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What Kind Of Drug Is Januvia?

Dpp-4 Inhibitors Januvia, Onglyza, Trajenta, Combiglyze, Janumet, And Jentadueto

Dpp-4 Inhibitors Januvia, Onglyza, Trajenta, Combiglyze, Janumet, And Jentadueto

The image I've chosen for this page is the Roman god, Janus, whose prime characteristic of facing in two directions seems very appropriate for the similarly named drug Januvia, which can be extremely effective and extremely dangerous. Januvia was the first of a family of diabetes drugs that works by increasing the levels of GLP-1 in the bloodstream. Newer drugs in this family include Onglyza and Trajenta, as well as combination drugs which mix the incretin drug in the same pill as metformin. These drugs are Janumet, Kombiglyze, and Jentadueto. GLP-1 is an incretin hormone that stimulates insulin secretion. Another kind of incretin drug, which includes Byetta and Victoza are artificially synthesized molecules that behave just like GLP-1 in the body but last longer. The DPP-4 inhibitors are quite different. They are pills that cause the GLP-1 your body secretes on its own to rise to a higher than normal level by inhibiting the action of DPP-4. DPP-4 is an enzyme (a.k.a. protease) which when it is left to its own devices, chops up GLP-1 and another hormone, GIP. When DPP-4 is inhibited, GLP-1 does not get chopped up and remains active in the body. When GLP-1 is active, it stimulates insulin secretion when blood sugars rise. The Fatal Flaw with These Drugs: They Cause Abnormal Cell Growth and Pre-cancerous Tumors in the Pancreas For several years the FDA has been getting reports that drugs in both families of incretin drugs were causing pancreatitis, a painful inflammation of the pancreas that can destroy large portions of it and lead to full-fledged Type 1 diabetes or even death. They recently decided to study the issue, though, in typical FDA fashion they merely asked for more research without warning doctors to take patients off these dangerous drugs. A study run by a bi Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin; Januvia

Sitagliptin; Januvia

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Sitagliptin (januvia)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Sitagliptin (januvia)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Januvia Generic Name: sitagliptin (Pronunciation: SI ta glip tin) What is sitagliptin (Januvia)? Sitagliptin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. It works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Sitagliptin is for people with type 2 diabetes. Sitagliptin is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Sitagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of sitagliptin (Januvia)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking sitagliptin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: pancreatitis - severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate; or urinating less than usual or not at all; swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath; or severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling. Less serious side effects may include: runny or stuffy nose, sore throat; headache, back pain, joint or muscle pain; or This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important information I should know about sitagliptin (Januvia)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to sitagliptin or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoa Continue reading >>

Januvia (sitagliptin) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Januvia (sitagliptin) Dosage, Indication, Interactions, Side Effects | Empr

Adjunct to diet and exercise in type 2 diabetes, as monotherapy or combination therapy. Not for treatment of type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. Not studied in patients with history of pancreatitis. 100mg once daily. Renal impairment: eGFR 30<45mL/min/1.73m2: 50mg once daily; eGFR <30mL/min/1.73m2 or ESRD on dialysis: 25mg once daily. Assess renal function before starting therapy and periodically thereafter. Consider risks/benefits in patients with known risk factors for heart failure; monitor for signs/symptoms; evaluate and consider discontinuing if develops. Monitor for signs/symptoms of pancreatitis, serious hypersensitivity reactions, severe joint pain, or bullous pemphigoid; discontinue if suspected or occurs. History of angioedema to other DPP-4 inhibitors. Severe hepatic impairment. Elderly. Pregnancy. Nursing mothers. May need lower dose of concomitant sulfonylurea or insulin to reduce risk of hypoglycemia. Monitor digoxin. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. Upper respiratory tract infection, nasopharyngitis, headache; pancreatitis, heart failure, hypersensitivity reactions (eg, anaphylaxis, angioedema, Stevens-Johnson syndrome), severe and disabling arthralgia, bullous pemphigoid. Continue reading >>

Incretin Mimetic Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

Incretin Mimetic Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

Drugs in the incretin mimetic class include exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon), liraglutide (Victoza), sitagliptin (Januvia, Janumet, Janumet XR, Juvisync), saxagliptin (Onglyza, Kombiglyze XR), alogliptin (Nesina, Kazano, Oseni), and linagliptin (Tradjenta, Jentadueto). These drugs work by mimicking the incretin hormones that the body usually produces naturally to stimulate the release of insulin in response to a meal. They are used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia

What Is Januvia

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

What should I watch for? Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar, such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you have high blood sugar. You might need to change the dose of your medicine. If you are sick or exercising more than usual, you might need to change the dose of your medicine. Do not skip meals. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you should avoid alcohol. Many nonprescription cough and cold products contain sugar or alcohol. These can affect blood sugar. Wear a medical ID bracelet or chain, and carry a card that describes your disease and details of your medicine and dosage times. Common and Rare Side Effects Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: Less common blurred vision chills confusion cool, pale skin dizziness fast heartbeat headache increased hunger loss of consciousness nightmares seizures shakiness slurred speech unusual tiredness or weakness Incidence not known Continue reading >>

Alternatives For Januvia

Alternatives For Januvia

Januvia is a brand name for an oral anti-hyperglycemic drug that lowers blood sugar or glucose levels. This prescription medication contains the active ingredient sitagliptin and belongs to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Januvia is taken once a day and works to regulate blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetics in two ways. Januvia.com notes that it helps increase the levels of insulin produced by the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that is necessary to carry glucose from the blood into the cells of the body, where it can be used. Januvia also decreases blood glucose levels by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. Like all medications, Januvia can cause side effects and may not be suitable for all patients. There are several alternative medications for treating type 2 diabetes. Video of the Day Metformin is commonly sold under the brand name Glucophage and is in the biguanide class of drugs. It is the most popularly prescribed medication and often the first line of treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes. Drugs.com notes that metformin works by reducing blood glucose levels as well as by heightening the sensitivity of body cells to the hormone insulin. Metformin is sometimes prescribed in combination with other diabetes medications or insulin. In individuals with pre-diabetes or a risk of becoming diabetic, metformin is often prescribed as a preventative measure, along with nutritional and exercise therapies. Glyburide is a medication in a class of diabetes drugs called sulfonylureas. These drugs bind to receptors on the beta cells of the pancreas to stimulate more production of insulin. DiabetesNet.com notes that sulfonylurea medications have been used for the treatment of diabetes for many years and are often prescribed with m Continue reading >>

Januvia Smackdown

Januvia Smackdown

Get your ringside seats, Folks! A while back I posted about the Merck's new Type 2 oral drug Januvia (What It Doesn't Do), explaining how it apparently trumps competitors in terms of patient "tolerability." No other post has ever generated such ongoing reader energy, both positive and negative. Nearly every day, several new commentors weigh in, duking it out over the relative merits of Januvia. Most everyone seems to agree that Januvia reduces appetite, which is a good thing. But then again, Byetta is known for that effect as well. The key is question whether Januvia fulfills its core function of lowering blood glucose (BG) levels, and lives up to its no-side-effects promise. As of today, the score stands pretty much tied, as such: Total comments = 50 Positive = 10 Negative = 13 Mixed = 16 (liked some aspects of the drug but not others) Neutral = 11 (those asking or responding to questions only) Among the most vocal of the Pro Team: "I take Januvia and have for 6 months. I have no side effects. I have experienced a decrease in appetite. I have had no headaches or respiratory problems. My BG has gone down. It is a great drug." -- Mike "Januvia has been a positive thing for me. My sugar levels dropped from 240+ to 110 +/- 10 after fasting. I have taken 100 mg once per day for a month... I am not as hungry as before usage." -- Jim K. L. "I've been on Januvia for a little over three months and have lost over 15 pounds which I had put on with Actos. I've experienced no side effects, other than I am not hungry all of the time. For me it has been very effective..." -- Bill "I am substantially less hungry then I have felt in years ... and my BG hovers around 100 - 120 between meals/fasting, and 120 - 160 for a few hours after a heavy carb meal. The usual BG spikes of 180 - 200+ Continue reading >>

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral Type 2 diabetes medication manufactured by Merck & Co. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug in 2006, and it is one of the most popular Type 2 diabetes drugs on the market. In 2007, the FDA approved a variation of Januvia called Janumet, which is a combination of sitagliptin and metformin. Janumet also comes in an extended-release formula called Janumet XR. Januvia and Janumet are known as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Both Januvia and Janumet belong to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Januvia was the first DPP-4 approved by the FDA and is the top-selling brand in its class. Two million prescriptions were written for Januvia in 2011. Januvia brought in about $6 billion in 2014. Merck stands to benefit from the patent on the drug until 2022. In clinical trials, Januvia proved effective in controlling blood-sugar levels. However, some studies reported rare and serious side effects, including acute pancreatitis, severe joint pain, pancreatic cancer and thyroid cancer. How Do Januvia and Janumet Work? Januvia is designed to work with other Type 2 diabetes medications, like Byetta, to increase their effectiveness. It helps lower blood sugar in two ways. It helps the body increase insulin to stabilize blood sugar and decrease sugars that are made in the liver. It is a part of the class of diabetes medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. DPP-4 is a protein made by the body that plays a role in glucose metabolism. The process works like this: After a person eats and blood sugar rises, intestinal cells release hormones called incretin hormones. Incretin stimulates pancreatic cell Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia?

What Is Januvia?

Januvia is a prescription medication used to treat adults with type 2 diabetes. When used as part of a healthy lifestyle plan encompassing exercise and diet, Januvia helps patients control their blood sugar levels. Januvia, a type 2 diabetes medication manufactured by Merck & Co., generates an estimated $6 billion in sales each year. The FDA approved Januvia for treating type 2 diabetes in 2006. Since hitting the market, it has become one of the most commonly prescribed medications to reduce blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. By managing blood sugar, Januvia lessens the risk of other medical conditions caused by type 2 diabetes such as heart disease, kidney damage and eye problems. Unfortunately, there are several long-term risks associated with Januvia that can impact a person’s life forever. Numerous reports have linked Januvia to different cancers including pancreatic cancer and thyroid cancer. Even with new, stricter label requirements, Merck & Co. has been sued over their negligence to inform consumers about life-threatening side effects. SIDE EFFECTS of JANUVIA While there are many benefits of taking Januvia to help control your type 2 diabetes, some people may experience adverse side effects. Many side effects are minor and not harmful to your health. However, if you experience severe side effects that do not go away, you should seek medical attention immediately. Pancreatic cancer, thyroid cancer and acute pancreatitis are several of the most dangerous side effects of Januvia. Because of this, let your health provider know if you have a medical history of pancreatitis, gallstones or kidney problems. Januvia may also cause changes in your blood sugar levels. High or low blood pressure makes you susceptible to various complications such as a he Continue reading >>

Januvia (sitagliptin)

Januvia (sitagliptin)

Tweet Januvia (Sitagliptin) is an oral gliptin drug used to lower blood glucose levels amongst people with type 2 diabetes. Sitagliptin is the first of a class of drugs to be approved that mimics the actions of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) enzyme. How does Januvia work? Sitagliptin works by inhibiting the DPP-4 enzyme that destroys GLP and GIP hormones, allowing both to function more effectively. Both glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) are released by the intestine and affect blood glucose levels. When more of these hormones are released blood sugar levels are reduced. Who is Januvia prescribed to? Sitagliptin is prescribed to people with type 2 diabetes, and is usually taken alongside a healthy diet and regular, appropriate exercise to help control diabetes. Furthermore, Sitagliptin is often prescribed alongside other diabetes drugs such as (trade name first, generic name in brackets): Avandia (Rosiglitazone) Metformin (Metformin Hydrochloride) Actos (Pioglitazone) What side effects are associated with Januvia? Common side effects relating to sitagliptin include: Infections of the upper respiratory tract Headaches More infrequently, Sitagliptin is associated with abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhoea. I want to know more about Sitagliptin, what should I do? If your question is urgent, you should contact your doctor or diabetes healthcare professional immediately. Please use the Diabetes forum to get an independent perspective from the community. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 Continue reading >>

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

(sitagliptin And Metformin Hcl) Tablets Or

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Selected Risk Information About JANUMET and JANUMET XR Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinkin Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Take sitagliptin tablets once a day. Remember to follow any advice you have been given about your diet. The most common side-effects are feeling sick (nausea), headache, and nose or throat infections. About sitagliptin Type of medicine An antidiabetic medicine Used for Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Januvia®; Janumet® (a combination tablet containing sitagliptin with metformin) Available as Tablets Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar (glucose) in their blood. This is because good control of blood glucose levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like sitagliptin are given alongside the changes in diet. Sitagliptin works in part by increasing the amount of insulin produced by your body. It also reduces the amount of a substance called glucagon being produced by your pancreas. Glucagon causes your liver to produce more sugar, so by reducing the amount of glucagon in your body, this also helps to reduce the levels of glucose in your blood. Before taking sitagliptin Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking sitagliptin it is important that your doctor knows: If you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding. If you have any problems with the way your kidneys w Continue reading >>

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