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What Not To Eat If You Are Prediabetic?

20 Ways To Halt Pre-diabetes In Its Tracks

20 Ways To Halt Pre-diabetes In Its Tracks

Learn how small changes in your daily routine may help ward off type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease, and one that can be a challenge to manage. It can lead to heart and kidney disease, blindness and many other health conditions. Until a cure is found, people with the disease have to watch what they eat, measure their blood sugar and take medication each day. Am I at-risk? 86 million people in the U.S. have pre-diabetes, and even more are at-risk. Pre-diabetes is when blood glucose levels are above normal, but not high enough to be in the diabetic range. But, people with pre-diabetes are already at a higher risk for heart disease and other complications. You are at an increased risk for type 2 diabetes if you: Are overweight Exercise fewer than three times each week Have a family history of diabetes Are African-American, Hispanic, American-Indian or Pacific Islander Are older than 45 Had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) Have high blood pressure or cholesterol Have a history of heart disease Small changes, big rewards Pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes can often be prevented. And it does not require a complete overhaul of your lifestyle. Research shows that reducing your body weight by 5 percent to 10 percent – 10 to 20 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds – can cut your diabetes risk in half. Weight loss can also delay the onset of diabetes. Reduce your risk The key to stopping type 2 diabetes is to reach a healthy weight. And the trick to long-lasting weight loss is a healthy diet and regular exercise. Exercise Work up to 30 to 60 minutes of exercise most days of the week. Always check with your doctor before you start an exercise program. Consider these exercise tips to get started: Exercise does not have to happen all at once. Continue reading >>

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For Prediabetes

Diet Tips For Prediabetes

In a person with prediabetes, blood sugar levels are raised but not yet to within the ranges of diabetes. Although not a lot is known about how many people have prediabetes, one study found that the condition affects 1 in 3 adults in the UK. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the same prediabetes rates affect Americans. Without treatment, an estimated 15-30 percent of those with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes 5 years after diagnosis. Many prediabetes prevention plans revolve around two key lifestyle factors - a healthy diet and regular exercise. The results of the Diabetes Prevention Program, run in the United States since 2001, suggest that losing an average of 15 pounds in the first year of a prediabetes prevention plan reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent over 3 years. Researchers from John Hopkins University also found that a combination of diet and exercise help. When both were used to achieve a total body weight loss of 10 percent or more in the first year of a prevention plan, the risk of type 2 diabetes fell by 85 percent within 3 years. Contents of this article: The prediabetes diet There are a few different ways to plan a prediabetes diet. The Mayo Clinic suggests diets filled with low-fat, low-calorie, high-fiber, foods. That means lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and protein-packed legumes. It also means avoiding artificial sugars, added sugars, and fats. To help guide meal plans, the Glycemic Index (GI) is a useful tool. It ranks foods by the rate at which they affect blood sugar levels. Some carbohydrates are digested slowly, gradually releasing sugar into the bloodstream. Others are processed quickly, causing a quick rise in blood sugar levels. Because prediabetes pr Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: The Hidden Health Risk You Can Avoid

Prediabetes: The Hidden Health Risk You Can Avoid

So what is prediabetes? It’s not an illness, but it is serious. Prediabetes simply means that your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for you to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. You may also hear it called impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose regulation or borderline diabetes, but what they all mean is that the level of sugar in your blood indicates you have a significantly increased risk of going on to develop type 2 diabetes. I just need to cut back on sugar, don’t I? Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes are not, as many believe, caused by eating too much chocolate or sweet, sugary foods – though too many of these can lead to weight gain, which does increase your risk. Sugar is just one type of carbohydrate, along with foods like bread, pasta, potatoes and fruit. When these foods are digested they are changed into a type of sugar called glucose, so blood glucose levels rise naturally after eating carbohydrates. The condition of prediabetes is the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as weight and activity levels. There are no symptoms You won’t know you have prediabetes unless your blood glucose levels are tested because, unlike diabetes, there are no symptoms. This makes it even more important to be aware of the risk factors and see your doctor if you are at high risk. Like type 2 diabetes, your risk of prediabetes is higher if you’re over 40 – or over 25 if you’re black or South Asian. Other risk factors are the same as for type 2 diabetes – being overweight, having a close family relative (parent or sibling) with type 2 diabetes, having high blood pressure, having had a heart attack or stroke, having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) together with being Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diet: The Ultimate Plan To Avoid Diabetes

Prediabetes Diet: The Ultimate Plan To Avoid Diabetes

Want to avoid diabetes? Here's an easy-to-follow healthy eating plan that can help without making you feel deprived. If you’ve been diagnosed with prediabetes, it’s time to find a healthy, realistic eating plan—one you can follow for life—to prevent or at least delay the onset of diabetes and related health conditions such as cardiovascular and kidney diseases. Each year, up to 10% of people who are diagnosed with prediabetes go on to develop diabetes. But just as many get their blood sugar levels back to normal. How it turns out for you may depend, in great part, on lifestyle choices you make, including how you eat. For many people with prediabetes, preventing diabetes means losing weight. Your goal now is to eat balanced meals and snacks that not only improve your glucose metabolism but also help you get to and maintain a healthy weight, if you’re not already there. According to the American Diabetes Association, losing just 7% of your body weight can lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. That’s just 15 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds; 10 or 11 pounds if you currently weigh 150 pounds. A diet to prevent diabetes is good for the whole family, so there’s no need to buy and prepare special foods just for one person. Just like anyone else who wants to be healthy, you need to avoid (or at least greatly limit) all the usual sugary and fatty junk food suspects: cakes, candies, sodas, pastries, and chips, along with deep-fried foods, cold cuts, heavy sauces and gravies and flavored coffee drinks. Overall, being on a prediabetes diet simply means paying attention to portion sizes and nutritional balance. While some food choices are better than others, you have a lot of leeway and few restrictions on a prediabetes diet. The good news is you can choose whet Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

Despite conventional wisdom, a diabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you have to commit to a bland and boring diet. There are loads of delicious foods that are safe and healthy to eat—you may just not know what they are yet. But that’s okay, because we’re here to help! Read on to discover the best and worst drinks, grains, proteins, and produce picks for your diet, according to top nutritionists. Once you’ve read through the list and added some things to your shopping list, click over to these 15 Cooking and Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes to find out how to transform the Eat This picks into delicious, satisfying meals. According to the American Diabetes Association, it’s important to choose the most nutritious whole grains possible. Although grains help to maintain steady blood-sugar levels and provide heart-healthy fiber, white flour-based products can’t claim the same. Because the bran, germ, and endosperm have been compromised, these foods elevate blood-sugar levels and should only be consumed on occasion. “Oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan, which seems to have an anti-diabetic effect,” explains Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN, author of The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook., adding,* “I advise people with diabetes to steer clear of added sugars by enjoying savory rather than sweet oatmeal.” For some tips on whipping up a delectable bowl of oats, dig into these 20 Savory Oatmeal Recipes for a Flat Belly. Though you likely assumed sugary donuts and muffins weren’t the best way to kick off your day, we bet you didn’t realize just how awful certain pastries can be. “Cinnamon rolls, for example, can contain more saturated fat and added sugars than people with diabetes should have in an entire day,” cautions Newgent. Yikes! Always turn down t Continue reading >>

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

Changing the Path to Type 2 A whopping 86 million Americans have prediabetes. That’s according to the latest statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- that's 37 percent of American adults over age 20 and 51 percent of adults over age 65. Research shows about 70 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes over time. Despite these scary stats, only 11 percent of people who have prediabtes know it. The good news is you can prevent or slow the progression of prediabetes to type 2. Numerous research studies conducted over the last 30 years show that early and aggressive management with continued vigilance over time is what prevents or delays type 2 diabetes. And the earlier you detect it and put your plan into action, the better. Here are eight ways to manage prediabetes. 1. Get Tested to Know for Sure. Do you have family -- parents or siblings -- with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes? Are you carrying extra weight around your middle? Don't get enough exercise? These are a few of the risk factors for prediabetes. A good first step to see if you are at high risk is to use the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. You can take the test by visiting diabetes.org/risk. If you’re at high risk, schedule an appointment with your health care provider to get a check of your blood glucose level -- or, better yet, your A1C (an average of your blood glucose over two to three months). See the blood test results to diagnose prediabetes on the next page. 2. Max Out Your Insulin-Making Reserves. It's well known that at the center of the storm of the slow and steady onset of prediabetes is insulin resistance -- the body's inability, due to excess weight and genetic risk factors, to effectively use the insulin th Continue reading >>

Should You Follow A Prediabetes Diet Plan?

Should You Follow A Prediabetes Diet Plan?

Before I offer answers to the questions about what to eat if you have pre diabetes and whether you should follow a pre diabetes diet plan, let’s get clear on what pre diabetes is, who’s at risk and actions to take that can help prevent type 2 diabetes. What is Pre Diabetes? Pre diabetes occurs when blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.1 (Pre diabetes refers to the condition that typically occurs before one develops type 2 diabetes.) The number of people estimated to have pre diabetes is simply staggering. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) puts the estimate at 84 million Americans. That’s one out of three adults at risk for diabetes! Most people don’t know they have pre diabetes because often there are no symptoms, nor have they been tested for it or told they have it.1 November is American Diabetes Month®. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) now recommends that all adults over 45 years of age be screened for pre diabetes.2 Other risk factors for pre diabetes or type 2 diabetes include being overweight or obese, having one or more parents or siblings who have or had type 2 diabetes or women who have had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy).2 Pre Diabetes Tests According to the ADA, any of the following lab tests with the corresponding results can be used to diagnose pre diabetes:2 Fasting Blood Glucose: 100-125 mg/dL 2 hours after the start of an oral glucose tolerance test: 140-199 mg/dL A1c test (A1c approximates an average of all the ups and downs of blood glucose over the previous two to three months): 5.7 to 6.4 percent People can develop pre diabetes and have it for several years or more before blood glucose levels rise high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Basics Of Healthy Eating For Diabetes Or Pre Diabetes-spanish

Diabetes: Basics Of Healthy Eating For Diabetes Or Pre Diabetes-spanish

The information provided should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited. View Fullscreen Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diagnosis?

Prediabetes Diagnosis?

Turn things around before diabetes occurs In 2012, 86 million Americans over age 20 had prediabetes – a nearly 9 percent increase over 2010 stats, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you’re among the 86 million with prediabetes, you need to know there are steps you can take to manage your condition and avoid developing type 2 diabetes. The risks are real Prediabetes occurs when your fasting blood glucose, or sugar, level is above normal. Prediabetes can progress to type 2 diabetes, in which the body does not produce or use enough of the hormone insulin to turn glucose into energy. Diabetes is linked to high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, nerve damage, eye problems and other serious health conditions. “One of the biggest things to remember with prediabetes is that it does not automatically turn into type 2 diabetes or heart disease,” explained Novant Health Diabetes Center Diabetes Educator Cathy Thomas, MSN, RN, CDE. People with prediabetes are definitely at a much higher risk of developing either one or both, though. People with prediabetes have nearly double the risk of developing cardiovascular disease than people with normal glucose levels. And those who have diabetes have a two to four times greater risk of cardiovascular disease. “The risks are very real, especially if you ignore your diagnosis,” Thomas said. “But there’s no reason to panic. Prediabetes acts as a really good early warning system for the body, signaling people to make some lifestyle changes to avoid more serious conditions.” An “early warning system” “I found out about my prediabetes two years ago when I was diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which puts me at greater risk for diabetes,” said Regan White, 33, Continue reading >>

Here Are Some Recommendations For Building Your Prediabetes Plan.

Here Are Some Recommendations For Building Your Prediabetes Plan.

Learning you have prediabetes can be frightening. But if you make a few basic diet and exercise changes, you can get your blood sugar levels back down to normal and prevent the progression to type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not high enough to qualify as type 2 diabetes. To be diagnosed with prediabetes, you must have: A fasting blood glucose—a measure of how much sugar (or glucose) is in your blood after a period of fasting—of 100 to125 mg/dL A two-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) blood glucose of 140 to 199 mg/dL; this test gauges how your body breaks down sugar while drinking a sugar-based beverage over a two-hour period. Hemoglobin A1C of 5.7 to 6.4 percent; this is a measure of your average blood sugar level over three months. Twenty-five percent of people with prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within three to five years, and that percentage continues to rise with time. But making a few simple tweaks to your diet, getting regular physical activity and achieving and maintaining a healthy weight (which the first two should help with) can not only prevent the progression of prediabetes to type 2 diabetes, it can also drop elevated blood sugar levels back to normal. In fact, the American Diabetes Association estimates that you can cut your risk for type 2 diabetes by nearly 60 percent by simply incorporating 30 minutes of moderate exercise five days a week and by losing 7 percent of your body weight (that’s only 14 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds). Fight prediabetes with a two-pronged approach: Exercise There are two main forms of exercise, and both help with prediabetes. Make sure to incorporate aerobic exercises, such as brisk walking, swimming, water aerobics, and even seasonal ac Continue reading >>

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a serious medical condition that puts you at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is also very treatable, and if you have it, there is a good chance you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by making changes in your diet and increasing your level of physical activity. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body does not produce or use enough insulin to be able to turn glucose into energy. Glucose is the sugar and starch that comes from the food you eat, which fuels your body. Insulin is a hormone that carries glucose from your blood into your cells. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood and can cause serious health problems. Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is when your fasting blood glucose (blood sugar) level is above normal. To test for pre-diabetes, your doctor will take a sample of your blood after you have fasted overnight: Normal fasting glucose: 60 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) Pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose): 100 to 125 mg/dl Diabetes: 126 mg/dl or higher on 2 occasions Healthy Tips for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes If you have pre-diabetes, you should talk to your doctor about developing a lifestyle plan to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends increased physical activity and, if you are overweight, losing 5-10 percent of your body weight. Your doctor may also want you to take medication if you have a family history of diabetes, you are obese, or have other cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or a history of heart disease). Below are tips to help you keep pre-diabetes from progressing to Type 2 diabetes: Exercise Every Day Since muscles use glucose for energy, activities like walking, bicycling, and gardening Continue reading >>

22 Things Every Pre-diabetic Should Do To Avoid Diabetes

22 Things Every Pre-diabetic Should Do To Avoid Diabetes

Are you dreaming off what should a pre-diabetic do to avoid diabetes, You should improve your body's resistance to insulin by adopting a insulin resistance diet, Most of us do not know diabetes is not a disease - it is a metabolic disorder, you can keep your body's metabolism in order by doing few things like loosing excess body weight & fat, keeping stress away and Eat healthy. I know What are you thinking now !! Every one say life style changes and diet are very important in managing or preventing diabetes,,, but no one says how to do it in simple steps Dont get upset in this article I will brief you what should a pre-diabetic do to avoid diabetes in 10 simple steps. If you are determined to keep diabetes far away from your life - Follow these steps, And if you are not motivated enough you should read this article How to Motivate yourself to fight against Diabetes just like Kamal Hassan, Halle Berry & Sonam Kapoor I think you are motivated enough now So let us See the - 22 things Every prediabetic should do Daily What should a prediabetic do to avoid Diabetes 1. Start your day with psyllium husk : This Word Psyllium Husk may sound new to you, But it is proven to fight constipation very well and also has blood sugar regulating properties and works well in lowering cholesterol levels. This psyllium husk is available in medical stores and also online. In India it is mostly available in the name of Isabgol . You can soak 4-5 grams of psyllium husk in 300 ml of water overnight and drink it in the morning. You can also take it with water. You need to understand one thing while you drink it in the morning it is in semi solid state so be careful it does not choke you. To avoid choking you should ensure water and psyllium husk ratio is appropriate as recommended. psyllium husk Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

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