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What Month Is National Diabetes Awareness Month?

National Diabetes Awareness Month 2017

National Diabetes Awareness Month 2017

According to the American Diabetes Association, someone is diagnosed with diabetes every 21 seconds. Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels resulting from problems with insulin production or problems with insulin action. Insulin is a hormone made by your body to use and store energy from food. The main energy source is glucose from carbohydrate foods. Type 1 diabetes means that your body does not make enough insulin, from a genetic or autoimmune cause. Type 1 diabetes is less common (about 5% to 10% of cases). Type 2 diabetes is 90% to 95% of cases. This is when insulin does not work normally, and blood glucose levels are often higher or lower than the normal range. This can increase your risk of heart attack or stroke and could lead to kidney failure and/or blindness, if not well managed. Q: What affects blood glucose? Food. Carbohydrates raise blood glucose but still provide healthy energy, vitamins and minerals. Eating the same amount of carbohydrates at the same time each day can help blood glucose stay stable. The most nutritious sources of carbohydrates are grains (bread, pasta, and rice), fruit, milk & dairy (like yogurt), beans and starchy vegetables (Potatoes, corn and peas). Sweets like soda, cookies and candy are also carbohydrate sources that should be limited. Talk to your doctor or dietitian to determine what the right amount of carbohydrate is for you. People with diabetes need different amounts depending on a variety of factors. Activity. Be active for 30 minutes at least 5 days per week. Try aerobic activity and strength building exercises. Stress. Stress increases blood glucose. Find ways to help yourself reduce stress, like deep breathing, and taking quiet time for yourself. Medication. Diabetes pil Continue reading >>

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

With November being National Diabetes Awareness Month in the U.S., you can imagine there’s a slew of awareness campaigns and fundraising events that go on throughout the month. This effort has taken on more international importance in recent years, with the growth of global observances of World Diabetes Day that takes place annually on November 14, the date marking the birthday of insulin co-discoverer Dr. Frederick Banting. Here at DiabetesMine, we’ve covered these November diabetes activities at length over the years. Please browse through this overview of posts we’ve written to get a sense of what happens when diabetes awareness becomes a national and international priority. Diabetes Awareness Month 2017 This year, we believe the need for diabetes awareness month is more important than ever. Many different diabetes organizations have a plethora of activities and initiatives, including the American Diabetes Association and JDRF that are both emphasizing the "invisible illness" aspect of living with diabetes. Our roundup explores all of the happenings within the USA and across the world. Diabetes Months of the Past Don’t miss our coverage of what happened for Diabetes Awareness Month last year, in both the U.S. and across the globe. You’ll read about efforts from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), JDRF, Diabetes Hands Foundation, and other groups working to raise public awareness and make a difference for the Diabetes Community. You can also reflect back on the prior year, with our coverage of Diabetes Awareness Month 2015, when both the ADA and IDF focused on the theme of educating people about healthy eating. World Diabetes Day and the Blue Circle World Diabetes Day (WDD) was established by the International Di Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. The Wound Healing Center at Wood County Hospital is participating in the Healogics National Diabetes Campaign by educating the community on the relationship between diabetes and the increased risk of chronic wounds. Approximately 29.1 million people living with diabetes in the United States, and nearly 28 percent are undiagnosed. Of those 29.1 million, about 25 percent will eventually develop a foot ulcer. If left untreated, these ulcers can impair quality of life and even lead to an amputation. Early detection and intervention can help reduce this risk. Recommendations to help prevent diabetic foot ulcers: Stop smoking immediately Undergo comprehensive foot examinations each time you visit your healthcare provider Perform daily self-inspections of the feet or have a family member perform the inspection Choose proper, supportive footwear (shoes and socks) Take steps to improve circulation with healthy eating and regular exercise Proper wound care is crucial in healing diabetic foot ulcers. The Wound Healing Center at Wood County Hospital offers state-of-the-art technology treatment options including hyperbaric oxygen therapy and specialized wound care therapies. These specialized treatments include casting for offloading, compression therapy cellular tissue placement and negative pressure wound vacs to aid in wound closure, new tissue growth, wound tissue regeneration and much more. Contact The Wound Healing Center to learn about diabetic foot ulcers or if you have a wound that will not heal. To schedule an appointment, please call (419) 373-7680 or visit Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Awareness Month: 10 Ways To Get Involved, 425 Million Reasons To Care

National Diabetes Awareness Month: 10 Ways To Get Involved, 425 Million Reasons To Care

Those of you who live with or work in diabetes probably know that November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. In fact, today - November 14 - is World Diabetes Day! Each year during this month and in particular on this day, the community comes together to bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of people in the United States and around the world. Through advocacy and awareness events, programs, and initiatives, the diabetes community aims to bring attention to the severity of the problem. Together, we can fight to slow the growth and reduce the impact of this global epidemic. How can you make a difference? Join us in observing National Diabetes Awareness Month by getting involved in one of these efforts: Post about National Diabetes Awareness Month on social media using hashtags #NDAM and #DiabetesAwarenessMonth. Beyond Type 1 has some great suggestions for this! Participate in the American Diabetes Association’s National Diabetes Month campaign, which reminds us that a hero lies inside everyone affected by this disease. Write a letter to Diabetes and post it on social media using #DearDiabetes. Practice self-management with these tips about how to observe National Diabetes Month as someone living with it. Sign up for Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly’s campaign to help people with diabetes and their loved ones get smarter about heart health at ForYourSweetHeart.com. Share Virta Health’s moving video about how shame affects people living with type 2 diabetes. Download In Your Own Words, a collection of letters by people with type 2 diabetes who have written back to their younger selves to share personal insights and to reflect on their experiences of living with diabetes. What would you write in your #LettersToMyYoungerSelf? Create your T1D Footprint Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. Communities and organizations throughout the country observe National Diabetes Awareness Month to bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. November also means it's Thanksgiving time. Living with diabetes can be challenging to manage every day, but there’s no reason for diabetes to wreck Thanksgiving dinner. You can find many recipes and helpful hints for diabetic care online and in the media throughout the month. For many with diabetes, common Thanksgiving recipes pose a problem, but we have some healthier recipes to keep tradition alive. Thanksgiving dinner features classic holiday foods like stuffing, turkey, and pie. Since turkey is low-carb lean protein, it’s often on the “should eat” list. Seniors living with diabetes can enjoy their Thanksgiving dinner traditions using recipes for healthier versions of classic dishes. Even if you can't be with your senior on Thanksgiving, there are ways to celebrate. If a senior is far from family or friends on Thanksgiving, prepare a turkey breast and small side servings instead. This keeps the tradition alive without exacerbating feelings of loneliness or creating excessive leftovers. For diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving recipes and tips for using leftovers, sign up for ClearCare's free Marketing Monthly program and download November's articles. Continue reading >>

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

November is National Diabetes Month. Here’s to managing your diabetes for a longer, healthier life. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can really reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes the difference: eating a healthy diet, being physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track. The Basics More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant, which can put the pregnancy and baby at risk and lead to type 2 diabetes later). With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; about 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future. More than 30 million US adults have diabetes—and 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. At least 1 out of 3 people will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Medical costs for people with diabetes are twice as high as for people without diabetes. Risk of death for adults with diabetes is 50% higher than for adults without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Continue reading >>

November Marks National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Marks National Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes is a chronic disease that increases the risk for many serious health problems, including severe gum disease. November is Diabetes Awareness Month, and it’s a great time for us at Clayton and Canby Dental, PC to remind our patients that the way you care for your teeth at home doesn’t just affect your oral health; keeping your mouth healthy is vital to your overall health, too. Diabetes is the result of a deficiency, or lack of the hormone insulin to properly transport glucose (blood sugar) to the cells throughout the body. According to the American Diabetes Association, the most common types of diabetes are Type One (90-95 percent of cases), Type Two (five percent), and gestational or pregnancy diabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes have a 35 to 60 percent chance of developing diabetes, mostly Type Two, in the ten to 20 years following their pregnancy. In the past decade, researchers have found links between periodontal (gum) disease and diabetes. Not only are people with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease, but diabetes may also have the potential to affect blood glucose control, as well as contribute to the advancement of diabetes. Nearly 26 million Americans currently live with the disease, with an additional 79 million in the pre-diabetes stage. There is some good news we want you to know, however; you can protect your gums and teeth from the effects of diabetes by visiting our Northampton office for an exam. Patients who are living with diabetes may require more often visits to ensure their dental health remains in tip-top shape. Many insurance plans provide expanded benefits for diabetic patients, and Drs. James E Clayton Jr., Boriana Canby, Geri Kleinman, Claire Edwards can tell you how often you need to come in for an appointment. For Continue reading >>

November Marks National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Marks National Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes is a chronic disease that increases the risk for many serious health problems, including severe gum disease. November is Diabetes Awareness Month, and it’s a great time for us at Alan P. Nohr DDS and Associates to remind our patients that the way you care for your teeth at home doesn’t just affect your oral health; keeping your mouth healthy is vital to your overall health, too. Diabetes is the result of a deficiency, or lack of the hormone insulin to properly transport glucose (blood sugar) to the cells throughout the body. According to the American Diabetes Association, the most common types of diabetes are Type One (90-95 percent of cases), Type Two (five percent), and gestational or pregnancy diabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes have a 35 to 60 percent chance of developing diabetes, mostly Type Two, in the ten to 20 years following their pregnancy. In the past decade, researchers have found links between periodontal (gum) disease and diabetes. Not only are people with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease, but diabetes may also have the potential to affect blood glucose control, as well as contribute to the advancement of diabetes. Nearly 26 million Americans currently live with the disease, with an additional 79 million in the pre-diabetes stage. There is some good news we want you to know, however; you can protect your gums and teeth from the effects of diabetes by visiting our Redmond office for an exam. Patients who are living with diabetes may require more often visits to ensure their dental health remains in tip-top shape. Many insurance plans provide expanded benefits for diabetic patients, and Dr. Alan Nohr can tell you how often you need to come in for an appointment. For more information on how we can help, please do not hesitat Continue reading >>

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month, and much government and media attention is focused on the need to slow the growing “epidemic” of diabetes and prediabetes in the United States. Efforts to this end include the American Diabetes Association’s Stop Diabetes campaign, which encourages people to take an online risk test to assess their personal risk of developing prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes and to see a doctor if their test results suggest a high risk. But what if you already have diabetes? Is there anything in National Diabetes Month for you? Of course there is! For people who already have diabetes, it’s as good a time as any to take a look at your diabetes management and ask yourself how things are going. Are there areas that need improvement? Are you interested in connecting with other people who have diabetes? Would you like to participate in a diabetes fundraiser? Would you like to learn something new? Here are some suggestions for making the most of a month devoted to diabetes. 1. Commit to a new healthy habit for one month. Many lifestyle habits — not just eating and exercising — can affect your general health and your diabetes management. Some may affect your blood glucose levels directly, and others may have a more indirect effect, enabling or preventing you from carrying out your daily routines, for example. Rather than choose something you feel you “should” do, pick something you feel able and willing to do. Here are some ideas: Get more sleep. Not getting enough sleep can increase insulin resistance, meaning your body requires more insulin to get glucose into your cells. This can lead to higher blood glucose levels and is believed to have other negative health effects. Inadequate sleep also tends to leave you feeling fatigued during the day Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Month

American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. One in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people. And another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news? People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes. These changes include: eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight. How can American Diabetes Month make a difference? We can use this month to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. Here are just a few ideas: Encourage people to make small changes, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Talk to people in your community about getting regular checkups. They can get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked, and ask the doctor about their diabetes risk. Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking about the importance of healthy eating and physical activity. How can I help spread the word? We’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example: Continue reading >>

Farewell, Halloween! November Is National Diabetes Month

Farewell, Halloween! November Is National Diabetes Month

It’s curious (and fitting) that National Diabetes Month should begin the day after Halloween, the most decadently sweet holiday of the year for adults and kids… basically anyone who loves a good candy bar and a costume. But as we sift through our plastic pumpkins and beloved goody bags looking for the best chocolate-coated treats, many of us may need to take a quick reality – and blood – check. Formerly known as “adult onset” or “non-insulin dependent” diabetes, type 2 diabetes is by far the most prevalent form of this condition – but the good news is, it’s also the most preventable. According to recent research, almost a tenth of the population currently has either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, even though many of those suffering with diabetes haven’t yet been diagnosed. It all comes down to insulin – our bodies’ production and usage of this uncanny substance – or lack thereof. Insulin is the hormone our bodies use to process glucose (or sugar) from carbohydrates, and pass it along, through our bloodstream, as energy to our cells. Our cells need the energy provided by various kinds of sugar, and our body needs insulin to make this happen. Insulin is produced by the pancreas, and in proper amounts, regulates our blood sugar at proper levels. However, if our body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or is insulin-resistant, it causes our blood sugar to rise to unsafe, unhealthy levels, a condition known as hyperglycemia. Typically diagnosed in early childhood, patients with type 1 diabetes don’t produce any insulin, and require insulin shots every day to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes, which affects about 90 percent of the diabetic population, is typically more manageable and usually surfaces later in life. It’s tied to a v Continue reading >>

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month

Each issue, WebMD the Magazine's "Health Highlights" focuses on a national health theme for the month with expert tips, reader comments, and eye-catching factoids. November is Diabetes Awareness month. Follow these tips to stay at your peak! 1. Say "Om" Learn to meditate to help reduce stress and improve your blood sugar levels. 2. Step Out Exercise helps keep your weight and blood sugar under control, and just about everyone can do a brisk daily walk. 3. Eat Right Follow your food plan. If you don't have one, ask your doctor about seeing a dietitian who specializes in diabetes. 4. Jet Set Before you hit the road, get a checkup, pack extra meds, and plan your doses around time zone changes. 5. Hang 10 Drop 10% of your body weight through diet and exercise. 6. Trade Up Swap saturated fats and refined sugar for healthy fats in nuts and sweet whole fruit. 7. See Clearly Diabetes complications can cause vision loss or blindness. Schedule a full eye exam at least once a year. 8. Stand Up You may not feel foot injuries, so check both feet daily for blisters, cuts, or sores. 9. Show Color Pack your plate with a palette of greens, yellows, and reds -- like spinach, squash, and tomatoes. 10. Learn More Visit WebMD's Diabetes Center for news, tips, a blood sugar tracker, and more. Tips from Adrian Vella, MD, endocrinologist, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Use the web or your smartphone to help you manage what you eat. Online tools can help you keep track of your calorie consumption, aid in meal planning, and provide important nutrition information to help you make healthy choices. Get a pedometer. People with diabetes need to exercise. For many of my patients, that means walking. Set a goal. Tips from Deborah J. Wexler, MD, assistant professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month!

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month!

While diabetes is one of the primary causes of disability and death in the U.S., you can take action to reduce the impact. And the stakes are high — uncontrolled diabetes can lead to a host of health problems, including kidney disease, nerve damage, damage to the eyes and cardiovascular disease. Currently, about one in 11 Americans have diabetes — that’s over 29 million people in this country alone. Statistics also show that at least one in three people will develop diabetes at some point in their life, and it’s been reported that one in four people aren’t even aware that they already have diabetes. In addition, another 86 million adults in the U.S. are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Risk factors include: Being overweight Being age 45 or older Having a parent or sibling with type 2 Living a sedentary lifestyle Having a history of gestational diabetes It should also be noted that medical costs for people with diabetes are twice as high as for people without diabetes. But there is some promising news! Although there is currently no cure, if you are at high risk for type 2 diabetes, you can lower their chances of developing it by more than half by making healthy changes. These changes include increasing physical activity, eating healthier and losing weight. The sooner you get tested for diabetes, the sooner you can start making improvements to your diet and lifestyle that will benefit you now and in the future. In fact, research done through the National Institute of Health Diabetes Prevention Program found that people at risk of becoming diabetic who lost at least 7% of their body weight and exercised moderately for at least 150 minutes a week reduced their risk of developing diabetes by 58% versus 31% for those who just took Metformin. Participants Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month 2017

National Diabetes Month 2017

Each November communities across the country observe National Diabetes Month to bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. Living with diabetes can be challenging to manage every day. You are the most important member of your diabetes care team, but you don’t have to manage your diabetes alone. Seek support from health care professionals, your family, friends, and community to manage your diabetes. Watch the video below, and when you’re ready learn more about managing your diabetes. Help Promote National Diabetes Month! We encourage partners, organizations, and health care professionals to use our resources and share our 2017 theme in their communities. Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

The JDRF community will be raising awareness about type 1 diabetes (T1D) throughout the month of November. We’ll kick things off on T1Day, November 1, 2017, by telling our stories to the world. Every minute of every day, people with T1D persevere in the face of adversity. JDRF is committed to making day-to-day life with the disease easier, safer and healthier while working toward ways to cure and prevent T1D once and for all. This November, we are continuing our T1D Looks Like Me campaign to spread awareness about life with T1D. Visit our website or follow us on social media to “Get Quizzed by a Whiz Kid” and test your knowledge against that of a nine-year-old with T1D. You can also create a custom “T1D Looks Like Me” profile photo for social media or generate your unique “T1D Footprint.” You can post your footprint image to Facebook, Instagram or Twitter to shed light on the cumulative burden of finger pricks, injections and other disruptions that come with living with T1D. JDRF will also continue our important advocacy efforts throughout the month. We are asking Congress to continue funding critical research through the Special Diabetes Program and pressuring insurers to guarantee that everyone has the Coverage 2 Control their T1D. Check back with us on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2017, and throughout the month for more blogs, stories and ways to share what it means to be affected by T1D. Continue reading >>

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