your blood sugars from creeping upward, among other health benefits. Skip the sugary drinks. No sweet tea. No juice. No soda. No sweetened lemonade. No mocha latte coffee creations. "My number one recommendation to people is: Don't drink your sugar," Borcik says. Sugary drinks provide nothing more than empty calories, and they won't help you feel full. "All the sugary drinks out there are a real risk factor for obesity," she stresses. Pull back on portions. You still can eat many of the foods you like, just have smaller amounts of them, Borcik says, adding that this is especially true for starchy foods like white rice, white potat Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

I’m Pre-diabetic. Now What?

I’m Pre-diabetic. Now What?

So you just got back from the doctor, and your blood work didn’t look good. Your fasting glucose was 110: not diabetic, but not normal either. Your triglycerides were 195, your HDL cholesterol was 35, and your blood pressure has crept up to 130/90. Despite repeated warnings from your doctor, your waistline has continued to expand, maybe partly because you can’t find time to exercise, and you find it nearly impossible to go much more than a day without sweets or snacks of some kind. If you look back at my first post on prediabetes, you’ll see that elevated blood glucose, high triglycerides, low HDL, moderately high blood pressure, and a growing waistline are all potential indicators of a steady march towards diabetes. However, steady does not mean inevitable. It is well within your power to reverse this process, especially now, before actual diabetes kicks in. Your first step should be to get moving. You don’t need to join a gym or become a triathlete to get the benefits of exercise. In fact, the first thing you need to do is stop sitting still. If you ordinarily sit at a desk for hours at a time, working or just surfing the web, get up and move around every hour or so. The more vigorously you move around, the better: Climb the stairs a couple of times, or just get your blood moving. Same thing if you’re a couch potato: Hit the pause button, or use commercial time to move around. If people ask what you’re up to, tell them you’re trying to be more active to get in better health. There’s every chance they’ll (secretly) admire you, and they may even be brave enough to admit they would like to do the same thing. Of course, it also helps to get regular exercise, and it’s hard to beat walking for convenience. Walking daily, or even most days of the week, is Continue reading >>

A Diabetic & Prediabetic Diet Ultimate Faq

A Diabetic & Prediabetic Diet Ultimate Faq

According to a 2011 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are 25.8 million people, or over 9% of the U.S. population that are affected by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. For those with diabetes, it's necessary to follow a diabetic or prediabetic diet depending upon whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes respectively. This diet takes into account your health and ensures you eat only foods that will help to improve your blood sugar control and insulin sensitivity. Here are some of the most Frequently Asked Questions about a diabetic and prediabetic diet:​ Q: What is a Diabetic Diet? A: A Diabetic Diet is one that helps to control your blood sugar levels by eating primarily low-carb foods. A good diabetes diet plan involves plenty of: The diet should steer clear of: It's actually a fairly simple diet plan to follow, once you understand which foods are good for your blood sugar levels and which aren't. Q: Is it different from a Prediabetic Diet? A: A Prediabetic diet focuses mostly on weight loss, while a Diabetic Diet focuses primarily on blood sugar control. The foods promoted as "healthy" are fairly similar with both diets. The primary difference is the Prediabetic Diet is designed to combat body fat as well. That's not to say a Diabetic Diet can't be effective for weight loss. The foods you eat are mostly low in calories, sugar, and fat, so you may be able to see effective weight loss over the course of your Diabetic Diet. Q: How many carbs per day on a Diabetic Diet? A: The amount of carbohydrates you consume on your Diabetic Diet will be determined by your: The larger and more active, the more carbs you need. The smaller and more sedentary, the fewer carbs required for healthy body function. All of this information will be provided by Continue reading >>

What I Eat In A Typical Day, As A Prediabetic

What I Eat In A Typical Day, As A Prediabetic

Almost two years ago, I went to the doctor and was diagnosed with type 1 prediabetes. Basically, I had to learn how to maintain a prediabetic diet, on a low-carb, low-sugar diet, and I have to test my blood glucose levels every day. Although it was difficult at the beginning, adjusting to a low-carb and low-sugar diet has been very manageable and beneficial for my overall health. As a college student, I’ve established a pretty consistent plan for what I eat on a day-to-day basis to keep myself healthy and wanted to share for all of my fellow prediabetics, diabetics, any anyone who just wants to read. Breakfast: Eggs & Turkey Bacon Breakfast is my personal favorite meal of the day, and I love starting the day off with something protein-packed and filling. Every morning, I eat scrambled eggs and turkey bacon for breakfast. I've found that they're the perfect low-carb foods to fuel my body for a long day ahead. Lunch: Veggie Burger & Veggies After class, I’m feeling pretty tired and definitely in need of more protein to get me through hours of homework and studying. So for lunch, I like to include protein in my meal. Typically, I'll have a veggie burger. My obsession in the dining hall are the Dr. Praeger Kale Burgers. If not, I’ll eat a piece of grilled chicken for protein and have veggies on the side or add it to a salad. #SpoonTip: Carbs are not just found in bread and pasta. Fruits and veggies have carbs too. I love adding chickpeas to my salads and meals for a healthy carb source. They fill me up and don’t mess with my blood sugar. Snack: Apple An apple is a perfect snack when I need an energy pick-me-up. Apples are a simple and easy go-to snack. Although they have sugar, the sugar in apples are natural and diabetics should not be afraid to eat them. Dinner: G Continue reading >>

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Table of Contents Simple Steps to Lower Your Risk Introduction If type 2 diabetes was an infectious disease, passed from one person to another, public health officials would say we’re in the midst of an epidemic. This difficult disease, once called adult-onset diabetes, is striking an ever-growing number of adults. Even more alarming, it’s now beginning to show up in teenagers and children. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3) The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure among adults. It causes mild to severe nerve damage that, coupled with diabetes-related circulation problems, often leads to the loss of a leg or foot. Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., directly causing almost 70,000 deaths each year and contributing to thousands more. (4) The good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. About 9 cases in 10 could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Our cells depend on a single simple sugar, glucose, for most of their energy needs. That’s why the body Continue reading >>

What To Eat

What To Eat

Whether you’ve got prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, it’s important to have a well-balanced diet. Weight Watchers and the SmartPoints® plan can help with that, but here are the basics: Eat a variety of foods, including veggies, whole grains, non-fat dairy, healthy fats, and lean proteins. Choose lean protein (skinless chicken or turkey, lean ground beef, fish, shellfish, egg whites, lowfat/nonfat dairy, tofu) Grab whole grains (look for items like wild rice, brown rice, quinoa, oats, millet, buckwheat noodles) Go for fresh fruit What To Limit Eating Limit your intake of sugary drinks like fruit drinks, and regular soft drinks. Limit your intake of carbs and starchy veggies. Not sure what to look for? Here’s a list when you grocery shop: Go easy on starchy vegetables (like potatoes, plantains, parsnips, pumpkin, squash, beans, and legumes) and increase non-starchy veggies (like lettuce, asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, spinach, mushrooms, onions, peppers and tomatoes) Eating Tips Be aware of portion sizes. This is a tough one, but we have great tips and hacks (like using your hand to estimate portions) to help! Try not to eat too much of any one type of food. Space meals evenly. Never skip meals. Learn how Weight Watchers program can help those with prediabetics. Get more info about what to eat at diabetes.org. Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

How To Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

Expert Reviewed In the past 30 years, the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes has skyrocketed to such an extent that it is now viewed as an epidemic in the western world. From being a once fairly mild and rare ailment of the elderly to becoming a chronic disease, this type of diabetes affects people of every age, race, and background, and is now a major modern cause of premature death in many countries around the world. Someone dies from Type 2 Diabetes every 10 seconds worldwide.[1] Happily, there is a great way to prevent Type 2 Diabetes: establish and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Basics Of Healthy Eating For Diabetes Or Pre Diabetes-spanish

Diabetes: Basics Of Healthy Eating For Diabetes Or Pre Diabetes-spanish

The information provided should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited. View Fullscreen Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diet: The Ultimate Plan To Avoid Diabetes

Prediabetes Diet: The Ultimate Plan To Avoid Diabetes

Want to avoid diabetes? Here's an easy-to-follow healthy eating plan that can help without making you feel deprived. If you’ve been diagnosed with prediabetes, it’s time to find a healthy, realistic eating plan—one you can follow for life—to prevent or at least delay the onset of diabetes and related health conditions such as cardiovascular and kidney diseases. Each year, up to 10% of people who are diagnosed with prediabetes go on to develop diabetes. But just as many get their blood sugar levels back to normal. How it turns out for you may depend, in great part, on lifestyle choices you make, including how you eat. For many people with prediabetes, preventing diabetes means losing weight. Your goal now is to eat balanced meals and snacks that not only improve your glucose metabolism but also help you get to and maintain a healthy weight, if you’re not already there. According to the American Diabetes Association, losing just 7% of your body weight can lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. That’s just 15 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds; 10 or 11 pounds if you currently weigh 150 pounds. A diet to prevent diabetes is good for the whole family, so there’s no need to buy and prepare special foods just for one person. Just like anyone else who wants to be healthy, you need to avoid (or at least greatly limit) all the usual sugary and fatty junk food suspects: cakes, candies, sodas, pastries, and chips, along with deep-fried foods, cold cuts, heavy sauces and gravies and flavored coffee drinks. Overall, being on a prediabetes diet simply means paying attention to portion sizes and nutritional balance. While some food choices are better than others, you have a lot of leeway and few restrictions on a prediabetes diet. The good news is you can choose whet Continue reading >>

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Save for later Although we know fruits and vegetables are good for us people with diabetes are often told they can’t eat fruit because they are too sweet or contain sugar. All fruits contain natural sugar, but also contain a good mix of vitamins, minerals and fibre. Why are fruit and vegetables so good for us? Eating fruits and vegetables lowers the risk of developing many health conditions including high blood pressure, heart diseases, strokes, obesity and certain cancers. It’s even more important for people with diabetes to eat more fruits and vegetables as most of these conditions are more likely to affect them. Fruits and vegetables have a good mix of soluble and insoluble fibre which is good for your bowels and general health – so it makes sense to eat more of them Should people with diabetes cut back on fruit because of sugar content? Managing diabetes has to do with managing your blood glucose, blood fats, blood pressure and your weight, and fruits and vegetables can play a positive role in all these. The concern has been that because fruits contain sugar, it makes your blood glucose go up. In fact, most fruits have low to medium glycaemic index, so they do not lead to a sharp rise in your blood glucose levels compared to other carbohydrate containing foods like white or wholemeal bread. Portion size is very important when considering the biggest effects on your blood glucose levels so let’s look at this in more detail. A portion of fruit contains about 15-20g carbohydrate on average, which is similar to a slice of bread. To put things in perspective, just a can of cola contains 35g carb and a medium slice of chocolate cake contains 35g of carbs as well. So, if you are looking to reduce your carb intake, with the aim to manage blood glucose levels, the ad Continue reading >>

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