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What Meds Can Raise Blood Sugar?

Medicines And Type 2 Diabetes

Medicines And Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes will often need to take prescription medicines to help control their blood glucose levels. They may also need medicines to help manage other health conditions such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. People with type 2 diabetes, and their healthcare professionals, should also be aware that some medicines can cause blood glucose levels to increase or decrease and this can change the effect of any diabetes medicine. Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Did A Blood Pressure Med Raise My Blood Sugar?

Did A Blood Pressure Med Raise My Blood Sugar?

I take Amaryl for diabetes. Recently, my doctor prescribed triamterene for high blood pressure, and now my resting blood sugar is much higher. I've read the drug information, and it says that this medication "may cause high blood sugar in diabetics." In that light, why would my doctor prescribe this medication? Is it safe for me to take it? — Linda, South Carolina Neither Amaryl nor triamterene should cause a rise in glucose levels. On the contrary, Amaryl works to reduce them. Triamterene (a type of water pill), however, is often given in combination with thiazide diuretics (another type of water pill), which have the potential to mildly increase sugar levels in people who are prone to or have diabetes. Usually, the benefits of the diuretics (they control blood pressure and can stave off cardiovascular complications) outweigh the risk from the small increase in blood glucose levels. Thiazide diuretics, therefore, are administered frequently to people with diabetes. One possible step to reduce the risk of developing elevated sugar levels when taking these medications is to make sure your potassium level is within the normal limit. The combination of triamterene and a thiazide diuretic (brand names include Dyazide and Maxzide) are given often to prevent potassium from becoming low. If indeed you are taking triamterene alone, you might look for other reasons that will explain the rise in your sugar levels. Learn more in the Everyday Health Type 2 Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

Drug Induced Diabetes

Drug Induced Diabetes

Tweet A number of medications have side effects which include the raising of blood glucose levels. Drug induced diabetes is when use of a specific medication has lead to the development of diabetes. In some cases the development of diabetes may be reversible if use of the medication is discontinued, but in other cases drug-induced diabetes may be permanent. Drug induced diabetes is a form of secondary diabetes, in other words diabetes that is a consequence of having another health condition. Which drugs can induce diabetes? A number of drugs have been linked with an increased risk development of type 2 diabetes. Corticosteroids Thiazide diuretics Beta-blockers Antipsychotics Is diabetes permanent? Diabetes may not be permanent but this can depend on other health factors. With some medications, blood glucose levels may return back to normal once the medication is stopped but, in some cases, the development of diabetes may be permanent. Managing drug induced diabetes If you need to continue taking the medication that has brought on diabetes, it may make your diabetes more difficult to control than would otherwise be the case. If you are able to stop the course of medication, you may find your blood glucose levels become slightly easier to manage. Following a healthy diet and meeting the recommended exercise guidelines will help to improve your chances of managing your blood glucose levels. Can drug induced diabetes be prevented? It may be possible to reduce the risk of developing diabetes by ensuring you to keep to a healthy lifestyle whilst you are on the medication. Being on smaller doses of the medication or shorter periods of time may help to reduce the likelihood of developing high blood sugar levels and diabetes. Doctors will usually try to put you on the smallest e Continue reading >>

What Affects Blood Sugar Levels

What Affects Blood Sugar Levels

Food, exercise and medication all affect blood sugar levels Getting blood glucose levels right can prove to be difficult at times. Just when you think you've factored everything in, a high or low blood glucose level can arrive out of nowhere and really throw your confidence. These things happen to everyone with diabetes. Factoring in food, activity and medication Youll no doubt be aware that food, activity and the medication you take play a significant role in your blood sugar levels but there can be a number of other variables at work at the same time. Get an idea of the things that can lead to surprising sugar levels using the list below. Exercise or just increasing exertion can lead to altering blood glucose levels: Physical activity can affect insulin sensitivity for up to 48 hours - which can lead to lower blood sugars over this time Sugar levels can initially rise following a short burst of activity. If you usually are active most days, not doing activity could lead to higher blood sugars than usual If you exercise a muscle near where you last injected, it could cause your insulin to be absorbed more quickly Food, alcohol, tiredness and stress can all impact blood glucose levels. Many people are surprised to know that protein can affect blood sugar levels, too. Alcohol can affect sugar levels for up to several hours after stopping drinking Stress and illness can also significantly affect sugar levels Your insulin may get absorbed faster in different parts of your body Injecting into lumpy skin affects how insulin is absorbed Continue reading >>

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

When taking medicine, you must always read labeling carefully and be aware of possible side effects. When you have Type 1, you have the added consideration of how it will affect your blood glucose levels as well as any devices that you depend on for your diabetes management. And as with anything you digest, you must know the carb count, administering insulin as needed. Apart from daily medication such as birth control, having a sick-day protocal is always smart for the unexpected bug. This way, you’ll be stocked ahead of time with essentials to ease your mind and decrease additional stress over your care. Here are some must-knows about over-the-counter medication and what it means for your Type 1. Cold Medicine Being sick stresses the body, and when your body’s stressed it releases blood-glucose raising hormones. These hormones can even prevent insulin from properly lowering your levels. Consider the following when taking cold medicine: Opt for pill forms – if possible, pills over syrups are better for their lack of carbohydrates. Check for added sugars – When taking syrups, double-check the labels of over-the-counter brands to make sure they don’t have added sugar. See if there’s a sugar-free option – Though small doses of sugar don’t pose a huge risk, your safest bet is to ask your pharmacist about sugar-free syrups. Check your BGLs frequently – This should be triple the time you typically check. Being sick makes you more susceptible to BGL extremes. Administer insulin accordingly – Medicine, just like food, must be dosed for. Blood Glucose Levels Even without sugar, short-term cold medicines can send your blood glucose levels spinning. Aspirin has been known to lower glucose levels Pseudoepinephrine, the decongestant found in most over-the-counter Continue reading >>

Do Any Natural Supplements Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Do Any Natural Supplements Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Many natural supplements can affect your blood sugar, including niacin, DHEA, ginkgo biloba, melatonin, black or green tea, glucosamine sulfate and high-dose fish oil or vitamin C. Other supplements might lower blood sugar levels and require a dosage change if you take a medication for diabetes. Check with your health care provider before you start taking any supplement so that you can be aware of how the supplement might affect your blood sugar, blood lipids, blood pressure and kidneys, as well as any potential drug interactions. Video of the Day Niacin and niacinamide, or vitamin B-3, are used to lower total and “bad” LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, while increasing “good” HDL levels. According to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, niacin and niacinamide can cause hyperglycemia – or high blood sugar, abnormal glucose tolerance and glycosuria – or sugar loss in the urine. If you start high dose niacin, you might need to check your blood glucose more often, and the dose of any diabetes medications might need to be adjusted. DHEA has been taken for many conditions. According to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, it might be effective in treating aging skin, erectile dysfunction, osteoporosis, schizophrenia and systemic lupus. DHEA can increase insulin resistance and raise blood sugar levels, and might also worsen fat levels. If you have diabetes, check with your doctor before taking DHEA and monitor your blood sugar level closely. Ginkgo biloba is also taken for many conditions. It might be beneficial in treating age-related memory impairment, dementia, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and peripheral vascular disease. According to the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, ginkgo seems to alter insulin secretion and metabolism. It mi Continue reading >>

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

THURSDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to have severe blood sugar fluctuations than those who take other types of the drugs, a new study finds. The increased risk was low but doctors should consider it when prescribing the class of antibiotics, known as fluoroquinolones, to people with diabetes, the researchers said. This class of antibiotics, which includes drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin), is commonly used to treat conditions such as urinary tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia. One expert said the study should serve as a wake-up call for doctors. "Given a number of alternatives, physicians may consider prescribing alternate antibiotics ... in the place of fluoroquinolones (particularly moxifloxacin) to patients with diabetes," said Dr. Christopher Ochner, assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "In general, this study demonstrates that closer attention needs to be paid to particular drug-condition interactions." The study included about 78,000 people with diabetes in Taiwan. The researchers looked at the patients' use of three classes of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones; second-generation cephalosporins (cefuroxime, cefaclor, or cefprozil); or macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin). The investigators also looked for any emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood sugar swings among the patients in the 30 days after they started taking the antibiotics. The results showed that patients who took fluoroquinolones were more likely to have severe blood sugar swings than those who took antibiotics in the other classes. The level of risk Continue reading >>

Non-diabetes Drugs And Supplements That Affect Glucose Levels

Non-diabetes Drugs And Supplements That Affect Glucose Levels

A certified diabetes educator provides a list, and what to do to prevent a blood sugar swing caused by a new medication. The main medicine people with Type 1 diabetes take on a daily basis is insulin, but did you know that other non-diabetes-related medications can affect your blood sugar, too? This side effect can create havoc on your glucose management if you don’t adjust your insulin levels to accommodate it. sponsor Here’s a list of medications to consider: Some common medications that can increase glucose levels: Valium and Ativan (benzodiazepines) Thiazide diuretics, which are taken as blood pressure medicine The steroids cortisone, prednisone, and hydrocortisone Birth control pills Progesterone Catecholamines, which include the EpiPen and asthma inhalers Decongestants that contain pseudoephedrine Niacin Zyprexa and many other antipsychotic medications Some common medications or supplements that can cause low glucose levels include: Aspirin Asian ginseng Aloe Magnesium salicylate Quinine (This is a partial list. Diabetes in Control has created a PDF of a more complete list, which you can find by clicking here.) sponsor Each time you get a prescription for a new medication, try to read the info that comes with the medication or ask the pharmacist if they know about any effects the medicine might have on blood sugar levels. If you start to take any vitamins or herbal supplements, you should also mention these to your doctor so they can check if there are interactions. If you’ll be using a medicine long-term, talk to your doctor about its effect on glucose levels and if there is an alternative that could be taken that has no effect. If not, work on a plan with your diabetes care team to evaluate the effect and, if necessary, come up with a way to counter it. If Continue reading >>

Thyroid Meds Increase Risk For Elevated Blood Sugar

Thyroid Meds Increase Risk For Elevated Blood Sugar

Twenty-two million people are on Synthroid (levothyroxine) today in the United States. Millions of others are on other thyroid medications like Armour. Patients are usually on these medications for life once they start. Hidden deep within the drug literature precautions is startling information about blood sugar risks. Thyroid medications may pose a risk to your blood sugar levels. Of the millions of individuals who are on thyroid meds, have you been informed of this risky possibility? If you are not aware of this potential hazard, this information is for you! Managing health requires many things. Often you need to be a detective and dig deep within the literature and ask questions. This is indeed the case with thyroid medications. Hidden deep within thyroid medication literature is a surprising statement on the risk of elevated blood sugar levels. It is easily glossed over or not recognized at all. This information may not be present in the condensed version of drug safety information handed out by the pharmacist or on the online consumer versions for Synthroid or levothyroxine. Drug Safety Sheet Information Detective work on the topic of thyroid drug pharmacology provides this information. Abbvie Labs, the makers of Synthroid provide this statement on their website hidden deep within their professional literature in the miscellaneous section. “Addition of levothyroxine to antidiabetic or insulin therapy may result in increased antidiabetic agent or insulin requirements. Careful monitoring of diabetic control is recommended, especially when thyroid therapy is started, changed, or discontinued.” The only other statement found within Synthroid/levothyroxine professional literature on this risk was “Levothyroxine has a narrow therapeutic index. Regardless of the ind Continue reading >>

Medications That Increase Blood Glucose (sugar) Or Cause Diabetes

Medications That Increase Blood Glucose (sugar) Or Cause Diabetes

Introduction There are many types of medications that increase blood glucose (sugar), causing high blood glucose (hyperglycemia). Many of these medications worsen diabetes or increase the risk of diabetes. It is important to know which medications can increase blood glucose so that diabetic patients can use alternative agents or monitor their glucose levels and use appropriate methods to maintain control. Here are 9 types of medications that increase blood glucose. Medications that Increase Blood Glucose (Sugar) 1. Glucocorticoids (hydrocortisone, prednisone, prednisolone, methylprednisolone, triamcinolone, dexamethasone, fludrocortisone) Glucocorticoids are steroids and they affect how the body uses glucose. They affect the immune system and they are used for treatment of inflammatory, allergic, and immunologic conditions. Glucocorticoids are usually the most common cause of drug-induced hyperglycemia. Glucocorticoids cause an increase in blood glucose in various ways such as increased production of glucose in the liver, increased insulin resistance, and increased production of receptors (PPAR-gamma receptors) that regulate glucose uptake and conversion in the body. Patients that are treated with glucocorticoids should have their blood glucose monitored regularly. Inhaled steroids or creams are less likely to affect blood glucose levels. 2. Antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, chlorpromazine, perphenazine, iloperidone, paliperidone, aripiprazole, ziprasidone) Antipsychotics are used for treatment of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and borderline personality disorder. Antipsychotic medications are associated with weight gain, obesity, and increase in triglycerides which are risk factors for developmen Continue reading >>

Medications That Increase Or Decrease Blood Glucose Levels!

Medications That Increase Or Decrease Blood Glucose Levels!

In the second part of the series on drug interactions that persons with diabetes should watch out for, we talk of which medicines increase or decrease your blood glucose level and what you should watch out for. Often persons with diabetes are on medications other than the diabetes drugs (oral or injectable). They may be on some medications for life for chronic conditions (such as thyroid, mental disorders etc) or acute conditions (such as allergies, infections etc). Drug interactions are known to occur between 2 sets of drugs. For such patients, such interacts can be crucial as they can tamper the blood glucose levels. The specific pathway behind such mechanisms may not be fully known, but it is hypothesized that certain drugs cause a decrease in peripheral insulin sensitivity, increase the gluconeogenesis or decrease insulin secretion from the β cells of the pancreas. Concurrently, if the glucose levels seem uncontrollable, it would be wise to investigate whether a simultaneous or new medicine is responsible for it. Let’s look at medications that are known to affect blood sugar levels. Medicines that may raise blood glucose levels: DRUG MECHANISM NOTE Corticosteroids Opposes insulin action. Inhaled and topical steroids have a lower risk of affecting blood glucose than oral agents. Diuretics (esp Thiazides) Opposes insulin action. Effects depend on dose and duration of use. Atypical & Typical antipsychotics Insulin resistance, weight gain, diabetic ketoacidosis. Switching to low risk anti-psychotics is helpful. Niacin/Nicotinic acid Opposes insulin action. Seen when doses > 2-3 mg/day used. Oral contraceptives Opposes insulin action. Nifedipine (calcium channel blockers) Opposes insulin action. Lower dose & monitoring is helpful. Phenytoin Clonidine Inhibits insulin Continue reading >>

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

From cough syrup to decongestants, here are the over-the-counter drugs that may affect your blood glucose Continue reading >>

Drugs That Raise Your Blood Sugar

Drugs That Raise Your Blood Sugar

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you probably know about the different types of food and drink that can increase your blood sugar (glucose). But did you know some prescription medicines can do this as well? This is why you should tell everyone who prescribes medicines for you—doctors, dentists, or nurse practitioners—that you have diabetes. At the same time, it’s important for the doctor or nurse practitioner managing your diabetes treatment to know of any new medicines you may be taking that were prescribed by someone else. There are many medicines that can raise blood sugar and cause hyperglycemia, or blood sugar levels above normal. If you aren’t sure about a medication you’ve been prescribed, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it will affect your blood sugar before you start taking it. Common medicines that raise blood sugar levels include: Steroids Corticosteroids, called steroids for short, are often prescribed to treat conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma, among others. While they can be very effective in managing those types of problems, they can also wreak havoc on your blood sugar levels. Luckily, when the steroid doses decrease or when you're told you can stop taking the medication, usually your sugar levels will return to their previous readings. Some examples of steroids include prednisone and prednisolone. Antipsychotics Patients with certain mental illnesses, like schizophrenia, rely on medications such as antipsychotics to manage their symptoms. While these medicines can be life saving, they are also known to raise blood sugar levels, especially clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo, Versacloz), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zyprexa, Zydis), risperidone (Risperdal), aripiprazole (Abilify), quetiapine fumarate (Seroquel), and ziprasidone (Geo Continue reading >>

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