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What Kind Of Shoes Are Good For Diabetics?

Best Footwear For Diabetics?

Best Footwear For Diabetics?

Like alot of others, I'm on my feet all day at work. I'm usually in constant motion and doing alot of lifting, and my feet have been really sore lately after work. I wear Skechers and they used to be comfortable but now it seems like they are making the issue worse. What would be the best choice in a sneaker or work shoe for a diabetic? You need to look for shoes with super support that also have a wide toe box to prevent damage to the toes. There are diabetic socks that are made to be non-constricting. If you have weight issues you may want to try light compression socks to keep the fluid from pooling in your legs and feet. These are the things that have helped me. One important feature that i found in foot care, is not only the shoe that you purchase, but the socks you were. there are socks made just for diabetics that have seams. i am on my feet all day, which for me means my feet swell by mid day. I try to keep my socks on the thin side, not heavy, so when my feet swell, they can still have room. To help keep my shoes dry from sweat, i put foot powder in them at night to absorb the sweat. Many people can not have a lot of powder in their shoes, so simply dump the excess powder in a baggie and use it again the next night. The residue in the shoe will be just enough to keep the sweating down a bit. dont forget, arch support in shoes are very important. If it is at all possible ,try to get a shoe especially made for dibetics.It is advisable to get at least one pair. It may be a little expensive if you do not have insurance. Your Doctor will write you a pescription and advise you where to go. The best thing is to do is discuss it with your DR.to see if they are needed. Best advice I could give is go to at least one specialist store with trained staff. Get measured, tal Continue reading >>

Find The Right Shoes For Diabetes

Find The Right Shoes For Diabetes

For most people, a bad shoe day means a blistered heel or painful arch that goes away quickly. But for people with diabetes, poor footwear can trigger serious problems, such as foot ulcers, infections, and even amputation. Foot problems aren't inevitable, though. Ralph Guanci learned the hard way to pick his shoes with care and to stick with wearing them because they're good medicine for his feet. Guanci, 57, a businessman in Carlisle, Massachusetts, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 25 years ago. For the first two decades, his feet seemed fairly normal, and he gave little thought to footwear. "I wore anything I wanted," he says. But a few years ago, he developed foot trouble: a foot bone injury that prompted recurring, infected blisters on his sole. After doctors cured the problem with surgery and antibiotics, Guanci started wearing only one brand of comfort shoes called SAS that his podiatrist had recommended. "The only times I've violated that, I usually regret it," he says. During one business trip, he ditched his podiatrist-recommended shoes for a fancier pair. "I wanted to look dressy, so I wore an expensive pair of shoes." He wasn't planning to walk much, but after dinner, his companions sprung a surprise plan: a two-mile stroll back to the hotel. "When I got back to my room, my sock was full of blood and there was a huge blister on my foot," Guanci says. He flew home that night and went straight from the airport to his podiatrist's office. The blister, which was on the ball of his foot, forced him onto crutches and took four months to heal, he says. Why are diabetic feet so vulnerable? Diabetes patients -- who number 17.9 million in the U.S. -- know that good blood sugar control reduces risk of complications. But poorly controlled diabetes delivers a double wha Continue reading >>

Diabetes Shoes: How To Find The Right Diabetic Shoes

Diabetes Shoes: How To Find The Right Diabetic Shoes

Update: We have had dozens of our readers ask us where can they get the best and cheapest diabetic shoes. We suggest you try this link to order. In this comprehensive guide we will cover everything you need to know about diabetic shoes. Do not buy any shoes until you read the guide from start to end. What are diabetic shoes? It is very common amongst people with diabetes to develop foot problems. Per year, the American Diabetes Association indicates that 600,000 people with diabetes get foot ulcers which can result in over 80,000 amputations. Neuropathy is when there is a nerve damage in the foot which can then lead to foot problems. Neuropathy causes tingling, pain, burning or stinging sensations, weakness in the foot. The worst is when you injure your foot, you may not even feel it due to loss of feeling. If you do not have any feeling in your feet, then it may make your injury or illness worse than it was before. It has been shown that people with diabetes have the highest cases of foot or leg amputation due to their foot problems. This is also caused due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD). PAD reduces blood flow to your feet. That along with neuropathy, you can only imagine the possibilities of getting an ulcer or infection on your foot. However, you can prevent matters from getting so serious that you may require an amputation in the future. You need to take good care of your foot. People with diabetes should regularly visit their podiatrists to ensure their feet is taken good care of. Regular care of your feet can also include the addition of proper footwear. You can ask your doctor if you need to start wearing prescription shoes, which may be covered by Medicare or other insurances. I recommend reading the following articles: If you are having trouble walking o Continue reading >>

10 Best Diabetic Shoes Reviewed

10 Best Diabetic Shoes Reviewed

People with diabetes are more susceptible to foot problems. This health affliction can lead to nerve damage that affects a person’s ability to grasp the exact moment when their feet are injured. Consequently, diabetes elevates the risks for getting serious wounds and ulcers on the feet, which may also become serious enough to lead to amputation. Furthermore, diabetes also impacts the ability of the body to heal. This is because the feet receives less blood and oxygen, therefore it takes more time to recover from even a minor skin irritation. A diabetic foot is also more prone to swelling or edema. You can minimize the risks of both short term and long term foot injury, as a diabetes patient, by wearing a pair of good diabetic shoes. These are available in various types – such as diabetic dress shoes, work shoes or walking shoes. Whatever the type, good diabetic shoes are unified in eliminating the risk of diabetic foot injury and the benefits they offer to the wearer. The optimal diabetic shoes are generally made from breathable materials like suede and leather and are created to cushion and support the heel and ankle. Such shoes also help in the even distribution of weight of the body across the foot to eliminate the problem of pain in the pressure points. By Daniel Gonzalez: The latest update includes a revised list of the top 10 shoes for diabetics. This list features shoes from brands such as Skechers, New Balance, Propet and Orthofeet (who are all know to provide the most comfortable, cushioned & specialized shoes around). We’ve also included the criteria we used to evaluate the best diabetic shoes, and some of the most frequently asked questions about the subject. Featured Recommendations An optimal diabetic shoe also comes with more depth to accommodate cus Continue reading >>

The Best Shoes For People With Diabetes

The Best Shoes For People With Diabetes

Cowboy boots, pumps, wingtips, or sneakers? If you have diabetes, choosing shoes is far more than a matter of looksits a vital part of your treatment plan. Finish off an outfit with well-fitting, comfortable shoes or boots and you can prevent sores, nerve damage, and even amputation. It may take some time and patience, and perhaps the advice of your podiatrist or an experienced footwear professional, but you can find footwear thats both flattering and healthy for your feet. Look for shoes that: Breathe. Air circulation can keep your feet safe from fungus or bacteria. Choose shoes made of porous materials, such as leather or fabric. Skip those made with stifling plastic. However, dont aim for too much of a good thing. Sandals and flip-flops may give your feet more oxygen, but they also increase your risk of injury. Avoid them. Absorb shock. Special shock-absorbing soles, often found in athletic shoes, can reduce the impact your feet take with each step. If your shoes dont come with this feature, you may be able to purchase special insoles that serve the same purpose. Dont pinch or crowd. High heels and pointed toes may be in vogue, but theyre likely to cause long-term damage. Search for low-heeled styles that dont rub or pinch your feet or cause calluses or blisters. Carefully inspect the inner surface for jagged edges or shoddy workmanship. Over time, these seemingly minor annoyances can turn into big problems, including ulcers and infections. Fit well. Shoes that are too big may cause your foot to shift inside without you noticing, squashing your toes, or increasing the pressure on them. But dont be tempted to buy shoes that are too small, which can hinder your circulation. After receiving a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, it may be hard to motivate yourself to make the Continue reading >>

The Best Shoes For People With Diabetes

The Best Shoes For People With Diabetes

Two complications people with diabetes may be at risk for are poor circulation and the absence of sensation, according to John Giurini, DPM, Chief, Division of Podiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is an affiliate of the Joslin Diabetes Center). People with these diabetes complications may not be aware of whether or not their shoes fit correctly, so their feet must be properly measured and fitted before purchasing shoes. Tips for Buying Shoes with Diabetes Have feet measured periodically, because feet change over time. Shop later in the day, because feet swell throughout the day, especially if you have heart disease and kidney problems. Have shoes fitted with the socks you’ll be wearing with those specific shoes. That way you’ll know they will fit properly. The distance between your longest toe and the tip of the shoe should be ½ of your thumb’s width, so you have the right amount of space to fit your feet. When you buy a new pair of shoes, break them in before wearing them for a long period of time. Wear them for one to two hours, then check your feet for any cuts or blisters. Wear them three to four hours the next day, and so on, until they feel comfortable, Giurini says. Important Shoe Features for People with Diabetes Shoes should be made of soft leather, because they can stretch. Choose a cushioned sole over a thin, leather sole, because the shock absorption is better. The back of the shoe should not collapse to one side or the other, because it won’t provide good support. Choose laced shoes over loafers, so they fit better and provide better support. People with diabetes and specific foot deformities should buy shoes that match the width of their foot, perhaps with extra depth. Those with diabetes and seve Continue reading >>

Do I Need Diabetic Shoes?

Do I Need Diabetic Shoes?

Poorly controlled blood sugar can damage many parts of the body, including the nerves and vessels that go to the feet. Because of this, people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing foot problems. Wearing specially designed shoes can help reduce risk and promote healthy circulation in your feet. Read on to find out more about shoes designed for people with diabetes and whether you might need them. High blood sugar contributes to poor blood circulation. It can also damage nerves in your feet, a condition called neuropathy. Neuropathy can cause you to lose feeling in your feet, which may make it difficult for you to realize if you cut yourself or injure your foot. If you leave a cut untreated, it can lead to an infection. Poor circulation can make it difficult to heal cuts and infections. Diabetic foot pain and ulcers: Causes and treatments » You might develop open sores on your toes or the bottom of your feet. You may also develop calluses, or thick areas of hardened skin. The following are all more likely to occur in people with diabetes: bunions corns fungal infections gangrene Nerve damage can also change the shape of your feet. People with diabetes are more likely to develop hammertoe, which is a deformity that causes the toe joints to bend inward. Even foot problems that might seem insignificant, like blisters or athlete’s foot, can be a cause of concern if you have diabetes. Because of poor circulation to the area, any foot problem will take longer to heal and may instead compound and grow into a dangerous infection that can progress and lead to amputations if not correctly treated. That’s why any foot issues should be called to the attention of your doctor if you have diabetes. Foot injuries and changes to the foot’s shape can make your regular Continue reading >>

The Best Walking Shoes For Diabetics

The Best Walking Shoes For Diabetics

Toby Pendergrass began writing and editing in 1998. He has served as editor for numerous custom health publications and physician journals. His work has appeared in publications such as Hospital Corporation of America's "YOU." He enjoys writing about cardiology and cancer care and holds a Bachelor of Arts in communication from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Comfortable walking shoes are vital to the health of a diabetic.Photo Credit: Jupiterimages/Stockbyte/Getty Images Foot problems are a common concern for those with diabetes. The disease causes nerve damage that impacts your ability to recognize when your feet are injured and elevates your risk for ulcers and, in some cases, amputation. Diabetes also affects your bodys ability to heal. Your feet receive less blood and oxygen when you have the disease, so recovery from even a minor skin irritation can be lengthy. Reduce your risk for long-term foot injury by following a few safety guidelines when purchasing walking shoes. While many walking shoes initially have a tight fit but stretch over time, a lack of sensitivity in your feet caused by diabetes often prevents you from recognizing your shoes are too tight until a blister has developed. Choose walking shoes that are comfortable and give your feet and toes sufficient room for movement. Socks are essential to your foot protection, so check that any new shoes have room for socks made of thicker fabric. Your feet are often more swollen late in the day, so try on walking shoes in the afternoon or evening to ensure the shoes will be comfortable around the clock. MedlinePlus recommends leather, canvas or suede walking shoes for those with a diabetes diagnosis. Bypass potential foot injury that can come from wearing walking shoes that dont let your feet breath Continue reading >>

Tips For Buying Diabetes-friendly Shoes | Everyday Health

Tips For Buying Diabetes-friendly Shoes | Everyday Health

When you have type 2 diabetes, you need to pay close attention to your feet and the shoes you put on them. Heres why: People with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing poor circulation and nerve damage in their feet, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Poor blood flow to the feet makes it more difficult for wounds to heal. Even minor issues, like calluses, blisters, and cuts, can become serious problems and lead to infection. And nerve damage can cause loss of sensation in your feet , so you may not feel if you step on something sharp, if your shoes are rubbing or pinching, or if you get a blister. All of this means that the right footwear is a must. Your shoes must not only be comfortable but fit well too, says Adam Isaac, DPM, director of the Complex Foot Wound Clinic at Kaiser Permanente Mid-Atlantic States. Shoes that fit properly can help protect your feet and reduce your risk of developing foot ulcers and infections. Heres how to be sure the shoes you wear are diabetes-friendly: See your podiatrist before you shop. Your podiatrist can recommend the best type of shoes for you and let you know if you need custom orthotics, says Dr. Isaac. Orthotics can provide additional comfort and support, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association. You may need prescription diabetic shoes that have extra depth to them and supportive arches, Isaac says. Shop for shoes later in the day. Your feet can swell over the course of the day, and you want to get a true idea of how the shoe is going to feel in real-life scenarios, Isaac says. A shoe that fits in the morning may feel too tight by the end of the day. Check the size of both feet. One foot can be larger than the other. The differences arent going to be significant, like two sizes bi Continue reading >>

30 Best Shoes For Diabetics Protect Your Feet

30 Best Shoes For Diabetics Protect Your Feet

Orthotic Diabetic Slippers for Men and Women In all honesty, the biggest cause of concern for diabetics is peripheral neuropathy, a disease that causes nerve damage in the feet and lower limbs. Wearing ill-fitting shoes could lead to the pinching of feet causing complications such as foot injury and ulcerations. Because the diabetic foot doesnt feel any pain, this could possibly lead to more serious problems, which are usually identified too late. Thankfully, many such diabetes-related problems can be avoided by wearing the right pair of shoes for diabetics. These shoes help diabetics keep their feet comfortable and protected. They are designed to minimize chances of injury to the feet and lower limbs. The footwear is generally deeper and wider than regular walking or fitness shoes. This gives extra space for necessary orthotic insoles created specifically for the individual patients needs. Diabetic shoes must also provide plenty of air circulation. For that reason, many models are available in fabric uppers or as sandal styles. This doesnt work well for those who choose a more active lifestyle. Fortunately, many top fitness shoe manufacturers have jumped on the diabetic shoe bandwagon and offering a range of shoe widths that are not easily available such as wide and extra extra wide widths for men and women. The following are among the best for keeping your feet in ship shape while controlling the disease. Below, we have compiled a 2018 list of the best mens and womens shoe styles for diabetics that are suitable for casual wear, dress shoes for office or formal wear and running and waking shoes that will keep your feet in good health during long walks for any fitness activity. The shoes listed below are Diabetic friendly and most styles have the Medicare/HCPCS code = Continue reading >>

Shoe Shopping With Diabetes

Shoe Shopping With Diabetes

If you are living with diabetes, shopping for shoes is more than a matter of style. By following some simple guidelines to ensure a good, comfortable fit, you can prevent potentially serious foot problems. Even minor foot problems, like calluses or blisters, can lead to serious diabetes-related complications. Diabetes can cause poor blood flow to your feet, making it more difficult for wounds to heal, sometimes resulting in infections and possibly amputation. Complicating matters, poorly controlled diabetes can also lead to nerve damage called peripheral neuropathy. This may cause you to lose sensation in your feet, so you may not feel potentially harmful cuts or blisters. To help protect your feet and overall health, it's important to know what to look for in diabetes shoes. "It's all about prevention," said Katherine Dux, DPM, a podiatrist at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill., who treats patients with diabetes. "Any friction in the shoe could lead to irritation and possible blister formation. This could lead to trouble down the road." Before you shop for diabetes footwear, it's important to have your feet evaluated by a podiatrist to determine your risk for infections or complications, said Dr. Dux. Based on this assessment, the doctor can recommend exactly which types of shoes will be best for your feet. What to Look For in Diabetes Footwear Even if your diabetes is under control and your feet are healthy, there are a number of factors you should consider when selecting shoes. By looking for certain characteristics and avoiding others, you can protect against irritation, infections, ulcers, and potentially worse foot problems. First, look for a shoe that has a large enclosed front, as well as a closed back and top. Shoes that expose your toes or heels Continue reading >>

4 Tips For Choosing The Right Shoes If You Have Diabetes

4 Tips For Choosing The Right Shoes If You Have Diabetes

4 Tips for Choosing the Right Shoes if You Have Diabetes 4 Tips for Choosing the Right Shoes if You Have Diabetes If you have diabetic peripheral neuropathy, you'll need to select shoes and break them in carefully to help prevent any type of injury. Even a tiny blister or ulcer can rapidly escalate into infection and gangrene, which could lead to an amputation. "If you're buying a pair of shoes, you should noteven if it's a Hush Puppyyou should not wear the shoe a full day," says Deborah Cochrane, 57, who has type 2 diabetes and lives in New York City. "You should phase it in. Wear it two hours and take it off. Because the shoe is basically fighting against your foot and if you develop a little blister, you're out for the count." It's also important to avoid going barefoot or wearing any shoes that don't protect your feet from injury. "Reckless behavior when you have neuropathy is walking around in flip-flops or barefoot," says Joseph LeMaster, MD, MPH, of the University of Missouri-Columbia. Shoes are required, even on the beach. "If you're on vacation in the Caribbean, can you imagine stepping on a shell? That can ruin your whole vacation," says Cochrane. "You have to be very, very careful of infection." Here's what you should look for when choosing shoes, according to the National Diabetes Education Program. Select lighter shoes over darker ones. Just 30 minutes in the sun can increase foot temperature 7.8 to 13.6 more in black shoes than white ones. Get prescription footwear. Although Medicare and other insurance companies cover custom-made shoes and inserts, less than 1% of people who could get them, actually do get them. Your doctor writes a prescription and an orthopedic surgeon, orthotist, podiatrist, or pedorthist can fit them for you. Select off-the-shelf com Continue reading >>

Many Diabetes Patients Wear The Wrong Shoes

Many Diabetes Patients Wear The Wrong Shoes

Failure to perform recommended foot care and wearing inappropriate footwear can set diabetes patients up for foot ulcers. Ulcers are painful and potentially serious. They can sometimes lead to amputation. Most diabetes patients polled for the study said they know proper foot care and properly fitting shoes are important. But they don't always follow through, according to Stephen Ogedengbe, MD, a researcher at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital in Benin City, Nigeria. He presented the study at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists' meeting in San Diego. ''There is no such thing as perfect footwear for persons with diabetes mellitus," he tells WebMD. "However, there are shoes which can help prevent or delay the onset of foot ulceration in diabetes. There are also shoes which can cause or help accelerate the development of foot ulceration." The study was conducted in Lagos, Nigeria. Ogedengbe and colleagues asked 41 patients with type 2 diabetes, on average about 57 years old, to answer questions about their footwear habits and foot care. The researchers found some good news: 90% had education about footwear 83% wash and dry their feet, a practice recommended daily 51% do the recommended routine self-exams of their feet However, about 56% told the researchers they always or occasionally walk around the house without shoes, which is not recommended. Nearly 15% did so outside, too. Next, researchers evaluated the participants' shoes. They found 68% of the footwear to be inappropriate. Among the shoes that didn't pass muster, Ogedengbe says, are: Shoes with pointed tips or toes High heels Thong-style sandals or flip-flops Besides inappropriate shoe styles, he tells WebMD, some wore shoes that were the wrong size. Despite these flaws in shoe wear, 73% of Continue reading >>

Best Walking Shoes And Sneakers For People With Diabetic Feet

Best Walking Shoes And Sneakers For People With Diabetic Feet

Walking is a beneficial activity that helps maintain weight and improve the cardiovascular system. Its especially useful for controlling blood sugar levels. Unfortunately, a simple stroll through the park is easier said than done for those with diabetes. People that suffer from diabetes must take special precautions with their feet. A number of issues can arise from simply wearing an ill-fitting pair of shoes. Diabetes can have a lasting effect on the feet. While proper blood sugar control helps reduce the chances of a problem, they can still arise. The condition can cause nerve damage, slow healing, ulcers, and much more. These issues can eventually lead to infection and amputation. Wearing improper shoes will only hasten these problems. Luckily, there are a number of options to help manage the effects of diabetes. Special shoes help people with diabetes keep their feet comfortable and protected. They are designed to avoid potential issues while taking advantage of the benefits of walking. Here are some of the best shoes for those with diabetes. 7 of the Best Diabetic Walking Shoes and Health Sneakers 1. Orthofeet 481 Mens Comfort Diabetic Therapeutic Extra Depth Boot This boot from Orthofeet is perfect for casual walks or everyday wear. Its made from textured leather and has a lace closure system for complete fit control. Inside, a carefully designed arch supports the foot. Theres also a gel insole to keep the foot protected and comfortable. It softens the blow on any type of surface, including pavement. It also helps improve stability for a safer walk. The entire shoe is designed to have a comfortable fit that doesnt bind the feet. Instead, it provides superior protection against pressure points, allowing anyone to walk with confidence. 2. Dr. Comfort Douglas Mens T Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shoe

Diabetic Shoe

Many diabetic shoes have velcro closures for ease of application and removal. Diabetic shoes are sometimes referred to as extra depth, therapeutic shoes or Sugar Shoes. They are specially designed shoes, or shoe inserts, intended to reduce the risk of skin breakdown in diabetics with pre-existing foot disease. People with diabetic neuropathy in their feet may have a false sense of security as to how much at risk their feet actually are.[1] An ulcer under the foot can develop in a couple of hours. The primary goal of therapeutic footwear is to prevent complications, which can include strain, ulcers, calluses, or even amputations for patients with diabetes and poor circulation.[2] Neuropathy can also change the shape of a person's feet, which limits the range of shoes that can be worn comfortably.[3] In addition to meeting strict guidelines, diabetic shoes must be prescribed by a physician and fit by a certified individual, such as an orthotist, podiatrist, therapeutic shoe fitter, or pedorthist. The shoes must also be equipped with a removable orthosis. Foot orthoses are devices such as shoe inserts, arch supports, or shoe fillers such as lifts, wedges and heels. The diabetic shoes and custom-molded inserts work together as a preventive system to help diabetics avoid foot injuries and improve mobility. In the United States, diabetic shoes can be covered by Medicare.[4] [edit] See also[edit] Diabetic sock Diabetic foot Continue reading >>

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