diabetestalk.net

What Makes You Itch With Diabetes?

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

How To Stop Itching From Diabetes

Edit Article Three Methods:Stopping the Itch with Lifestyle ChangesStopping the Itch with Home RemediesStopping the Itch with MedicationCommunity Q&A Diabetics frequently experience horrible itching. It is a common side effect of elevated blood glucose levels, which is the defining factor of diabetes. If you suffer from unbearable itchiness, this wikiHow article explains ways that you can soothe your irritated skin. 1 Prevent skin from getting dry. Keep your skin moist and healthy by using moisturizers and skin creams. Avoid scented creams and lotions, BECAUSE you could have a reaction to them, causing more itching. Moisturize twice a day. Every time you shower, use one ounce or two tablespoons to moisturize your whole body, or use as needed.[1] You should also avoid using scented soaps BECAUSE the chemicals in it can cause skin to get dry and irritated. Use mild, unscented soaps instead. 2 Change your bathing style. Too frequent bathing can cause itching to get worse. Limit baths to once every 2 days. Bathing frequency can vary depending on climate, weather and your activities. However, once in two days should suffice. Avoid using very hot water; it tends to make the skin more irritated. Use water at room temperature or lower. Hot water dilates vessels speeding up metabolism of insulin, which can trigger hypoglycemia.[2] Another reason why diabetics should not use hot water is diabetics suffering from nerve damage lose sensitivity to pain and temperature and may unknowingly burn themselves with hot water. 3 Care for your skin in the summer. Summer is a time of sun and fun, but sun can also seriously irritate skin. To lessen itching in the summer, wear clothes made from light materials like cotton, chiffon or linen. Certain cloths like wool and silk can cause irritation Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. Many people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In some cases, skin problems can be the first sign that a person has diabetes. In some cases, people with diabetes develop skin conditions that can affect anyone. Examples of these conditions include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. However, people with diabetes also are more prone to getting certain conditions. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Some common skin conditions in people with diabetes: Acanthosis nigricans This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of the skin. Often, areas of tan or brown skin, sometimes slightly raised, appear on the sides of the neck, the armpits, and groin. Occasionally, these darkened areas might appear on the hands, elbows, and knees. Acanthosis nigricans can affect otherwise healthy people, or it can be associated with certain medical conditions. It is frequently found in people with diabetes. Allergic reactions Allergic reactions to foods, bug bites, and medicines can cause rashes, depressions or bumps on the skin. If you think you might be having an allergic reaction to a medicine, contact your health care provider. Severe allergic reactions might require emergency treatment. It is especially important for people with diabetes to check for rashes or bumps in the areas where they inject their insulin. Atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis is the narrowing of blood vessels thickening of the vessel walls. While atherosclerosis most often is associated with blood vessels in or near the heart, it can affect blood vessels throughout the body, including those that su Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

Diabetes And Skin Problems - How To Deal With Dry Itchy Skin

If you have diabetic skin problems, like itchy skin, it's important to care for your skin properly – read on for tips to add to your skin care regime! If you have diabetes then you’re more likely to have dry skin, which can lead to itchiness. Are you one of those who suffer with diabetes and itchy skin? Itchy skin and diabetes often go together. The good news is that by taking care of your skin, you may be able to help reduce the risk of developing skin problems due to dryness and maintain healthy-looking, smooth skin. 1 Itchy skin, diabetes related or not, can often be made worse by washing with the wrong skin care products that increase skin dryness. Although you might think you’re doing the right thing by keeping your skin clean, if you’re using the wrong products, or washing too frequently, then you can actually aggravate the problem. Try to use mild and gentle soaps that are free from harsh chemicals and heavy perfumes. Unless it’s necessary, don’t wash your skin more than twice a day – washing too often, especially with hot water, can actually dry the skin out more. Avoiding these triggers may help to minimize itchiness. 2 If you’ve got diabetes, itchy skin due to dryness can be a concern. A good moisturizer like Vaseline® Intensive Care™ Advanced Repair Unscented Lotion may help to soothe and relieve itchiness. With micro-droplets of Vaseline® Jelly and glycerin, this lotion locks in essential moisture to help facilitate the skin’s natural recovery process. It’s fast absorbing and gentle on skin. Moisturizing can help to calm your dry skin and may reduce the urge to scratch. Remember, even though dry, itchy skin can be uncomfortable, always try your best to avoid scratching as this can lead to skin becoming damaged. If you have diabetes an Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Make You Itch?

Does Diabetes Make You Itch?

Diabetes can affect your skin in itchy ways. It can change your nervous system to sense itching you otherwise wouldn’t. How does this happen, and what can you do about it? Itching should not be ignored. It can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort, pain, and infection. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the higher-than-normal blood sugar levels common in diabetes promote skin infections. The causes can be ordinary fungi, yeast, or bacterial rashes like anyone can get. Some other skin diseases only happen to people with diabetes or happen mostly to people with diabetes. These tend to have long names such as diabetic dermopathy and eruptive xanthomatosis. WebMD says as many as one out of three people with diabetes will have some kind of skin condition. Diabetes increases skin dryness and damages circulation. “Localized itching can be caused by a yeast infection, dry skin, or poor circulation,” says WebMD. “When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet.” Genital itching Diabetes can itch more than your skin. Diabetes.co.uk highlights genital yeast infections as a major problem in diabetes. This is because high glucose levels “provide ideal conditions for naturally present yeast to grow and diminishes the body’s ability to fight infection.” Diabetes can also deposit glucose in the urine, helping yeast to grow. Other causes of genital itching include lice, scabies, herpes, various skin diseases, chemical irritants, and allergies. These can affect anyone, but may be felt more strongly in people with diabetes. According to an article on Everyday Health, “diabetes affects the nervous system and alters the perception of sensation in the body.” A piece by Rachel Nall, RN, BS Continue reading >>

Causes Of Diabetic Itching

Causes Of Diabetic Itching

According to the Cleveland Clinic, itching skin, also known as pruritus, can have many causes in people with diabetes. Examples include yeast infections, dry skin and poor circulation. Most skin issues can be prevented or easily treated if caught early. If left untreated, however, some skin issues can lead to infection and other serious complications including amputation. Keeping diabetes under control is key to preventing skin-related complications. Video of the Day Candida albicans, a yeast-like fungus, is often responsible for itchy rashes with tiny blisters and scales. Fungal infections usually occur in warm, moist areas such as under the breasts, between fingers and toes, around the nails, in the corners of the mouth, the armpits and the groin. Three common forms of fungal infections include jock itch, athlete’s foot and ringworm. Medication may be necessary to treat fungal infections. According to the American Diabetes Association, eruptive xanthamatosis is often seen in individuals with uncontrolled blood glucose and high blood triglyceride levels. In this condition, itchy, yellow, firm, pea-like formations with a red halo develop on the skin, usually on the backs of hands, feet, arms, legs and buttocks. Once diabetes control has been restored, these bumps will disappear. Poor circulation, a result of the hardening and narrowing of blood vessels, often causes itching of the lower legs and feet. Lotion may aid in preventing itching from dry skin. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, keeping blood glucose levels under control, eliminating tobacco use and being physically active can help increase circulation and protect your legs and feet. Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum (NLD), a condition that can be itchy and painful, is caused by bloo Continue reading >>

Genital Itchiness

Genital Itchiness

Tweet Genital itching in either sex is an irritating problem that can simply be caused by allergies and skin irritations, or by more serious disorders and diseases such as diabetes. In cases where genital itching is caused by irritation or allergy, avoiding exposure to the irritant or allergen may be all that is needed for the itching to resolve. However, other causes of the condition may be more difficult to treat or may require more intensive treatment and could ultimately lead to serious complications. What are the causes of genital itchiness? Itching in the genital region can result from a wide range of things, including: Allergic reactions Bacterial vaginosis - a disease of the vagina caused by bacteria Cancer (penile and vulval cancers) - rare types of cancer that occur in the skin or tissues of the penis and a woman's external genitals (vulva), respectively Diabetes mellitus Chemical irritants such as detergents, fabric softeners, soaps, creams, ointments and sexual lubricants Menopause - a drop in the hormone estrogen causes vaginal dryness Pubic lice - parasitic insects, also known as crabs, that typically live in pubic hair Scabies - a contagious, extremely itchy skin disease caused by tiny mites Sexually transmitted diseases, such as genital herpes and trichomoniasis Skin conditions - such as psoriasis and eczema Tinea cruris - a fungal skin infection also known as ringworm of the groin Vaginal yeast infection Vaginitis - inflammation of the vaginal tissues Note that many of the infectious causes of genital itching, such as STDs and yeast infection, are contagious. Diabetes and genital itching Genital itching and burning can indicate a female or male yeast infection. Regular yeast infections are a sign of type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, blood glucose levels can Continue reading >>

Genital Itching – Symptom Of Diabetes

Genital Itching – Symptom Of Diabetes

Itching and irritation around the genitals can be a sign of high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) and diabetes. Causes Possible causes of genital itching include: Diabetes Eczema Low estrogen levels in women Psoriasis Pubic lice Reactions to chemicals used to wash clothes Yeast infections Itching as a symptom of diabetes If diabetes is causing the itching in men, it tends to lead to itching under the foreskin of the penis. In women, it can lead to itching of the vulva, the skin on the outside of the vagina. If diabetes is the cause, you may notice other symptoms of diabetes, such as needing to go to the toilet more often than normal. If you suspect you may have diabetes, see your doctor for a diagnosis. Genital itching and diabetes Itchy privates can occur if blood glucose levels run high, causing sugar to be passed out in the urine. Sugar makes a fertile breeding ground for bacteria and it is a buildup of bacteria around the genitals that causes the itching. If you’re getting itchy down there as a result of high sugar levels, wash the affected area to clean away any build up of bacteria. Don’t use any harsh soaps that might lead to irritation. If you can bring your blood glucose levels back to normal, this also should help the itching to subside. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high levels of glucose in the bloodstream which leads to hyperglycemia if untreated. It is strongly linked to obesity and unhealthy lifestyle habits such as lack of physical activity, poor diet and smoking. How common is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common form of diabetes mellitus, accounting for roughly 90% of all cases of diabetes. It affects an estimated 330 million people worldwide, including over 29 million people in the Unite Continue reading >>

Can’t Sleep Because My Feet And Hands Itch So Bad. What’s Causing This?

Can’t Sleep Because My Feet And Hands Itch So Bad. What’s Causing This?

Q: I am a type 2 diabetic. Just recently I have not been able to sleep because my feet and hands itch so bad. What is causing this? I've tried lotions but that doesn't help. Please help. I'm sorry to hear that you are having a problem with itching in your hands and feet. It could possibly be a symptom of nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy, a common complication of diabetes. However, you would likely have other symptoms as well, such as pain and numbness. A more likely cause could be that your blood sugar levels are too high. If you've noticed that your blood sugar readings have been increasing, it's important to get them under control before permanent nerve damage occurs. On the other hand, if your blood sugar levels are consistently less than 140 mg at all times (fasting and after meals), the itching probably isn't related to diabetes. At any rate, it's important to follow up with your doctor to discuss your symptoms, receive a definitive diagnosis, and potentially have your diabetes treatment changed (along with making lifestyle changes like cutting back on carbs) if the cause is determined to be elevated blood sugar levels. I wish you the best of luck with everything. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. Disclaimer The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for, and dLife does not provide, professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard prof Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

Does Diabetes Cause Itching?

People with diabetes experience skin itching at higher rates than those without the condition. Ultimately, itching can lead to excessive scratching, which can cause discomfort and pain. A study of nearly 2,700 people with diabetes and 499 without diabetes found that itching was a common diabetes symptom. An estimated 11.3 percent of those with diabetes reported skin itching versus 2.9 percent of people without diabetes. A person with diabetes should not ignore itchy skin. Dry, irritated, or itchy skin is more likely to become infected, and someone with diabetes may not be able to fight off infections as well as someone who does not have diabetes. There are a variety of treatments available that can help to reduce diabetes-related skin itching so that a person can be more comfortable and avoid other skin complications. Causes of diabetes itching There are many reasons why a person with diabetes might experience itching more often than someone else. Sometimes itching can result from damaged nerve fibers located in the outer layers of skin. Often, the cause of diabetes-related itching is diabetic polyneuropathy or peripheral neuropathy. This condition occurs when high blood glucose levels damage nerve fibers, particularly those in the feet and hands. Before the nerve damage occurs, the body experiences high levels of cytokines. These are inflammatory substances that can lead to a person's skin itching. Sometimes, persistent itchiness may indicate that someone with diabetes is at risk of nerve damage, so the itchiness should never be ignored. Also, people with diabetes can experience associated disorders that include kidney or liver failure. These conditions may also cause itching. A person with diabetes can experience skin itching related to a new medication they are takin Continue reading >>

Itchy Skin And Diabetes

Itchy Skin And Diabetes

Tweet Itchy skin can be a sign of diabetes, particularly if other diabetes symptoms are also present. High blood sugar levels over a prolong period of time is one cause of itchy skin. In some cases, itchy skin may be caused by complications of diabetes such as nerve damage or kidney disease. Itching of the feet, legs or ankles is a common complaint in people with diabetes that may occur as a result of a period of too high sugar levels. Itching can range from being annoying to severe. Itching can be relieved through treatment, and may be eliminated if the underlying cause is treated. Causes of itchy skin Itchiness of the lower limbs can result from a number of causes including: Dry skin Poor circulation Dermatitis (eczema) Psoriasis Allergies Diabetic neuropathy Diabetic nephropathy Athletes foot Urticaria (hives) Chillblains A number of medications, such as antibiotics, antifungal drugs or opiate painkillers, may also lead to itchy skin. Diagnosis of the underlying problem It is advisable to see your doctor if itching is severe or persistent. You should also see your doctor if itching affects your whole body or if other symptoms accompany the itching. Diagnosis of the reason behind itching may be identified through taking a skin sample or through taking a blood sample to check for signs of an underlying cause. Itch, scratch cycle The itch, scratch cycle describes a process in which responding to an itch by scratching can damage or break the skin causing inflammatory chemicals to be released from the body which further intensify the need to itch. Itching may be relieved through avoiding chemicals with perfumes which may irritate the skin and avoiding exposure of your skin to hot water. Moisturising cream can be used to moisturise dry skin or as a preventative measure aga Continue reading >>

Itchy Skin May Be A Warning Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

Itchy Skin May Be A Warning Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

It’s winter, and one of the tell-tale signs of the season often emerges as dry and itchy skin. However, did you know that these symptoms can also be warning signs of Type 2 diabetes? It’s true. Pruritus, which simply means “itching,” is a common symptom of diabetes. While it’s always a good idea to keep your skin moisturized, there are common conditions associated with diabetes that may cause your skin to itch, crack, and peel. There are various underlying causes that can lead to diabetic pruritus. Here are three of the most common chronic conditions. Poor circulation. Individuals who experience itching in the feet and lower legs may be experiencing the result of poor circulation. Poor circulation causes narrowing and hardening of the blood vessels, which, in turn, causes noticeable itching on the surface of the skin. To lessen the severity of the itching, consider taking the following action steps: • Eliminate the use of tobacco • Adopt a regular exercise routine • Keep blood glucose levels in check Fungal infections. Fungal infections are common in individuals with diabetes and are treated with medication. Because different fungi respond to different medications, it’s best to discuss the best course of action to take with your medical care provider. Common symptoms of fungal infections include dry, red, and cracking skin, blisters or breaking down of the skin, and itching. Because high glucose levels in the body enhance the growth of these infections, you’ll want to be diligent about keeping your glucose under control to prevent fungal growth on the skin. Also, keeping your skin clean and dry will go a long way in warding off fungal infections. Fungal infections commonly thrive in these areas on the body: • Armpits • Groin area • Between fing Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms: Genital Itching Could Be Uncommon Sign Of Condition | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms: Genital Itching Could Be Uncommon Sign Of Condition | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes type 2: Itchy genitals could be a sign of condition Diabetes type 2 symptoms: Genital itching could be uncommon sign of condition Genital itching in either sex is an irritating problem that can simply be caused by allergies and skin irritations, or by more serious disorders and diseases such as diabetes, said Diabetes.co.uk. In cases where genital itching is caused by irritation or allergy, avoiding exposure to the irritant or allergen may be all that is needed for the itching to resolve. However, other causes of the condition may be more difficult to treat or may require more intensive treatment and could ultimately lead to serious complications. Without treatment, genital itching could lead to spreading infectious diseases, or a secondary skin infection, the charity said. Diabetes type 2: Symptoms include regular yeast infections Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups. Diabetes type 2: Genital itching could lead to a secondary skin infection Genital itching could also be a sign of bacterial vaginosis, menopause, a sexually-transmitted disease, skin conditions, or scabies. Many of the infectious causes of genital itching - including sexually-transmitted diseases and yeast infections - are contagious, the charity warned. If genital itching doesnt disappear after a couple of days, you should speak to a GP or pharmacist. Genital itching includes an itchiness or burning sensation in, and around, the vagina or penis. Diabetes type 2: See a GP if genital itching doesn't go away Diabetes type Continue reading >>

More in diabetes